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Thread: Ocular Rosacea Resources

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    Moderator phlika29's Avatar
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    Ocular rosacea and the symptomatic Helicobacter pylori infection: a case series

    http://www.mf.uni-lj.si/acta-apa/acta-apa-07-2/9.pdf

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    Moderator phlika29's Avatar
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    ARTICLE: The eyes have it: Systemic antibiotics produce response in patients with ocular rosacea

    http://dermatologytimes.modernmedici.../600523?ref=25

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    Moderator Melissa W's Avatar
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    From
    http://www.wsoctv.com/health/21239140/detail.html

    Zapping Dry Eye

    Posted: 12:23 pm EDT October 8, 2009
    Eye TearingTears are not just for crying. They lubricate the eye, wash away debris and dust, supply nutrients to the surface of the eye and help protect the eye from bacteria and infection.The film of tears is composed of three layers. The innermost layer, called the mucous component, contains proteins (mucins) that lubricate the eye’s surface and trap debris and germs.The middle layer, called the aqueous component, is a watery fluid produced by the lacrimal glands (the tiny gland in the inner corner of the eye). It contains electrolytes, proteins that fight bacteria and growth factors that promote wound healing.The outermost layer of the tear film is called the lipid component, an oily layer produced by the meibomian glands (a row of glands under the edges of the eyelids). The oily layer helps the watery middle layer spread over the eye and reduces evaporation to keep the surface moist.Dry EyesDry eye is a condition that affects tear production and/or drainage. Patients may complain of eye stinging, burning, irritation or discomfort. Vision may be blurred, causing difficulty viewing a computer monitor, watching television or seeing clearly while driving.Dry eye is associated with two main causes: poor quality of tears or inadequate production of tears. Poor quality of tears is the most common cause of dry eye. When the meibomian glands (those that produce the oily layer of the tear film) don’t properly function, oily secretions accumulate, leading to inflammation and growth of bacteria in the gland. The watery portion of the tears evaporates more quickly than it should. In addition to vision problems, blockages of the meibomian gland can lead to eye pain, redness and swelling.Decreased tear production occurs with age. Wind and/or dry air can hasten evaporation of tears and cause the surface of the eye to become dry. Exposure to irritants, hormonal changes (in women), use of certain medications, wearing contact lenses and having laser eye procedures can increase the risk for dry eye symptoms.The exact prevalence of dry eye isn’t known because many people don’t bother seeking help for the symptoms. Researchers estimate about one-third of American adults have some dry eye symptoms. Most cases are mild. About 30 percent of patients have moderate symptoms and 10 percent have severe symptoms.Treating Dry EyeThere are several ways to reduce the discomfort of dry eyes. Patients are usually advised to avoid environmental conditions that can exacerbate the symptoms, like wind, dry air, dust, smoke and eye irritants. Intentional blinking and taking breaks from reading or staring at a computer may help. Warm compresses may reduce fluid loss and improve flow of the oily layer of the tear film. Mild cases can also be treated by placing artificial tears in the eyes.In patients with moderate to severe cases of dry eye, doctors may recommend placement of plugs. Normally, tears drain into the nose through the tear duct. Punctal plugs are placed into the tear duct to slow the drainage of tears and keep more fluid on the surface of the eye. Absorbable plugs are made from collagen or other materials and last from two to six months. Other plugs, often made of silicone, are designed to remain in the tear ducts permanently. There is a risk a permanent plug could migrate and stick out or completely block the tear duct.Intense Pulsed Light for Dry EyeChristopher Coad, M.D., Ophthalmologist at Chelsea Eye & Cosmetic Surgery Associates in New York City, is using a technique for some dry eye patients called intense pulsed light therapy (IPL). IPL is sometimes used to reduce facial skin redness caused by growth of abnormal blood vessels in patients with rosacea. Doctors noticed that some rosacea patients reported easing of dry eye symptoms after getting IPL. That finding led physicians to try it for patients with dry eye.First, eye shields and a cooling ultrasound gel are placed around the eyes to protect the eyes and surrounding skin. Then, the IPL is aimed under the lower lid, moving across the eyes. Two passes of the light are made. Then the gel and eye shields are removed.Coad says IPL has three main effects on dry eye. First, the heat acts like a warm compress to liquefy the blocked oil that’s plugging the meibomian gland. Second, the small blood vessels that carry inflammatory cells to the site are sealed. Third, the light treatment improves the health and function of the meibomian gland, reducing the risk of further inflammation.IPL increases the risk for a sunburn in the treated area, so patients must avoid the sun and wear a sunblock for a week after treatment. Coad says most patients need four to six treatments spaced 4 to 6 weeks apart to bring the dry eye symptoms under control. After that, periodic maintenance treatments are needed, sometimes only once every six months to a year.Coad says the cost of IPL for dry eye is about $200 to $400 per treatment. Most insurance plans don’t cover the cost. IPL is not for patients with dark skin because the treatment can cause skin discoloration.For general information on dry eye: American Optometric Association
    The Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology
    National Eye Institute
    Prevent Blindness America®

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    Moderator Melissa W's Avatar
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    A few of the links in this thread are sadly no longer functioning.
    Here are some others that may be helpful.


    http://www.aoa.org/dry-eye.xml

    http://www.dryeyepain.com/

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