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Thread: Is there a test for seb derm?

  1. #1
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    Default Is there a test for seb derm?

    If I asked my derm or allergist to do a skin cell scrape and check it under the microscope, would they be able to tell if I have seb derm?

    My derm keeps telling me no, but my allergist did a cell scrap about a year ago and said there was "yeast". She said I had a fungal infection, but then my derm basically said she was crazy.

    I've been using Protopic or Elidel sparingly, and it does help, but I'm convinced the rashes I keep breaking out in are somehow related to a yeast or fungus, maybe linked to my gut issues.

    I'd really like to get a more specific med, either oral, topical, or both to try to treat it as a yeast or fungus issue, but I don't know how to get my derm to try it, or just ask my allergist to do another skin scrape. Or maybe just go to my internist and see if he'll prescribe something.

    Any thoughts?


    Thanks!

    ~J

  2. #2
    Senior Member J-Mill's Avatar
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    Default Seb Derm

    A skin scraping can allow a doctor to check the population of yeasts on your skin. An overpopulation of the M. furfur yeast could suggest seb derm. It is not conclusive however.

    You could talk to your derm about trying a short course of oral itraconazole and see if that helps.
    "Get busy living or get busy dying."

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by J-Mill View Post
    A skin scraping can allow a doctor to check the population of yeasts on your skin. An overpopulation of the M. furfur yeast could suggest seb derm. It is not conclusive however.

    You could talk to your derm about trying a short course of oral itraconazole and see if that helps.
    Thanks, I will.

    What about oral metro? Would that cover more bases if it could be linked to demodex or a different kind of fungul overgrowth? Or even Nystatin or something like that?

    I'm going to the docs next Tuesday and just want to go in with as much knowledge as I can since I seem to be the one with the best ideas when I go there!

    ~J

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    Senior Member J-Mill's Avatar
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    Default Metro

    Quote Originally Posted by boo2facialredness View Post
    Thanks, I will.

    What about oral metro? Would that cover more bases if it could be linked to demodex or a different kind of fungul overgrowth? Or even Nystatin or something like that?

    I'm going to the docs next Tuesday and just want to go in with as much knowledge as I can since I seem to be the one with the best ideas when I go there!

    ~J
    Metro has no antifungal properties, it does have antiparasitical properties and can kill mites. It would not however help seb derm.

    Nystatin is not as safe as itraconazole and goes after the wrong yeast (it is essentially an anti-candida drug). The only anti-fungals I know have been effective against seb derm are azoles, which attack M. furfur/globosa yeasts. I recommend itraconazole as it has a very good safety profile. All anti-fungals have the possibility of causing liver damage, itraconazole has a very good track record of not doing this, especially for short term use.
    "Get busy living or get busy dying."

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by J-Mill View Post
    Metro has no antifungal properties, it does have antiparasitical properties and can kill mites. It would not however help seb derm.

    Nystatin is not as safe as itraconazole and goes after the wrong yeast (it is essentially an anti-candida drug). The only anti-fungals I know have been effective against seb derm are azoles, which attack M. furfur/globosa yeasts. I recommend itraconazole as it has a very good safety profile. All anti-fungals have the possibility of causing liver damage, itraconazole has a very good track record of not doing this, especially for short term use.
    Thanks again!

    I know I read an article or study on itraconazole before, but can't find it now. What is the recommended dosing- isn't it 2 or 3 weeks and then you wait a week or 2 and on what would be week four you take it again for one or two days and then one or two days every month (assuming it works!)?

    I'm really going to try to push for this, at least as a starting point. If it doesn't work then I'm going to ask about trying a more general oral anti-fungal- like Nystatin or Diflucan. I am convinced it is somehow related to yeast/fungus, seb derm related or otherwise.

    ~J

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    Default Dosage

    Quote Originally Posted by boo2facialredness View Post
    Thanks again!

    I know I read an article or study on itraconazole before, but can't find it now. What is the recommended dosing- isn't it 2 or 3 weeks and then you wait a week or 2 and on what would be week four you take it again for one or two days and then one or two days every month (assuming it works!)?

    I'm really going to try to push for this, at least as a starting point. If it doesn't work then I'm going to ask about trying a more general oral anti-fungal- like Nystatin or Diflucan. I am convinced it is somehow related to yeast/fungus, seb derm related or otherwise.

    ~J
    Dosage is 200 mg/1X per day for 7 days. If this does help, normally a maintenance dose of 200 mg 1-4x a month is useful in maintaining results.
    "Get busy living or get busy dying."

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