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Thread: LCD monitors

  1. #1
    Member Panacea's Avatar
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    Default LCD monitors

    Hi,

    To anyone who has trouble with LCD monitors—and has had success with a filter:

    1. What is it about the LCD monitor that causes problems? Type of light? Radiation??
    2. Has anyone found a filter that works for them?

    I am newly diagnosed, and have been noticing that my face feels worse in front of my LCD monitors at home and at work. The computer is essential at my job, so I'm trying to find a solution asap.

    I also have read some posts where folks were having issues with CRT monitors. For those who switched to LCD—has it solved the problems? Do some of you use filters as well?

    Any suggestions would be appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Melissa

  2. #2
    Moderator phlika29's Avatar
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    Some people are light sensitive:

    Look at TP's post-second one down, very useful:

    http://www.rosaceagroup.org/The_Rosa...mputer+screens

    I did a post a while ago rounding up information on fluorescent lights that are often in offices (in case you are sensitive to UVA/UVB given off):

    http://www.rosaceagroup.org/The_Rosa...rescent+lights

    Hope this is of some help

    Sarah

  3. #3
    Senior Member Mistica's Avatar
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    I was of the belief ( and don't quote me on this), that the LCD monitors are much safer than the older, chunky models. Having said that, I have yet to find a convincing answer.

    Is it the monitor which is definitely the problem, or the act of sitting and staring for long periods of time?

    Sitting at the computer is one of my biggest triggers. I might have a day when I can sit and tend to email etc for a short period of time and not have problem, but mostly, I have to get up and hop about inbetween paragraphs.

    I have engaged in quite a few discussions with various people about this problem. As a test, my friend, whose passion is physics got to me sit at the computer, with the monitor/computer switched off. I had a piece of written work taped on to the screen and I sat there, concentrating, pretending to type what was on the paper.
    My face still went blotchy and then red. I was provided with a detailed explanation of radiation which I have since forgotten, but it is suffice to say,the same thing happens to varying degrees with certain activities. Whenever I engage in any activity, which has me sitting, working intently at something which has my body, especially my head in a fixed position. I know I am not doing a very good job of explaining here.
    Better to give examples. I can't sit at my easel and paint. I gave up painting with oils due to fume irritation and returned to water colour pencil. Same problem. I can't sit and read a book for long periods of time either. My face goes blotchy, then it starts to heat up and go really red.

    So, one has to wonder if some kind of alteration in blood circulation is the culprit? At least one of the culprits? Maybe the vessels in our faces are so damaged and dilated, they can't move the blood around in a timely fashion without the added help of moving the body about? After all, if you are walking about, the heart has to direct a great deal of blood to the legs, for example.

    Additionally, I recall reading that mental concentration is definitely a trigger for some rosaceans.
    Perhaps the combination of all of the above is the culprit, rather than the LCD monitors alone?

    I wonder if my description of triggers rings a bell with anyone else?

  4. #4
    Moderator Melissa W's Avatar
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    Yes Mistica that happens to me too!!
    I also go red/flushy if I sit and concentrate for long periods of time
    Luckily I am not in school anymoe because that would be a tough trigger to deal with for sure!

    And I do not feel that it is the computer that is the trigger. It is whenever I am doing something that requires lots of concentration and/or I get excited and emotions come into play as I am doing something whether it is talking on the phone even. If I am having an intense conversation bam....I could easily get a flush.

    Best wishes,
    Melissa

  5. #5
    Senior Member Mistica's Avatar
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    You are a phone flusher too?
    God, I have to pace about the room all time I am talking, in order to try and ward off a major flare.
    Laughing, any kind of emotion, just intensifies things.
    Thank God for the cordless phone!

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    Senior Member TheMediumDog's Avatar
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    How do you guys cope at work - if you have to sit down at a computer for a long time, say - where it might be less acceptable to go a-wandering?

  7. #7
    Senior Member Mistica's Avatar
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    I am currently not working.
    Been house bound for months.
    The past week has brought a little improvement, but far too soon to get excited yet.

    Regarding getting up and wandering around at work.
    I have not had a job where there was an enormous amount of computer work, so I could cope with what was required.
    I do appreciate though, if one is manning a call centre or such, it would be probably be very difficult to take frequent breaks.

    As for most office jobs, I was of the thought that frequent breaks were encouraged by management. Mostly due to eye strain and posture problems etc.??
    I have no personal experience in that field though and wonder if it is ever put into practise.

    For rosaceans who are computer programmers, or research scientists, their life must be a nightmare.

  8. #8
    Moderator Melissa W's Avatar
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    At work we don't have computers but that doesn't mean there are no flushing triggers...there are plenty. I deal with this with a fan everywhere I work (I work 2 different places) and other coping mechanisms. The hardest thing for me is the afternoon where it seems my face needs to flush so around 1pm I put the fan on if it hasn't been on and I just do the best I can. The worst thing now are the damn subways where it is just too hot while waiting for the trains. We are in the 4th day of a heat wave in NYC and it is not easy. But at least if I turn red I won't be the only one when it is 100 degrees F plus!

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    Senior Member allibear's Avatar
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    I work a lot on computers and have had major problems coping with the effect of the LCD monitors on my skin. A while back 2 minutes in front of a large screen turned me bright red and the usual stinging and burning on the cheeks started. I also had the same problem if I stood directly under flourescent lighting, which is one of the main problems in my 'day' job, because as well as computers I work under 80 strip flourescents and 200 intense 100 watt halogen lamps. Even when it was a comfortable temperature, by the afternoon I still flared up under the lighting. I have no flourescent lights at home but flared up in my Mum's when they are on in the kitchen.

    I did read an article about this a long time ago, it's something to do with the radation given out by the type of lighting found in both LCD monitors/televisions and flourescents that can effect people who are hypersensitive to light. The size of the screen and distance you are from it effects it. I could work on a laptop with a small 15" screen for a long period of time without flaring, but on the larger screens 17-19 inch+ it's a bigger problem. I only have a 20" LCD TV and sit around ten feet from it, it had no effect, but if I sat about two feet away I would flare. In a freinds house, with a 42" I would flare at about a six foot distance. (I experimented with all of this).

    My rosacea would also flare up if direct sunlight hit my face for any length of time, should it even be through a window, (say by accidently sitting on the wrong side of the bus where the sun was hitting that side during the journey), and this is even with sunsceen and makeup on.

    Wearing sunscreen in front of the PC would buy me more time, say from 2-3 minutes to up to an hour before I would flare.

    I have not bought an anti-glare shield for the monitor because I couldn't find one to fit a 19" widescreen, which I have at home, and have also read that it doesn't have much effect anyway for people who suffer from this sort of hypersensitvity to light. Though if I had have found one I would have tried it, although it wouldn't solve the problem for the many machines I work around in other places.

    I try to keep a reasonable distance from a monitor and turn the brigtness way down but as the eyesights not that great I do end up getting right up close to the screen if I am doing fiddly work in photoshop or something like that, it's just habit.

    I eventually resorted to making a mask which I wore when I knew I was in for a long haul run in front of the screen, much to my dismay but the amusement of some of the owner's of 'sick' PC's whose houses I had to go to equipped with my 'tacky' mask

    Thankfully now that my flushing in general has submitted into remission this light 'trigger' has resolved itself with that and I can now sit in front of any screen for as long as it takes to do the job without my skin flaring up and not looking like a complete idiot with the silly mask on.

    I still take precautions though with distance etc. as much as is physically possible and keep the brightness as low as I can possibly get away with.

  10. #10
    Moderator phlika29's Avatar
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    If you have to sit under fluorescent lights and feel that they are making you flair it would be worth investigating UV filters specifically designed for this. You can either buy them as tubes designed to go over the lights themselves or as flat sheets that you can cut to size. Alternatively if the fluorescent light is covered with a standard plastic screen then this can also help to cut out these wavelengths.

    I have more details at work of companies and products and will post them up when I get my hands on it.

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