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Thread: The importance of Oleic Acid in worsening Seborrheic dermatitis

  1. #11
    Senior Member J-Mill's Avatar
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    Default Along this train of thought

    Quote Originally Posted by Bradley View Post
    Maybe the problem isn't actually the Malassezia globosa fungus because apparently (a school of thought says) even non-seb derm sufferers have the same amount of fungus as us; the way we differ is how our skin reacts to this fungus. It seems our immune system over-reacts locally causing inflammation and redness in the area. So if only there was a potent anti-inflammatory that didn't have the side-effects of steroids...I've searched high and low and have literally tried every thing known to mankind but nadda...nothing works on a consistent basis. I think that my seb derm and rosacea are so intertwined that when something works for one condition it completely worsens the other.
    In addition to being anti-inflammatory steroids such as cortisone alter the body's natural immune system response. It is possible that people with seb derm have an immune system glitch in relation to M. Globosa (scalp) and M. furfur (facial skin) yeasts. Suppression of the immune system may explain their efficacy in treating the disorder.
    "Get busy living or get busy dying."

  2. #12
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    Default

    I wonder would that explain any positive effects of antibiotics on sebderm ie. the antiinflammatory components kicking in?
    Most dermatologists who've seen me - and I've been lucky in that I've seen some very good ones - seem to think that most of my skin problems are seb derm rather than rosacea.
    I've never been able to work out why, in that case, antiobiotics improve my skin, since in theory they should make seb derm worse. Do any other sebdermers here improve with antiobiotics?

    Neil

  3. #13
    Senior Member J-Mill's Avatar
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    Default Well

    Quote Originally Posted by indian_boy View Post
    I wonder would that explain any positive effects of antibiotics on sebderm ie. the antiinflammatory components kicking in?
    Most dermatologists who've seen me - and I've been lucky in that I've seen some very good ones - seem to think that most of my skin problems are seb derm rather than rosacea.
    I've never been able to work out why, in that case, antiobiotics improve my skin, since in theory they should make seb derm worse. Do any other sebdermers here improve with antiobiotics?

    Neil
    Certain antibiotics: Clarithromycin, Azithromycin and Floxacin all made by seb derm flare really bad. Tetracyclines appear to have no effect on it at all.
    "Get busy living or get busy dying."

  4. #14
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    Default

    This is interesting. I don't usually have a problem with seb derm. Just a tiny bit of it that is less than a quarter of the size of my baby finger nail and that goes away with Born to be Mild. But the last two days I've noticed that my skin is very dry. I'm using an oily skin moisturizer and I figured that it was probably drying my skin out so until I could do the research on a better moisturizer and go to the drug store and get it, I just used some of my spray moisturizer for the rest of my body - which is basically a few different types of antioxidant oils and what looks like a silicone. I bought the new moisturizer last night, but used the oil for two days. Today I have a scaly patch of red bumpy things on the side of my nose that is about the size of the fingernail on my ring finger. All of those oils that I used were high in oleic acid and I wonder now if this is the cause.

    Oh well, time to step up the Born to be Mild.

  5. #15
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    Default Jojoba oil bad for eyes

    Hi All,

    I haven't been writing here for a while, but was very interested in reading about the problems that can be caused by jojoba oil.

    I have tried jojoba oil a few months ago for my P&P (rosacea) and Seb Derm.
    The result after 2 weeks was that my skin became very smooth and soft on the P&P point, but on the Seb Derm point my skin became worse.
    I had to stop the jojoba oil because my eyes were very very irritated.
    So I think that oleic acid has a bad influence on blefaritus and ocular rosacea too.

    Saskia

  6. #16
    Senior Member findingaway's Avatar
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    Default

    Hi,

    Realise this is an old tread, but it's worth posting this here:


    Ok. Did some digging.

    Acording to this source, coconut oil contains very little Oleic Acid. So i think it won't aggravate SD. In fact it'll probably have a beneficial effect if anything.

    See chart below. Took a screen shot on my phone, so not sure how this will turn out, but here goes: http://www.scientificpsychic.com/fit...tyacids1.htmlp


    OK, the ones that are not included are Argan Oil and the popular Jojoba Oil.

    Argan Oil
    Palmitic acid (C16:0): 12 - 13%
    Stearic acid (C18:0): 5 - 7%
    Oleic acid (C18:1): 43 - 49.1%
    Linoleic acid (C18:2): 29.3 - 36.0%
    Linolenic acid (C18:3): 0.1%
    Arachidic acid (C20:0): 0.3 - 0.5%
    Gadoleic acid (C20:1): 0.4 - 0.5%

    Source

    Jojoba Oil
    [I]Fatty acid[/min]
    Eicosenoic 66%
    Docosenoic 14%
    Oleic 10%

    Really struggled to get composition info on this one.

    Source

    I don't know how accurate this info is btw.

    Food for thought at least

  7. #17
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    ^brb getting telescope.

    im using a moisturizer that contains 2.5% jojoba oil and its a hit or miss for me (usually a miss). bah gotta find another moisturizer.

  8. #18
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    Default Tea Tree Oil

    Add Tea Tree oil at 5 or 10% to your favorite oil and then it won't matter much what oil you use.

  9. #19
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    Default Consuming Oleic acid?

    Sorry for bumping this old thread but I just need to know if it just worsens SD when used on skin or does it also affect it if you consume it? I eat alot of extra virgin olive oil everyday and it would be great if someone could clear this up fpr me. Thanks a bunch.

  10. #20
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    Default

    I know this thread is old... but I'm curious about the same thing.

    If Oleic Acid is bad applied to the skin, how about the oleic acid consumed via olive oil in cooking and salad dressings?

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