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Thread: treating seb derm

  1. #1
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    Default treating seb derm

    hi everyone i do not have seb derm but have heard that many people on this site have experienced seb derm appearing or becomming worse after an IPL treatment using shallow filters.

    what exactly is seb derm how does it affect the average rosacea person?

    More importantly how can you get rid of the seb derm?

    would creams or anitobiotics work? im taking tetralysal once a day

    thanks for any advice

  2. #2
    Senior Member J-Mill's Avatar
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    Default Seb Derm

    Quote Originally Posted by ally24 View Post
    hi everyone i do not have seb derm but have heard that many people on this site have experienced seb derm appearing or becomming worse after an IPL treatment using shallow filters.

    what exactly is seb derm how does it affect the average rosacea person?

    More importantly how can you get rid of the seb derm?

    would creams or anitobiotics work? im taking tetralysal once a day

    thanks for any advice
    Seb Derm or Seborrheic Dermatitis is a disorder (likely autoimmune IMO) that causes chronic inflammation of the skin (redness, scaling). It is normally locating in lipase rich areas of the body (places that secrete a lot of sebum). It is thought to be linked to a yeast, the M. Furfur on the body/face and M. Globosa on the scalp. These yeasts are found in greater numbers on the skin of seb derm individuals. It is thought that they feed off the sebum and secrete a substance that is "toxic" causing the inflammation. It is very hard to treat. If you look in the co-existing conditions section you will find many posts about what people have tried that is successful/unsuccessful.

    For me, I found that an anti-fungal shampoo (I use Stieprox) with the very occassional use of a topical steroid (maybe 2-3x a year) keeps my scalp fairly clear...witht he faace however I have found that only weak topical steroids (1% hydrocortisone lotion) will keep me clear,, I use it fairly frequently.

    Here is a good article explaining this:

    http://www.aafp.org/afp/20000501/2703.html
    "Get busy living or get busy dying."

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    J-Mill;

    The link you provided states that "The etiology of seborrheic dermatitis remains unknown, although many factors, including hormonal, have been implicated". I wonder what he means by hormonal. It was 3 years ago that I was diagnosed with seb-derm. At the same time I noticed a dramatic decrease in my sex drive. When I went to an endo, I was tested and told that I was normal. Although I looking at the charts, I was in the extremely low end or normal. I've always wondered if their was a relationship between the two.

    Brian

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    Senior Member J-Mill's Avatar
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    Default Hormones and Seb Derm

    Quote Originally Posted by bfoley View Post
    J-Mill;

    The link you provided states that "The etiology of seborrheic dermatitis remains unknown, although many factors, including hormonal, have been implicated". I wonder what he means by hormonal. It was 3 years ago that I was diagnosed with seb-derm. At the same time I noticed a dramatic decrease in my sex drive. When I went to an endo, I was tested and told that I was normal. Although I looking at the charts, I was in the extremely low end or normal. I've always wondered if their was a relationship between the two.

    Brian
    I believe the author to be referring to the role of sebum production in seb derm. Sebum production is regulated by androgens (sex hormones). Therefore if sebum production plays a role in seb derm then hormones could play a factor.

    The theory is that increased sebum production provides a rich pool for lipase yeasts (yeasts that digest fat, like the fat in sebum) to feed off of in increased numbers. In short, the more sebum the more likely one is to contract seb derm and the worse the condition may be. Drugs that reduce sebum production such as accutane (in low dose mind you) and anti-androgens (used by women only) such as spironolactone have been found to improve >some< cases of seb derm. Like Rosacea, Seb Derm seems to have a number of potential triggers, some of which may be more important is some people then others. This would explain why some people with very oily skin never contracts eb derm while others with drier skin can. This would also explain why treatments that work for one person do not work for everyone. It is very much trial and error.
    "Get busy living or get busy dying."

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