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Thread: Reducing Redness and Inflammation in Rosacea - The Effects of Vitamin C

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    Senior Member cashisclay's Avatar
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    Default Reducing Redness and Inflammation in Rosacea - The Effects of Vitamin C

    March 8, 2001

    References obtained from Cosmetic Dermatology Feb 2001 - "Topical Vitamin C Preparation Reduces Erythema of Rosacea"

    Note: The VitaminC preparation used in the study contained in the article was the Cellex-C Eye Contour Cream with a 5% L-Ascobic Acid content and pH 3.0.

    The redness associated with rosacea may in part be due to free-radical production in the skin. This association led to testing the efficacy of the antioxidant vitamin C in reducing redness associated with rosacea.

    This study compared the effects of the Cellex-C Eye Contour Cream as compared to the placebo, Moisuturel - a moisturizing lotion used due to its similar appearance to the Cellex-C.

    Each patient applied the topical vitamin C to one side of the face and the moisturizing lotion to the other side once a day. The observer was blind as to which side of the face received the vitamin C preparation.

    When the 12 subjects completed the study, the side treated with the vitamin C preparation showed significantly decreased inflammation in the nose, cheek, and face overall. The difference in the chin or forehead alone was not significant.

    Out of the patients treated, 9 reported improvement on the treatment side of the face, 1 patient reported more improvement in the placebo side, and two patients reported no difference.

    Out of the 4 patients who responded most favorably to the treatment, 2 had continued to use their prescribed treatments at night, MetroGel and Cleocin T.

    Two patients described how their friends noticed a significant difference in one side of the face versus the other side.

    "The favorable results obtained with the 5% topical vitamin C preparation at pH3.0 used in the study may not transfer to other vitamin C preparations with higher concentration and greater acidity (and greater potential for irritation). Conceptually, vitamin C preparations with increased acidity may overwhelm the buffering system of the skin, and the resulting irritation may produce more redness than can be reduced by the anti-inflammatory, anti-redness effect of the vitamin C ingredient."

    No significant side effects or increases in inflammation were noted with either product.


    http://skincarerx.com/news6.html
    "Tomorrow the sun will rise. Who knows what the tide could bring?"

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    very interesting. i wonder which products that i already own may have C in them.
    trying a new diet

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    Senior Member allibear's Avatar
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    I have been using a moisturiser from Liz Earle's Naturally Active Skincare range called 'Superskin', which contains, amongst other ingredients, cranberry, borage and rosehip oil, which is a natural source of vitamin C. I was down to everything I tried irritating the hell out of my skin and I got a small sample and it was the first one in a long time that my skin didn't 'flare up' and grumble about, so I have stuck with it for the past five months, even though it's a bit expensive

    I came off antibiotics in January. At this time I was clear of P&Ps but still very red. My redness has continued to reduce slowly over the past few months. I am not a great believer in the powers of 'lotions and potions' but after reading this thread I am now beginning to wonder maybe just how much my skincare might be contributing to this.
    Last edited by allibear; 23rd April 2008 at 05:38 PM.

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    Senior Member queta's Avatar
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    Default I'm going to try it

    Quote Originally Posted by cashisclay View Post
    March 8, 2001

    References obtained from Cosmetic Dermatology Feb 2001 - "Topical Vitamin C Preparation Reduces Erythema of Rosacea"

    Note: The VitaminC preparation used in the study contained in the article was the Cellex-C Eye Contour Cream with a 5% L-Ascobic Acid content and pH 3.0.

    The redness associated with rosacea may in part be due to free-radical production in the skin. This association led to testing the efficacy of the antioxidant vitamin C in reducing redness associated with rosacea.

    This study compared the effects of the Cellex-C Eye Contour Cream as compared to the placebo, Moisuturel - a moisturizing lotion used due to its similar appearance to the Cellex-C.

    Each patient applied the topical vitamin C to one side of the face and the moisturizing lotion to the other side once a day. The observer was blind as to which side of the face received the vitamin C preparation.

    When the 12 subjects completed the study, the side treated with the vitamin C preparation showed significantly decreased inflammation in the nose, cheek, and face overall. The difference in the chin or forehead alone was not significant.

    Out of the patients treated, 9 reported improvement on the treatment side of the face, 1 patient reported more improvement in the placebo side, and two patients reported no difference.

    Out of the 4 patients who responded most favorably to the treatment, 2 had continued to use their prescribed treatments at night, MetroGel and Cleocin T.

    Two patients described how their friends noticed a significant difference in one side of the face versus the other side.

    "The favorable results obtained with the 5% topical vitamin C preparation at pH3.0 used in the study may not transfer to other vitamin C preparations with higher concentration and greater acidity (and greater potential for irritation). Conceptually, vitamin C preparations with increased acidity may overwhelm the buffering system of the skin, and the resulting irritation may produce more redness than can be reduced by the anti-inflammatory, anti-redness effect of the vitamin C ingredient."

    No significant side effects or increases in inflammation were noted with either product.


    http://skincarerx.com/news6.html
    Hello:

    I'm going to try making a paste with buffered Vitamin C powder on my nose as an experiment. I'll let you know in a few days what I think.

    Queta

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    Senior Member cashisclay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by queta View Post
    Hello:

    I'm going to try making a paste with buffered Vitamin C powder on my nose as an experiment. I'll let you know in a few days what I think.

    Queta
    Awesome. Please let us know how it works.
    "Tomorrow the sun will rise. Who knows what the tide could bring?"

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    Senior Member TheMediumDog's Avatar
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    Guys, you need to be aware that topical vitamin c is a difficult thing to deal with. It is very unstable. Most of the products advertising vitamin c as an ingredient will do nothing at all, since the vitamin c will have long since broken down (they put special colourings in so that you don't notice; I kid you not).

    Still, it is possible. You just need to know what you're doing.

    Here's a good resource.

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    Senior Member queta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheMediumDog View Post
    Guys, you need to be aware that topical vitamin c is a difficult thing to deal with. It is very unstable. Most of the products advertising vitamin c as an ingredient will do nothing at all, since the vitamin c will have long since broken down (they put special colourings in so that you don't notice; I kid you not).

    Still, it is possible. You just need to know what you're doing.

    Here's a good resource.
    Hi Medium Dog:
    Thanks for the tip! My Vitamin C powder is from my doc (he's an MD but is naturopathically oriented and the first doc who's ever helped me.) Anyway, it is a powder that you mix in water and then wait two minutes while it fizzes. Hopefully it is still active. I have had luck with it doing what they call a "Vitamin C flush" in which you take several doses 15 minutes apart until you get an enema-like flush. After I do the flush my skin looks great the next few days so it appears to be doing something. Anyway, I am letting it fizz and putting it on my nose. It's a little sticky which is annoying but I'm willing to try anything. I am pretty much keeping my phymatous rosacea at bay but it does seem to be progressing a bit. The pores on my nose looked plugged, especially when I flush. I am on a very low dose of accutane (10 mg every fourth day) but I might increase it to 10 mg every third day because my pores look a little worse lately. I'll let everyone know how the vitamin C on the nose seems to work. I'll keep my fingers crossed. I read that Vitamin C can help heal leaky blood vessels...hope it helps me with my nose swelling and enlarged pores.

    Regards
    Queta

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    Moderator phlika29's Avatar
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    skin actives sells it as an ingredient

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    Senior Member queta's Avatar
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    Default Vitamin C trial

    Hi all:
    I have been dissolving the buffered Vitamin C powder and putting it on my nose before bed at night. I have done this for three nights in a row. I've been careful not to do anything else differently. I really think it might be doing something. My nose usually is slightly swollen and the pores are enlarged. The swelling and pore enlargement is caused by flushing and it gets worse and better depending on what I'm exposed to (environmental allergens, foods, alcohol). Sometimes I take an antihistamine before bedtime which seems to help somewhat, but since starting the Vitamin C on my nose I haven't so I wouldn't skew the results. I will keep you posted but it does seem to be helping. I looked at my nose in the mirror today and it looks slimmer...more like my "old nose" from years ago. I'm not saying that this will be a total answer or allow me to drink alcohol or something but any helpful addition to my regimen is always welcome. Hope this keeps up!
    Queta

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    Senior Member cashisclay's Avatar
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    Great news! I things keep going well for you I will have to give this a shot myself.
    "Tomorrow the sun will rise. Who knows what the tide could bring?"

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