Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: RLT similar effects as sunlight?

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    16

    Default RLT similar effects as sunlight?

    Hey, i've always found that getting a bit of sun helps my skin. My skin always appears less blotchy and pale after ive been in the sun for a while. Im pretty sure it helps prevent me flushing also.

    I was just interested if RLT works under the same kind of principles as the sun. Do people who benefit from RLT also benefit from getting some sun??

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Moderator phlika29's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Dorset, UK
    Posts
    8,371

    Default

    Twickle Purple did a great post that included abit on what you are as

    Sunshine

    Bright sun at midday in summer, south of the mason-dixon line (let's just say Florida, Texas and California which covers most of us non-New Yorkers anyway) has a lot more energy in the red and near infrared (about 39 mW/cm^2 - see chart below) than most LEDs. But the Sun's light is not pulsed and the energy is spread over the full red and near-infrared healing range (630 to 920 nm or so) instead of being very strong in pulses at a precise wavelength. The wavelengths longer than 920 nm are why the Sun is hot - the water in your skin is absorbing the energy. Strong sunlight is probably as good for you as any LED array....if you avoid getting too much UV. I have used a corrugated plastic sheet like those used in green houses, but the special kind that is clear and blocks UVA and UVB (I tested it to be sure with a UVA/UVB meter). It costs about $40 per sheet at Lowes and I bought just one sheet. One sheet is barely big enough to cover your body. I place two chairs at each end of my lounge chair and use their backs to support the plastic sheet. Otherwise, you can use sunscreen, which may not block the aging and cancer-causing rays very well. But 15 minutes of direct UV sun each day produces a lot of vitamin D which prevents a lot more of the big cancers (prostate, breast, and colon) and it's not long enough to worry about skin cancer. My arthritic fingers feel better for about a week after spending some time on the beach.
    Source

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    16

    Default

    Some good info there, thanks. So do you think that if the sun doesnt make you flush, or give you sunburn it could be benefitial?

  4. #4
    Moderator Melissa W's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    new york
    Posts
    10,135

    Default

    Another thread discussed this topic briefly
    http://www.rosaceagroup.org/The_Rosa...ad.php?t=11381

    Windsor 90 wrote:
    Sunlight contains ultraviolet radiation, visible light and infrared radiation. The colors that compose sunlight are known as visible light. If you remember from science class: roy g biv are the colors of the rainbow. Red light has the longest wavelength as opposed to violet light which has the shortest.

    **At the violet end, we have Ultra Violet light (shorter than violet) and is not visible to the eye although I believe birds and bumble bees can detect UV light.

    **On the red end, we have Infra Red (longer than red) is also not visible to the human eye.

    Everything in between is considered visible light and can be perceived by human vision. The bookends, UV and IR, are on opposite ends of the electromagnetic spectrum with visible light being in between.

    Consider Red light therapy to be compressed light from the red and infrared spectrum. Red light is visible. Infrared is not visible. Because of the wavelength, the red light is easily absorbed by the skin because the tissue contains water and blood and can penetrate deeply into the tissue. Infrared can penetrate farther because of the wavelength. The longer the wavelength, the farther it will go. Ultraviolet light wavelengths are short and somehow break what bonds the skinís tissue together. Burning or tanning is the natural response to the skin being exposed to UV light.

    There are basically 2 types of Ultraviolet light: UVA and UVB: UVA is the same strength all year long no matter where you are on the planet and it easily goes through glass. I would imagine this is what fades the carpet and drapes in your hosue. UVB is stronger in the summer months, especially between 10-2 and does not penetrate glass. I believe that Infrared light does not penetrate glass either.
    and from

    http://www.rosaceagroup.org/The_Rosa...ght#post174618

    Claudia wrote
    Direct sunlight during peak hours (10-4) causes blood vessels to dilate, mainly because the skin is getting hot. Hence a red flush.

    Rosacea skin is often thinner with more blood vessels exposed which makes the flushing even worser than it would be for a person with more normal skin. Also people with thinner skin are more prone to skin cancers.

    When the flushing starts then those with p&p's start getting them too because the skin becomes inflamed, etc.

    It's a snowball effect that's not good.
    and Corinna wrote:

    Sunlight has some very beneficial aspects. Skin therapy with UVB light has been used for many years for eczema and psoriasis (and recently for Acne). Full spectrum light is good for the brain to beat the winter blahs. "New research into the preventive benefits of vitamin D has raised hopes that the sunshine vitamin, which is produced naturally in the body through exposure to the sun's ultraviolet rays, could extend and improve people's lives." And, of course, single frequency light is getting some attention here lately (see the LLLT section) and many have found that their skin benefits from light from the far-red/near-infrared spectrum.

    Regardless of the treatments that utilize it, I've always thought it was the UV that affected us the worst. Even with narrow band UVB (Blue light) treatment, the risk of skin problems and long term risk of cancer is considerable, and eye damage can be quick and permanent.

  5. #5
    Moderator phlika29's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Dorset, UK
    Posts
    8,371

    Default

    It is extremely important that you don't allow yourself to burn or get red. Long term exposure to UVA and UVB can cause skin cancer (melanoma and non melanoma) as well as ageing, eye damage, etc.

    As always it is a personal choice, I personally wouldn't sit out without a hat but then again I used to do sun safety health promotion campaigns at primary schools.

    http://www.nsc.org/library/facts/sunsafet.htm

    This pdf briefly talks about how sun can generate skin cell activity.

    Further benefits can be achieved through reducing the exposure of skin cells to environmental factors. A major contributor to excessive skin cell activity is sunlight. Not only is the ultraviolet radiation a major contributor, but the excessive heat energy delivered to skin cells is enough on its own to cause problems for those with rosacea.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    16

    Default

    So generally it seems like the sun can do more damage than good. It's just strange how I can literally go outside for 5-10 minutes with the sun shining on my face, come back and my face will be pale.

  7. #7
    Moderator Melissa W's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    new york
    Posts
    10,135

    Default

    Controlled doses of sunlight can be good for you but you need very little unprotected sun. The UV rays do more harm than good. Red light therapy might be helpful to you but it is a time commitment and patience is key.

    Best wishes,
    Melissa

  8. #8
    Senior Member Twickle Purple's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    BC
    Posts
    2,270

    Default

    Sun is the worst thing for my facial skin. Not only does the warmth create a flush it feels like a scald. My skin is quite photosensitive, which is something that many rosaceans experience.

    Through prolonged use of RLT (coming up to 2 years) I have noticed that I have a greater sun exposure tolerance now though. This winter and spring (so far) I can go out on days that are not bright without a hat... and I am thinking of getting my tinting removed from my glasses. This last bit is huge because last summer I had to wear heavily tinted glasses covered with heavily tinted cocoons and it was still the light was too bright. Progress is being felt.

    Happiness is a choice.

  9. #9
    Senior Member TheMediumDog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,526

    Default

    Sunlight is one of those issues where I'd be tempted to pay most attention to the response of your individual skin, rather than to theories, since it seems that it affects rosaceans very differently.

    Of course, do not over-expose yourself to sun. And if it does cause flushing through the heat it generates, that's surely only a bad thing.

    But I've recently found limited exposure to be helpful. As well as vit d, I think sunlight provides energy for the skin to carry out basic processes (though you could no doubt get this from other sources).

    (When I say limited, I mean very limited. It only takes a few minutes before my skin gets hot, and I get in the shade).

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    491

    Default

    I recently remembered that a while ago when I would sunbath that I would be pale for a few hours and then get really really red later on. I never thought much about it until recently. My current thought is that the ultraviolet light may be the part that causes the trigger...at least for me. I have tolerated 415nm (violet-blue) light without a problem and 660nm (red light) as well. So far I have not seen any benefit from light, but at least I can tolerate exposure about the 400nm range.

    As mentioned earlier, if you were to use glass to filter the UVA and UVB out, then you would have some pretty good light from the sun. This may be the part that helps some people. If I find that red light is not helping, then my next plan is to simulate sunlight, but remove the UVA, UVB, and infrared. I am hoping to capture the rays that may help by using all wavelengths between 400-900nm rather than just isolated wavelengths (provided my current approaches do not work).

    As far as heat goes, that is certainly a problem. But the simple reality is that any light will create heat, just like red light does. This is where you must understand your dosage and control the amount of energy that you are exposing yourself to. One problem with the broadband approach that I have mentioned is the heat. If you want to the same amount of energy at 660nm as you would with RLT, you would need significantly more energy from the broadband source. This is bad from a heat standpoint, but potentially good in that you get exposure from other wavelengths. For example, I have heard reports of some benefiting from 880nm more than 660nm. Possibly there are better wavelengths between these two. You can only find that out from the broadband source.

    Anyway, I kind of feel like mediumdog on this one. The sun is a mixed bag. But if you use it intelligently, you may get good results.

Similar Threads

  1. Sunlight improving rosacea?
    By Otter in forum General rosacea questions
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 16th September 2011, 11:24 PM
  2. Is it possible sunlight is good for me?
    By Lemon in forum Diet, lifestyle and relationships
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 3rd March 2010, 10:25 AM
  3. Sunlight
    By karadan in forum Diet, lifestyle and relationships
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 26th March 2009, 12:12 AM
  4. IPL - Sunlight - and Running
    By brasileirao in forum Intense pulsed light and laser
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 28th June 2007, 08:24 AM
  5. Exposure to sunlight
    By jnelson in forum News, research articles and current affairs
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10th October 2005, 11:21 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •