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Thread: Finacea = byproduct of Malassezia Furfur??!

  1. #1
    Senior Member TheMediumDog's Avatar
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    Default Finacea = byproduct of Malassezia Furfur??!

    To say the least, I was a bit shocked when I first came across this.

    Azelaic acid, the active ingredient in Finacea, is a substance produced by Malassezia Furfur (aka Pityrosporum ovale).

    ...the very same Malassezia Furfur that is heavily implicated in seb derm.

    I've double-checked a load of websites, and they all confirm it. So...what gives?

  2. #2
    Senior Member J-Mill's Avatar
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    Default True

    This is true. In fact this is why is is thought that certain fungal infections cause loss of skin pigment at the infection site (azelaic acid reduces melanin pigmentation).

    This is not the byproduct BTW of M. furfur that is inflammatory to the skin.
    "Get busy living or get busy dying."

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    Senior Member TheMediumDog's Avatar
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    This is not the byproduct BTW of M. furfur that is inflammatory to the skin.
    Ah.

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    Default

    I concur with J and would add that Dermnet list azelaic acid as being "anti-inflammatory".
    http://www.dermnetnz.org/treatments/azelaic-acid.html
    Rob

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    Moderator man_from_mars's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TheMediumDog View Post
    Ah.
    Well glad you understand - now can you explain it to me?
    (not sure exactly which statement is true)

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    Senior Member J-Mill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheMediumDog View Post
    Ah.
    Ha.


    sorry, couldn't resist the chance.
    "Get busy living or get busy dying."

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    I am lost

    so if we use Finacea.....and we have seb derm....we are basically feeding the existing fungus on our face with another or the same fungus? Fungus on top of more fungus
    Dx 1998

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    Ah, no.

  9. #9
    Senior Member TheMediumDog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J-Mill View Post
    Ah
    Ha.


    sorry, couldn't resist the chance.
    Life contains too few genuine pleasures; be my guest.


    Lookout: Something close to that was exactly what I was worried about. But what J-Mill is saying is that the byproduct of M. Furfur that inflames the skin to produce the symptoms of seb derm is different to the byproduct that is used in Finacea, i.e. azelaic acid.

    Presumably, the yeast produces many different chemicals as it goes about its business. One of these would be azelaic acid; another would be chemical x which seb-derm people react to; and so on.

    Still, I must say that it is remarkable that a byproduct of the yeast involved in seb derm - a condition so closely tied to so many cases of rosacea - can be so effective in the management of the latter. It seems uncanny; too coincidental to be left at that.
    Last edited by TheMediumDog; 24th September 2008 at 05:04 AM.

  10. #10
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    Default no, this is not correct.....

    the malassezias are a big family of fungus. Fufur is good and lives on normal skin, its cousin Malassezia Globosa is the bad one that causes seb. derm and other rashes......you do not want globosa on your face, furfur will not harm you however.


    Recently, identification of Malassezia on skin has been aided by the application of molecular or DNA based techniques very similar to those used by forensic scientists to identify criminal suspects. These investigations show that in humans the species causing most skin disease, including the most common cause of dandruff and seborrhoeic dermatitis is M. globosa. The skin rash of tinea versicolor (pityriasis versicolor) is also due to infection by this fungus.

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