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Thread: The Benefits

  1. #1
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    Default The Benefits

    Is there any kind of consensus as to what kind of benefits one might derive from using low level laser therapy?

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    Moderator Melissa W's Avatar
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    Hi JtothaK,

    I think you mean the benefits of low level light therapy (if I'm wrong I apologise).

    There was a poll thread where people were asked those questions but for some reason it has been changed :?

    From my reading in this section I find that some people experience great benefits ie reduced flushing, burning, redness and very few experience any ill effects. Some people have no change but we don't know if that's because they gave up too soon or not. Like with anything having to do with rosacea each individual experiences unique reactions to treatments.

    IowaDavid, Peter, Heather and Corinna are a few of the people who have experienced great benefits from the low level light therapy.

    I am currently doing DPL low level light therapy (combo mainly infrared and some red). I have not experienced any dramatic changes yet but I have only been doing it for about 6 weeks and my understanding is that the effects are cumulative.

    I'm not sure I answered your question but I hope the info was somewhat helpful.

    Best wishes,
    Melissa

    Edit:
    Low level light poll thread now fixed and here is the link if you're interested.
    http://forum.rosaceagroup.org/viewtopic.php?t=4208

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    Quote Originally Posted by melissawohl
    Hi JtothaK,

    I think you mean the benefits of low level light therapy (if I'm wrong I apologise).

    There was a poll thread where people were asked those questions but for some reason it has been changed :?

    From my reading in this section I find that some people experience great benefits ie reduced flushing, burning, redness and very few experience any ill effects. Some people have no change but we don't know if that's because they gave up too soon or not. Like with anything having to do with rosacea each individual experiences unique reactions to treatments.

    IowaDavid, Peter, Heather and Corinna are a few of the people who have experienced great benefits from the low level light therapy.

    I am currently doing DPL low level light therapy (combo mainly infrared and some red). I have not experienced any dramatic changes yet but I have only been doing it for about 6 weeks and my understanding is that the effects are cumulative.

    I'm not sure I answered your question but I hope the info was somewhat helpful.

    Best wishes,
    Melissa

    Edit:
    Low level light poll thread now fixed and here is the link if you're interested.
    http://forum.rosaceagroup.org/viewtopic.php?t=4208
    LOL you're right that's what I meant. My bad.

    Thanks Melissa. It's very hard for me to find any journal articles on this subject but it does pique my interest. I'm curious have you noticed any results yet? How long do you plan on giving it?

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    Hi JtothaK,

    I just saw my 2 derms yesterday. My primary derm and afterwards my laser derm for my 5th VBeam. I asked them both about the light therapy and my primary derm didn't think it was a good idea (and of course had no time to explain..but to be fair he squeezed me in after his last patient of the morning) and my laser derm admitted she knew nothing about that area.

    I told Dr. Levine (my laser derm) that I would email some info to her via Dr. Cohen (my primary derm) but when I did a search all I could really find was Forum info and info from the makers of the light devices. Nothing too scientific. They both like scientific data and won't pay much attention to anecdotal reports from members here so I will try to find some scientific info later when I have some time. If you do manage to find info please let me know. That would be a great help. Corinna posted info that is in a sticky now in this section but it really didn't say that much about rosacea that I could find.

    As for my results so far with the light therapy it's difficult to come to any conclusion at this point. I am in my 7th week as of yesterday and have noticed no dramatic results. I thought a few times that perhaps my threshold for flushing has been raised but I am not sure. This is a tough time of year concerning flushing for me as the winter indoor heat is fierce right now. I had a strong flush going yesterday at the doctors offices because of the heat. My primary derm was taken aback and said he thought I should be doing better. Unbelievable. Doesn't he realize you can go from pale to really red in a matter of minutes if the conditions are right (or wrong)

    As I understand this topic though the results are cumulative and some people did not experience the effects until a few months of doing the light therapy. So I plan on continuing for at least a few more months. Unfortunately I think I may take a 2 week break considering I just had VBeam and don't want to take any chances. Some people feel that the light will speed the recovery but because my DPL unit has mainly infrared and does emit warmth whcih is a trigger for me I think it's a good idea to stop for 2 weeks. Then I will start again.

    I don't know if you read through all the light therapy threads but when you get a chance it has a good amount of info. Let me know how you get on and what you decide.

    All the best,
    Melissa

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    Moderator Melissa W's Avatar
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    BTW,
    What convinced me to try this was speaking (via email) with a few people who swore it turned their rosacea around. People, who like me, were experiencing burning and flushing on a regular basis. That really motivated me to give it a shot. I know we all react differently though to treatments but it certainly is a low cost and easy and noninvasive treatment to try!

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    I'm sure this question has been answered before but I've been unable to find a specific answer so far: Is RLT found to help permanent redness (erythema)?

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    Moderator Melissa W's Avatar
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    Hi jwies,

    I believe some people have had success in decreasing their permanent redness somewhat. I think laser would have a more dramatic effect on that though as well as being quicker. As I wrote before, you need to be patient when doing low level light therapy. Results do not happen quickly so you have to be invested in it for the long haul before you can assess how it is helping you.

    Best wishes,
    Melissa

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    It has worked wonders for my persistent redness.

    Some bits-and- bobs. The anti-inflammatory actions are, it seems, pretty much accepted as a given.

    'CONCLUSION: LED photomodulation reverses signs of photoaging using a new nonthermal mechanism. The anti-inflammatory component of LED in combination with the cell regulatory component helps improve the outcome of other thermal-based rejuvenation treatments.
    PMID: 16176771 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]'



    Department of Dermatology, Nippon Medical School, Sendagi, Tokyo, Japan.
    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Red light phototherapy with laser sources has been used successfully for a number of indications. A new generation of quasimonochromatic 630 +/- 3 nm light-emitting diode (LED) systems has recently been yielding good results for the same indications, but no study has examined changes in visible red light irradiated skin at an immunological level. This study was thus designed to examine changes in skin-homing T-cell levels induced in normal human skin by visible red LED energy. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Six adult male volunteers (35 approximately 48 years old) who satisfied all study criteria had the skin over the lateral aspect of the leg irradiated once per week for 8 weeks with a visible red (630 +/- 3 nm) LED-based system, with irradiance of 105 m/cm2, 15 minutes/session, and a radiant flux of 94 J/cm2. Skin biopsies were performed after the eighth treatment session, and cultures were prepared to assay the type and quantity of skin-homing T-cells using qualitative and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques. Ultrastructural changes were also assessed with transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS: Transmission electron microscopy revealed mild fibroplastic changes in fibroblasts, with no acute inflammatory changes throughout the treatment session. Qualitative PCR showed the presence of both Th-1 and Th-2 T-cells, and quantitative PCR showed an increase in the numbers of both types of skin-homing T-cells, much more so for Th-2 than for Th-1. CONCLUSIONS: Visible red LED irradiation appears to activate the skin-homing immune system.
    PMID: 16641531 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


    Maryland Laser Skin & Vein Institute, Hunt Valley, Maryland 21030, USA. rweiss@mdlaserskinvein.com
    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Photomodulation has been described as a process which modifies cell activity using light sources without thermal effect. The objective of this study was to investigate the use of a non-thermal low dose light emitting diode (LED) array for improving the appearance of photoaged subjects. STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS: This prospective study investigated a random cohort of patients (N = 90) with a wide range of photoaged skin treated by LED photomodulation using a full panel 590 nm non-thermal full face LED array delivering 0.1 J/cm(2) with a specific sequence of pulsing. Subjects were evaluated at 4, 8, 12, 18 weeks and 6 and 12 months after a series of 8 treatments delivered over 4 weeks. Data collected included stereotactic digital imaging, computerized optical digital profilometry, and peri-ocular biopsy histologic evaluations for standard stains and well as collagen synthetic and degradative pathway immunofluorescent staining. RESULTS: Digital imaging data showed a reduction of signs of photoaging in 90% of subjects with smoother texture, reduction of peri-orbital rhytids, and reduction of erythema and pigmentation. Optical profilometry showed a 10% improvement by surface topographical measurements. Histologic data showed markedly increased collagen in the papillary dermis of 100% of post-treatment specimens (N = 10). Staining with anti-collagen I antibodies demonstrated a 28% (range: 10%-70%) average increase in density while staining with anti-matrixmetalloproteinase (MMP)-1 showed an average reduction of 4% (range: 2%-40%). No side effects or pain were noted. CONCLUSIONS: Photomodulation to reverse photoaging is possible with a specific array of LEDs with a specific fluence using a precise pulsing or "code" sequence. Skin textural improvement by digital imaging and surface profilometry is accompanied by increased collagen I deposition with reduced MMP-1 (collagenase) activity in the papillary dermis. This technique is a safe and effective non-painful non-ablative modality for improvement of photoaging. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    PMID: 15654716 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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    Moderator Melissa W's Avatar
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    Hi GJ,
    Thanks for that info.

    Do you by any chance have any scientific info pertaining specifically to roacea and LED therapy? I would like to send any scientific data regarding rosacea and LED therapy to my 2 dermatologists.

    I have been searching but so far mainly nonrosacea related.

    Thanks,
    Melissa

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    No. But I haven't looked of late. Not really my cup of tea this sort of palaver.

    There is enough literature around to convince even the most dim-witted derm that LLLT has anti-inflammatory actions.

    Given that inflammation plays some part in rosacea - and I do not think this can be denied - they must surely be moved to concede that LLLT may prove helpful for rosaceans.

    Two derms, Melissa? Shopping in Cartiers? It is a wonder you deign to mix with the sort of rough types we get around here!

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