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Thread: Treatment Reports from Rosacea Treatment Institute of Texas

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by cashisclay View Post
    Well I was all set to go to the RIIT in January to "cure" my rosacea, but backed out because of Dr. Nase. I talked to him probably half a dozen times and Dr. Neilson 3 times. Dr. Nase said they would "knock my rosacea out of the park" and out it in remission and Dr. Neilson told me there are NO guarantees and the treatment MIGHT help. I told Dr. Neilson that I think Dr. Nase is misleading many people and that you better talk to him to clear things up. I called Anne the next day and told her I was cancelling everything. She saked why I said because of Dr. Nase, I think he has mislead me, big time.

    The funny thing is that i had been trying to get in touch with Dr. Nase for at least 3 weeks before this all went down. I left him probably 6 messages on his voicemail and I never heard from him. However, about 5 minutes after I hung up with Anne saying I was not going to do the treatments, guess who called? Dr. Nase! What an a**hole! I just had the laugh at that.

    **TO ANYONE THINKING OF GOING TO RIIT OR LISTENING TO DR. NASE**

    Be very, very, very careful! Even though I did not go through with treatment I feel l was greatly mislead by Dr. Nase. Dr. Neilson will tell you exactly how it is and Dr. Nase will lie to you. Nase is a great salesman and will have you believeing that you will cured, but Dr. Neilson will not say that.

    If you are going to do this talk to Dr. Neilson not Nase. Dr. Nase has nothing to do with treatment except get you to go and believe in it.
    That pretty much sums him up. Thanks for the info. I don't think he's ever gone a day without misleading someone or blatantly lying.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Peter's Avatar
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    But it's much more than this isn't it? The deception and lies has gone on for years but many people outside of the Rosacea Forums are not aware of his history and following his "so called expert advice" sign up for potentially skin damaging laser treatment at the RTIT. We have heard of people leaving this Clinic after a condensed protocol course of laser treatments and then finding that they are now flushing far worse, even months after the event.

    This business with Nase has been dragging on and it is only a few months since the last time he appeared to be posting on here with a fake persona (Jordan and his Mom). If people will not make the effort now, then these attempts to deceive the groups / community / general public will probably continue indefinitely.

    Just by chance today I came across a book review in my newspaper called "The quack with a fertile imagination - Charlatan: The fraudulent life of John Brinkley"




    I have never heard of this guy before but the review and some digging around I did later made some fascinating but frightening reading especially when we start drawing comparisons with Nase. Here is one description I got off the Internet:

    "This is the enormously entertaining story of how a fraudulent surgeon made a fortune by inserting goats' testes into impotent American men. So-called 'Doctor' John Brinkley became a world renowned authority on sexual rejuvenation in the 1920s, with famous politicians and even royalty asking for his services. His nemesis was Dr Morris Fishbein, editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association, but it took him fifteen years to destroy Brinkley in a dramatic courtroom showdown. In the meantime, despite mounting evidence that his quack treatments killed many patients, Brinkley became a millionaire and his pioneering use of radio not only kick-started country music as a national force in America, but invented the whole concept of radio advertising. He was the first politician to campaign from the air, when he ran for governor of Kansas (where else?)."

    In the newspaper article it described how in the depth of the depression Brinkley was clearing $14,000 a week - nearly $1 million a year. Fishbein had his sights set on Brinkley though, as exposing quack doctors was his crusade and thanks to his pressure the Kansas Medical Board withdrew Brinkley's licence. The story goes on and he moves to "TEXAS" and eventually in 1939 tempted fate too far by suing Fishbein for libel after he had published a book denouncing quacks and Brinkley in particular. From the witness box experts claimed his cures were worthless and Brinkley failed to sound convincing. (sounds familiar). Brinkley LOST the case, was declared bankrupt and later died of a heart attack.

    Here is an extract from another article which really hits home to me, especially the last sentence:

    "This, needless to say, is where Pope Brock's tale turns dark and cautionary, a reminder of the high price of gullibility and ignorance. These are aspects of human nature that just don't go away; even today, in the age of supposed medical enlightenment and sophistication, "rejuvenation is a global bazaar of infomercials and Web addresses, tools and toys for every need." John R. Brinkley may be long dead (since 1942), but his heirs in quackery continue to flourish."

    That's enough from me but read the above again and think about it. Who knows but unless someone does something about it, Nase like Brinkley could well be carrying out his deception for another 15 years.

    Here's that link again that Alex and Millie have posted: http://atgindsha01.atg.in.gov/cpd/complaint/complaint.html

    Thanks

    Peter

  3. #13
    Senior Member Peter's Avatar
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    Hello

    I posted on Friday about a article I had read on a charlatan from the 1920's called John Brinkley. Although I posted some abstracts from the article I scanned the whole piece today as it was so interesting and you can draw parallels with Nase (some comparisons apart from the obvious conman aspect I have highlighted in bold). Brinkley's story is really amazing and it makes you wonder what would have happened if Morris Fishbein hadn't decided to nail him. Here is the full article:

    "NEVER give a sucker an even break. The expression is American and so, come to think of it, is most of the language of quackery and conmanship: the sucker is also the prospect, the dupe, the mark, the rube, the greenhorn whom the grifter proposes to con using the spiel, the patter, the hooey, the 'convincer'.

    Charlatans, of course, flourished long before the founding of the home of the brave and the land of the free. But as Pope Brock, an American,points out: 'There has never been a more quack-prone and quack­ infested country than the United States.'

    They went West with the pioneers; before their dupes caught up with them, they were in the next town. 'Quacks weren't just accepted. They were joyously embraced, thanks to a perverse seam in the American mind,' according to Brock.

    Early in the 19th century, America celebrated the common man and despised the educated elite - the doctors and lawyers; Most states threw out their ­medical licensing requirements. Anyone could call himself a physician without accounting for the harm he did. The effect persisted for generations. In those early days, medicine was so primitive that quacks probably did no more harm than the qualified but deluded doctors. All this sets the scene for the greatest quack of all - the lauded, highly respected and hugely, rich Dr John Brinkley, who set up the Brinkley Institute of Health in 1918 in the small, obscure town of Milford, Kansas. Next to it, he kept a field of goats. He did sound work in the Spanish flu epidemic and had a good local reputation.

    Then Farmer Stittsworth, whose problem was impotence, agreed to secret surgery, carried out by night involving one of the goats. Under local anaesthetic, Dr Brinkley transferred the goat's testicles to the farmer's scrotum and off home he went. An anxious wait followed for them both. Then, Farmer Stittsworth announced suc­cess! Such success that Mrs Stittsworth requested a transplant of goat ovaries and subsequently produced a bouncing boy whom she named Billy, no doubt in honour of the goat.

    News like that gets around. Soon,they were pouring in off the train, the impotent and the wilting, to be met by Minnie, Brink­ley's wife and helpmeet. She later joined him, gowned and masked, to steady the patient on the operating table. They were a busy, devoted couple .

    Brinkley hailed from Hillbilly, North Carolina, and began life on the road as a 'Quaker doctor', who went among an audi­ence offering bottles of cure-all remedies for sale. He did receive a sort of medical training at one of the many Chicago medical schools - eventually buying himself a diploma,

    He was adept enough at minor surgery but ­an absolute genius at salesmanship. Radio was the latest thing, and Brinkley set up a radio station called KFKB ­Kansas First, Kansas Best. On this he extemporised folksy sermons and gave free diagnoses to listeners- who, in turn, recom­mended his services and prescriptions, available through their local chemists. Soon he had testimonials 'not just from country folk, but from the head of Chicago Law School and a sena­tor ('I wear goat glands myself and I'm proud of it") -

    In the depth of the Depression, Brinkley was Clearing $14,000 a week - nearly $1 million a year. But on his trail was another product of Chicago medical school named Morris Fishbein. He joined the American Medical Association (AMA), editing its journal and exposing quack doctors, which was his crusade. He set his sights primarily on Brinkley.

    Thanks to his pressure, the Kansas Medical Board watched Brinkley operate and withdrew his licence. He also lost his broadcast­ing permit. Undaunted, he ran for governor. Denouncing 'Fishy Fishbein' and the AMA as a bunch of crooks, he campaigned by plane and almost got elected. He moved to Texas and set up the most powerful radio station in America, just over the Mexican border where the law couldn't touch him.

    Although many patients sickened and several died as a result of infection following his surgery, many others declared their satisfaction. A question this book does not ask is: how come?

    Rejuvenation through monkey glands was quite the rage then. Was it due to psycholog­ical confidence that was implanted along with the balls? Today, Brinkley would be offering: buy one, get one free.

    There is a photograph of the Brinkleys cruising on one of their yachts (he also kept a fleet of 12 Cadillac's). They look an earnest, contented, self-satisfied couple who would not hurt a fly or tell a lie. He is in his yacht­ing cap with a Vandyke moustache and goatee beard to convey reassurance. Brinkley's only weakness was drink, under whose influ­ence he was known to grow violent.

    In, 1939 he finally tempted fate too far. Fishbein published a book denouncing quacks, and Brinkley in particular, and he sued Fishbein for libel. From the witness box experts claimed his cures were worthless and Brinkley failed to sound convincing. He lost, was declared bankrupt and died soon after of a heart attack. His loving last letters to Minnie show no remorse for their life of deception.

    Mr Brock describes with suitable bounce and sardonic gusto what Brinkley got away with. If it is only half true, he is still a mouth opening monument to American credulity. Are the Americans divided between wise guys and suckers with such an unduly large proportion of the latter?

    Well, it took them the majority of eight years to realise what they had chosen in George W. Bush."

    Yesterday on the "Never ending Q&A thread" on the RSF I asked the question:

    "Why do you think people fall for these tricksters? Is it gullibility and ignorance as stated or perhaps being desperate for help or a cure? Or maybe a combination of all three or possibly a totally different reason? Tell me why you think this still happens in this day and age?"


    This was the excellent reply from Melissa:

    "Because people are so desperate for relief that their mind fools them into believing that this person/clinic etc. has "the cure". Your mind can be a very powerfool (not a typo LOL) tool. Sometimes, out of desperation and unhappiness about your current situation you can fool yourself into trusting someone you would, under ordinary circumstances, stay away from with a 10 foot pole. Also, the heart can influence the mind so if in your heart you are so desperate for a cure your mind can be swayed."

    I think Melissa has really hit the nail on the head especially with "so desperate for a cure your mind can be swayed". You see this is what the medical frauds play on - the fact that people will trust them, will do anything and pay vast sums of money just because they believe they will be given the answer to their prayers. Nase has been doing this to rosacea sufferers when he refers them to Nielson's RTIT, with the promise "knock your rosacea out of the park". I find it totally sick and I hope someone with rosacea genuinely made worse by their treatments does complete the complaint form. Here it is again:

    http://atgindsha01.atg.in.gov/cpd/complaint/complaint.html

    Thanks

    Peter





    Last edited by Peter; 2nd March 2008 at 08:15 PM.

  4. #14
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    Thanks Peter - Nase hasn't updated his site since November 2007 - anyone heard anything new?

  5. #15
    Senior Member Peter's Avatar
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    Millie

    He is probably busy painting the walls of the new building / multiple treatment rooms and inventing new mumbo jumbo. Remember his last update:

    “We have also been very active in setting up the New Rosacea Institute building with its multiple treatment rooms (for various symptoms and triggers) and advancing our post laser care to include treatment with Pure Medical Grade oxygen, micellized antioxidants and aminoplex that helps prevent post laser inflammation, aid the healing process and thicken the epidermis. We utilize the latest technologies and the latest rosacea theories in a safe and effective way -- this is all we do, every day”.

    Hang on I forgot – Someone else must be painting because he never leaves his sofa in Indiana

    Peter

  6. #16
    Senior Member cashisclay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Millie View Post
    Thanks Peter - Nase hasn't updated his site since November 2007 - anyone heard anything new?
    The guy is just one big mystery to put it very nicely. It is hard for me to completely trash the guy since he was very nice to me on the phone and I actually never went through with treatment, but what a very odd individual.
    "Tomorrow the sun will rise. Who knows what the tide could bring?"

  7. #17
    Senior Member Peter's Avatar
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    Daniel

    Of course he will be very nice to you - think about it - he was hoping you would go through with the treatment because he wants your money. Like Mr Brinkley who I mentioned in the article above, he is a charlatan and a brilliant salesman. That's the way these frauds work and unfortunately people fall for it and get conned. Because of what you read on this Forum you were one of the lucky ones who saw through it but others will not be so lucky.

    Odd isn't the word I would use for a person who feigns cancer to gain a sympathy vote and dupes innocent people suffering from an incurable skin condition.

    Dr John Brinkley bought himself a diploma. Dr Geoffrey Nase PhD awarded himself a qualification (Rosacea Specialist) over the phone.

    http://www.debunkingnase.org/index.p...le=Credentials

    Read that I then see if you still think it "odd"?

    Anyway here is that link again:

    http://atgindsha01.atg.in.gov/cpd/co...complaint.html

    Peter

  8. #18
    Senior Member Peter's Avatar
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    Hello

    This is an interesting article:

    http://www.khou.com/news/local/stories/khou080227_tj_lasersurgery.375a612.html
    Laser surgery burns 11 News anchor


    It looks like there have been problems in Texas with the laser surgery on people’s faces.

    Points to note are:

    It appears that anybody can get hold of a machine and start treating people with it.

    Lasers are big business, big money. The industry is exploding.

    "The technology has come a long way. So, as the technology becomes easier to use, safer to use, a lot of these machines end up in the hands of people who may not know how to use them as well,” said Dr. Markus. This is why many Houston doctors have seen an increasing number of injured people desperately seeking help.

    In fact, that's exactly what Judy Nicklos did turn to Dr. Markus after a very scary experience at the hands of another person. "He said there will be slight bruising. Well, slight bruising was very painful, perfectly horrible,” said Nicklos, who was burned during her laser treatment.

    Also, people need to understand that even in the best hands, side effects can happen and nothing is a guarantee when it comes to medical procedures. The doctors we talked with say the best place to go to have an IPL or laser procedure is where they have a specialized interest in skin -- either a dermatologist or plastic surgeon's office.


    If we look at the RTIT we find that Nielson is an ETS surgeon not a dermatologist or skin specialist. Nase calls himself a Rosacea Specialist and Consultant but no such title or qualification exists. It’s the title he awarded himself over the telephone. See my previous post. Remember – Lasers are big bucks and the industry is exploding – and that’s the attraction for Nase and Nielson.

    Here is that link again:
    http://atgindsha01.atg.in.gov/cpd/complaint/complaint.html

    Thanks

    Peter

  9. #19
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    Hmmm......dr's promising news anchors excellent results, where the hell have i heard that before???

    oh yea--Dr Garza. he said he did ETS on several news anchors (since i was in radio/news i was an easy target)


    think I'll drop Ms Noland a note with my vid from FOX 26..I had hounded KHOU for years and they ignored me.


    Thanks Peter for posting this

  10. #20
    Senior Member Peter's Avatar
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    Hello Alex

    No problem - glad you found it interesting.

    To often people are being lied to or being promised the earth by some of these so called medical people just so they can “win the sale”. All the conmen are interested in, is the money they can earn and not the patients long term health.

    The power of the internet allows these people to advertise their products but it is also now enabling the patients to voice their complaints so as to expose the culprits to the World.

    I hope KHOU take notice of you next time.

    I was looking at that Indiana web site again and they seem pretty hot on internet fraud and I found this:

    http://www.in.gov/dfi/education/pdfs/internetfraud.pdf

    "Swindlers are attracted to the Internet because they can reach thousands of consumers inexpensively, quickly and anonymously. Few restrictions exist on the Internet, making it easy to place deceptive or misleading information online.


    Judging the accuracy and reliability of online information is a major challenge for consumers. False or misleading information related to personal finance or health issues, for example, could lead to serious consequences for unsuspecting consumers.


    E-mail scams
    involve individuals or companies intentionally misleading consumers or using deceptive marketing practices to gain the consumer's interest in their product. For example, the use of a particular product is advertised to cure a specific medical condition."

    Thanks

    Peter


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