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Thread: LED Choices

  1. #11
    Senior Member Twickle Purple's Avatar
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    There's a couple LED threads going on. I've posted this in the other but will include it here as well.

    --

    Here's a link to the PDF of an article, parts of it I've copies in below

    New Uses Emerge for
    Light-Emitting Diode Technology


    LED therapy is effective, non-invasive, painless, free of side
    effects, easy to apply, and well tolerated by all ages and
    all types of patients,” Dr. Calderhead said. “I think that
    LED therapy is the medicine of the new millennium.”
    ---

    The scientific literature demonstrates that infrared light penetrates tissue more effectively than visible light,” Dr. Calderhead added. “Intensity is also important, and LEDs are ideal in this regard. LED therapy is effective, non-invasive, painless, free of side effects, easy to apply, and well tolerated by all ages and all types of patients,” Dr. Calderhead said. “I think that LED therapy is the medicine of the new millennium.”

    ...

    Alternating red (633 nm) and blue LED light (415 nm) in a series of eight sessions shows promising results in the treatment of mild to severe acne, according to Tony Chu, M.D., consultant dermatologist, substituting presenter for Bruce Russell, M.D. “Dr. Russell showed that LED red-blue therapy gave significantly better results than blue light, oral antibiotics, and topical therapy,” Dr. Chu said. “Results with the LED included 81% reduction in lesion count at 12 weeks and marked reduction in pore size, with no damage to the sebaceous gland.” Dr. Chu is head of dermatology at Hammersmith Hospital in London. According to Dr. Chu, Propionibacterium acnes absorbs blue light, which reacts with intracellular coproporphyrin III to produce singlet oxygen which destroys only bacteria and not the surrounding tissue. “The rationale behind using red and blue light is that red light has been used for many years to accelerate healing in chronic leg ulcers and non-healing lesions,” Dr. Chu said. “It is thought to have an anti-inflammatory effect and to work via cytokine induction.” How red and blue light is used alternately reduces sebum excretion and post treatment flare-up needs to be further investigated, he added.

    ...

    “Initial clinical results suggest that the Omnilux LED system from PhotoTherapeutics, Inc. (Lake Forest, Calif., and Manchester, U.K.) will have a pivotal role in pain management,” according to R. Glen Calderhead, M.Sc., Ph.D., F.R.S.M. “Studies show that the pain transmission process can be attenuated by phototherapy,” said Dr. Calderhead. “The 830 nm light activates production of endorphins and blocks pain transmitting chemicals, causing non-narcotic analgesia. Recent studies have proven the efficacy of this wavelength in the management of sports and muscle injuries.

    Happiness is a choice.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Twickle Purple's Avatar
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    Where I have used Spectrum previously, substitute Wavelength, and you'll have it right ;)

    Photorejuvenation and Light Wavelengths



    White light or day light is made up of a spectrum of various waves of light. These waves are visible and invisible, ranging from violet and blue to red and infrared.

    The waves are described in nanometers (nm) such at 450 nanometers blue or 750 nanometers infrared.

    RED and INFRARED - The power of red/infrared LED devices is largely limited to current LED technology. Devices with LED's in the 625-630 nm range are inherently brighter than LED's in the 650-680 nm range.

    VIOLET/BLUE/GREEN - These wavelengths are now used in the treatment of acne. Clinical trials have show conclusively that the action of blue/green light kills P. acne bacteria.

    YELLOW/AMBER - Several manufacturers have elected to offer light wands in these wavelengths as an alternative to red/infrared or other skin related conditions (improving lymphatic drainage).

    Happiness is a choice.

  3. #13
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    Interesting...far as I know Dr. Chu is a well respected doctor. I have heard a lot about him over the last several years.

    Has anyone investigated the blue light? Is that OK for rosacea?

  4. #14
    Senior Member Twickle Purple's Avatar
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    I was told that the blue light can aggravate Rosacea by the fellow at Dermalux. It turns out that may not be the case though. I have read here of one user (fut) that uses it and finds it beneficial, and not aggravating at all.

    A 'net search will likely give you more details on that.

    Peter has posted that Dr. Chu is planning on conducting a study with RLT. Check out his thread: Red Light Clinical Trial at Hammersmith Hospital

    Happiness is a choice.

  5. #15
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    thread hijacking 8) Been using red light for a month and a half, 30-45 mins daily, very close to the panels...

    Seems to work!

    I'm still red but all my symptoms are reduced and I don't flush as easily, not sure how much more room for improvement there is tho... I was worried at first that being too close would make things worse (it seemed to be the case as I had small patches that became redder but eventually they settle down). After 45 mins the leds are only slightly warm plus I use a fan. It's really annoying to use tho... have to lay down on the floor without being able to do much. but another plus is that I'm also considering dropping clonidine!

    I had 10 IPLs sessions last year, no doubt that this is by far the quickest way to improve one's redness, but flushing persists... plus it's a freaking pain and bloody expensive too.

    No idea if RLT can help you if you're severely red but with IPL it's a killer combo. I wish I'd known about it when I was doing IPL.

    So where did I get mine ? from IowaDavid... I can't thank you enough man, without your reports on your own experience I wouldn't have bothered with it...
    It's not exactly a professionally build unit and I had to solder a few bits several times but the price was fair... you could setup a business if you improved the finishing , props to you!
    ------ Current routine ------
    cetaphil sensitive skin cleanser, linacare moisturizer, red light(660nm), 2 lemons, jojoba oil, IPL(10), AFT(9)

  6. #16
    Senior Member Twickle Purple's Avatar
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    I think I would have begged IowaDavid to build me one if I thought he would do it! He's got a really good set of instructions and is there to help in any (other) way though. Cheers and thanks to IowaDavid. Hip hip!!

    Ya, the boredom factor is there during the sessions. I think this is why some folks don't stick with it. I keep my iPod handy. Pop it into an external speaker unit (Bose, very handy with a remote) and the time passes quicker.

    Happiness is a choice.

  7. #17
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    Default LED

    hi thanks for the info Twickle Purple,

    Im very interesed in trying this, my main problem is flushing as well as burning senstaions my skin is not red all the time only gets it when i flush so i hope to find a LED soon as winter is coming and my skin is definley getting worse.

    I had 3 ipl treatments which made my skin worse im hoping i will be able to tolerate the LED light, im unsure what will be best for me if it will be all red or red and near infrared as i heard that is better for people who cant tolerate flurscent lights,though to be honest i could be totally wrong about that cant even remeber where i heard it. I would say when im under those kind of lights i do start to flush, does anyone else find that?

    Would it be better to start with a hand held then do a unit first my flush zone is mainly cheeks and nose.Has anyone found there LED devvices to cuase heat from them or be more red or flushed after?

    What sort of LED would you think be good for my skin i have these to links yet i dont have acne the acne lamp mainly talks about helping acne so i dont know what one to try for best or to go with just red or mainly nfared and some red.

    These are the links i have
    http://www.lighttherapyproducts.com/LEDtechnology.html

    some info on it -http://www.light4beauty.com/faq.html

    or the acne lamp http://www.acnelamp.com/ yet i dont have acne

    Any help on this i would be grateful too

    Thanks, sarah

  8. #18
    Senior Member fut's Avatar
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    i use the red and blue acne lamp and actually I do not really waste time with sessions now. I just hold the light to my face and go on my laptop while the light is working its magic.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Twickle Purple's Avatar
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    Hi Sarah,

    The decision of what wavelength to use comes down to personal choice based on need. I have no acne, just flushing and minor P+P, so I went with the 660nm wavelength. I had read enough on the combo of 660nm+880nm that I knew I would want to try this too, but not right away.

    The RLT does not remove my telangiectasia, for that I have Gemini done at my Derms. This has a traumatic effect on my face for a few days but is worth it for the good results I've seen so far. So I have laser (Gemini) and use RLT. While I'm really swollen from the Gemini I have not used the RLT. Once it started to subside though I was right back on it. I've posted this under my Gemini Tx thread under photos. I also use MetroCream and was on a 3 month course of doxycyline which I've just ended.

    I tried to include as much as I could for links to all the manufacturers that I'd come across so far (there are probably lots more) and the Web sites that I'd found and read on this 'technology' before I made my decision.

    I use different units than other members from what I've read posted so far. It seems that the most popular are Elixa (LED), Dermalux (flourescent tubes), AcneLamp (LED), and home built. I've talked about the ones that I have in their own links. The big Dimalux is really good and it is also the best demonstration that these babies don't burn. The smaller unit that I'm using has a programmable console and a couple different applicator types (single LED and multi-LED heads). So both require a more or less dedicated set-up.

    I hope that helps.
    Twickle Purple

    Happiness is a choice.

  10. #20
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    What are you finding, Fut?

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