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Thread: LED Choices

  1. #1
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    Default LED Choices

    With many products to choose from, I need some help.

    First, should we get red only?

    I was looking at this one and while its more expensive than others, I dont mind to pay for the ease of use. Would this fit my needs?

    http://www.acnelamp.com/product.php?id=1002

    As far as size goes,this may be smaller...but if it works I can always upgrade and it is money well spent.

    From their website I found this in the FAQ...I am certainly light sensitive.

    7. Will I Get a Sunburn or Skin Cancer?
    The peak wavelengths of light used in the Acnelamp are outside those that may cause damage to the skin. Persons hypersensitive to any amount of light should not use this product.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Twickle Purple's Avatar
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    Default Re: LED Choices

    Quote Originally Posted by hozer2k
    Persons hypersensitive to any amount of light should not use this product.
    This is very important and applies to both the fluorescent and LED models.

    --

    You can find units that are all blue, all red, blue + red, and red + near infrared. Loosely speaking, blue is for acne, the red is for inflammation and the near infrared penetrates deeper into the tissue than the red.

    My face skin type is dry and I'm very prone to flushing with minor P+P and lots of telangiectasia. I do not have acne and because the P+P and acne are so different so I didnít consider the blue for my skin.

    I know that Peter, who uses the Dermalux, started with a Blue + Red unit but eventually switched to all red.

    I have read posts here by members that have used the Red+Near-Infrared and have been very pleased with the results.

    I use the 660nm (red) on my face. I do not use the pulsing, I tried the pulsing option twice on my face and didnít like, I canít really explain why. Maybe Iíll try it again in the future.

    I have the red+near-infrared panels but have not tried it yet. Iím going one step at a time.

    --

    LINKS to sellers some consumer, some professional:



    And, thereís always eBay

    --

    LINKS to information about LED therapy in general:


    Happiness is a choice.

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    Generally speaking, is the efficacy of the products the same and its just a matter of convience at that point?

    If that is the case, would a smaller cost effective unit be a good choice to see if you respond well? This is my thought, but I want to make sure its still a good unit.

    THe $250 acne lamp seems easy to use and priced a little high, but still reasonable considering I spent $2500 on my recent IPL treatments.

    P.S. I meant sunlight...I dont have a problem with articficial light, so maybe its OK.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hozer2k
    If that is the case, would a smaller cost effective unit be a good choice to see if you respond well? This is my thought, but I want to make sure its still a good unit.
    That would be my thought too. Red light is red light is red light (within reason).

    I would only add that you might want to ensure that the device or approach you choose enables you to bathe your face in light without undue difficulty. Holding some lumpy array about the face for a quarter of an hour or so is enough to render a fellow red-faced with impatience.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Twickle Purple's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hozer2k
    P.S. I meant sunlight...I dont have a problem with articficial light, so maybe its OK.
    I got that. But, it's an important caution to folks that are sensitive to light, whether it be sunlight, flourescent lights, or what have you. These units are not suitable for those people.

    Quote Originally Posted by hozer2k
    Generally speaking, is the efficacy of the products the same and its just a matter of convience at that point?

    If that is the case, would a smaller cost effective unit be a good choice to see if you respond well? This is my thought, but I want to make sure its still a good unit.

    THe $250 acne lamp seems easy to use and priced a little high, but still reasonable considering I spent $2500 on my recent IPL treatments.
    I can't really comment from experience because I bought such a monster right out of the gate so I don't know what it's like to do smaller areas. But from the PMs and posts I've read it seems that folks are happy with the smaller units. The complaint being time and tediousness of application. This is why some who start with the acnelamp one head unit eventually buy the three head version.

    Some posters have compained that the $250 was very expensive and it didn't work for them. It is a lot of money, and you have put it into perspective with regards to cash outlay for other treatments. My comment on the ones that have said it didn't work is that I noted they didn't use it for very long and they didn't use it consistently.

    This investment is two-fold: time + money.

    I hope that helps.

    Twickle Purple

    Happiness is a choice.

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    Ultimately if the RLT works...then the price for a larger unit is not a big deal. But it seems logical to test it out with a minimal investment in case it turns out to be a dud or you have a reaction. In fact, I think its better in other aspects as well. I will use it on just one side of the face so that I can compare it to the untreated side.

    Arent a lot of people with rosacea light sensitive? So this seems to be somewhat contradictory to our condition.

    In any case, I am going to keep my fingers crossed.

  7. #7
    Senior Member fut's Avatar
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    Default

    great post twickle.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Twickle Purple's Avatar
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    Thanks fut there's enough there to keep us all reading for a good while!

    Quote Originally Posted by hozer2k
    Arent a lot of people with rosacea light sensitive? So this seems to be somewhat contradictory to our condition.
    I believe so. I know that I am very light sensitive, to sunlight. I feel scorched by the slightest exposure and it was made worse by the Doxycyline.

    Light is full spectrum, the therapy we are discussing are with individual spectrums.

    Red and Near Infrared have no UV. I believe that this is what most people are sensitive to. The caution that I repeated was for the folks who have immunological conditions causing photosensitivity.

    Happiness is a choice.

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    TP: Since you seem pretty familiar with the products and want something right out of the box like me...would you think the all red single acne lamp is a good choice for what I want to do then?

    If this does even half of what the claims are (heck even a quarter) then it would be worth it to me. I am surprised we dont have more people trying it.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Twickle Purple's Avatar
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    I think a lot of folks use it, they just aren't here on this forum. I can't really make a recommendation, I can just share everything I know, or if you lived on Vancouver Island, I could let you use my machine to see how it works for you.

    I think there are 3 things to consider when purchasing a unit: spectrum, convenience, cost/value

    SPECTRUM

    Decide which spectrum is best suited to your needs.

    CONVENIENCE

    Consider your sessions and how, where and when you will be using the unit. At night, in bed, a hand held unit can rest on your pillow and you can position your head and face according to the area you want coverage. If you want to use it during the day, let's say when you are at your desk or in front your computer, then the unit with a stand is best because you can just position it and keep focused on your tasks at hand (as long as you stay still.) I've set my units up in a room with a table that I lay on during my sessions. I make the room very dark so the light is focused and I get no other spectrum interference.

    COST/VALUE

    How many lights can you afford? Which unit gives you the most lights/output/dose for your money and still meets your other criteria?

    --

    I hope all this helps. Sorry for not answering your question directly.

    Twickle Purple

    Happiness is a choice.

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