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Thread: Red Light Therapy – Photon Tender TPB-300 Review

  1. #1
    Senior Member Twickle Purple's Avatar
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    Default Red Light Therapy – Photon Tender TPB-300 Review

    I will post on each of the 4 different units as they come in.
    The reviews will be ongoing.

    See the Dimalux Review here: http://forum.rosaceagroup.org/viewtopic.php?t=4118

    This is the second unit to arrive, the Photon Tender Skin Machine TPB-300



    Photo Tender Specification from the eBay listing:

    Display Functions:
    • a.) Output Monitor
      b.) Timer
      c.) Pulse - adjust frequency (0 - 64) pulses per second
      d.) Intensity Level (1-9)
      e.) Start/Stop
      f.) On/Off switch


    Components:
    • a.) One large probe (21 LED) PLUS one bonus large probe
      b.) One small probe (1 LED)
      c.) Cradle for probe
      d.) Full detailed written instructions and VCD instructions


    Specifications:
    • a.) Frequency - 50 / 60 HZ
      b.) Power - 13.5 W


    Total Cost (US$):
    • $649 (regular $1,299 according to the listing)
      Shipping to Canada $36.50
      Credit Card Charge $0.00
      1 Years parts and labor warranty $0.00
      Total $ 685.50


    Country of origin: China

    First Inspection

    This feels solid and substantial. It has enamel paint, which is evenly applied, and plastic and metal components -- all with a very tight fit and finish. An impressive and professional presentation. There are some sheets of paper included, a 1 paragraph overview of times for desired outcome, unintelligible instructions that were translated from Chinese and a CD with files in a format that neither my Mac nor IBM could read.

    Setup

    We set this up on the same table as the Dimalux. It was plugged into the same power bar and has proximity to the chair set aside for treatments.

    Initial Impressions

    I suspect the documentation discusses treatment but is intelligible to the point of entertaining, no output is discussed. An LCD display gives a sense of control, regardless that the settings are meaningless in terms of understanding the output.

    As I am presently testing the Dimalux on my face, with good results, I decide to test this unit against the pain and inflammation reducing qualities that RLT is also supposed to possess. I tested the unit on my left shoulder. I have a rotator cuff injury from a few years back and have limited range and chronic pain due to calcification.

    I turn the power bar on then the unit. The unit has a push button console with Start/Stop button with a light indicating state, up and down arrow buttons for Power Level with an LCD showing the level, a color keyed bar showing the output monitor, two pulse buttons to increase or decrease the pulses along with lit up indicators showing the number of pulses selected, and up and down arrows for timer selection with the time selected indicated in an LCD display above that.



    I used the large probe for 20 minutes around the front and back of the shoulder head. I pressed firmly against the tissue the whole time. Within 10 minutes I could feel a release of resistance and added mobility. After the 20 minutes I was able to move a range of motion not possible before the treatment. The change was very quick. My pain was not even a one, but a twinge is still in there. I will try the single probe on an arthritic joint tomorrow.



    So, my first impression after using this is positive. Not knowing output is a concern, there are no safeguards. However, touching the LEDs after 20 minutes of operation they were cool to the touch.

    Twickle Purple

  2. #2
    Senior Member Twickle Purple's Avatar
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    I use this about 50% of the time while I am using the Dimalux on my face. I hold it over lymph areas under my chin and collarbone or areas of skin that are giving me problems. One of the most dramatic surprises was a very large stretch mark compliments of steroid use, that is below my shoulder. I had propped the bigger handheld wand to that location and left it there for about 10 minutes to treat a muscle. I didn't think anything more until my husband brought it to my attention two nights ago. Half the 'rip' (because that's what it looks like) was so faint it was almost gone! This is about 3 inches long and 1/2 inch at the widest. It's nasty, and I've had it for years and it's always red and angry. I am not showing pictures of this

    Happiness is a choice.

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    Senior Member redhotoz's Avatar
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    Truly appreciate your reviews TP.

    Have you tried to contact the manufacturer to ask how to view the CD? Maybe they can e-mail you English version files, in a format that can be opened? It's always best to know exactly what you are using.

    Nice to hear that steroid stretch mark of yours has calmed down. Hey, also nice to know that your hubby is so observant! Please do keep us up-dated on this.

    Jen

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    Senior Member Twickle Purple's Avatar
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    Thank you Jen,

    It is so exciting that more and more folks are open to RLT and trying it. It amazes me that something so simple can be so, well, revolutionary in a way. The medical profession is just beginning to 'see the light' in terms of what this really does and can mean to our bodies and health. The understanding is incomplete but the universal consensus appears positive and extremely hopeful. I have purchased some very good clinical text books on laser and photo therapy and believe that what we are experiencing is a natural progression -- something the general public can take hold of and work with safely on our own. In this time of increased autonomy and self awareness in our personal health care, it is a potentially vital tool, something that replaces drugs and lets the body heal naturally.

    I need to purchase software to read the CD that came with this unit. I've tried the freebie conversion software but it didn't work. I just need to bite the bullet and pony up some money. I haven't contacted anyone, I'm a bit of a do-to-yourselfer. I just need to get around to it. I am very interested in what they show, maybe I can figure a way to save to WMV or something and post bits. I'll try to work on this over the weekend.

    RLT is all that I'd hoped for, and more. The fact that the little hand held works on my facial nerve pain was something completely unexpected. I really recommend this one for muscle and joint pain. I haven't taken 1 advil since it came, and typically I took 6 every day! I use the Photon-Tender for my non-facial skin (only becaue I use the Dimalux for that) and my muscle tissues. I use the Dimalux for skin right now, but see tissue improvement because it reduces edema all over, and will focus on deep tissue once I insert the 660/880nm panels. The little hand-held Warp10 is for muscles and joints, it's not made for skin application, it works on 'points' most effectively.

    I've got lots more work to do in terms of reading, there is one book in particular for musculo-skeletal injury which discusses very specific targets for a very long list of conditions. This is where I learned about the myofascial trigger points which I used the Warp10 on and this worked for my atypical facial neuralgia.

    I have had many folks express appreciation for these posts, and it is for that reason I will continue on as I have. I want to share everything I can on low level light therapy. For me it is making a difference. I hope it can for others.

    Twickle Purple

    -----

    Here's a link to the PDF of an article, parts of it I've copies in below

    New Uses Emerge for
    Light-Emitting Diode Technology


    Quote:
    LED therapy is effective, non-invasive, painless, free of side
    effects, easy to apply, and well tolerated by all ages and
    all types of patients,” Dr. Calderhead said. “I think that
    LED therapy is the medicine of the new millennium.”

    ---

    The scientific literature demonstrates that infrared light penetrates tissue more effectively than visible light,” Dr. Calderhead added. “Intensity is also important, and LEDs are ideal in this regard. LED therapy is effective, non-invasive, painless, free of side effects, easy to apply, and well tolerated by all ages and all types of patients,” Dr. Calderhead said. “I think that LED therapy is the medicine of the new millennium.”

    ...

    Alternating red (633 nm) and blue LED light (415 nm) in a series of eight sessions shows promising results in the treatment of mild to severe acne, according to Tony Chu, M.D., consultant dermatologist, substituting presenter for Bruce Russell, M.D. “Dr. Russell showed that LED red-blue therapy gave significantly better results than blue light, oral antibiotics, and topical therapy,” Dr. Chu said. “Results with the LED included 81% reduction in lesion count at 12 weeks and marked reduction in pore size, with no damage to the sebaceous gland.” Dr. Chu is head of dermatology at Hammersmith Hospital in London. According to Dr. Chu, Propionibacterium acnes absorbs blue light, which reacts with intracellular coproporphyrin III to produce singlet oxygen which destroys only bacteria and not the surrounding tissue. “The rationale behind using red and blue light is that red light has been used for many years to accelerate healing in chronic leg ulcers and non-healing lesions,” Dr. Chu said. “It is thought to have an anti-inflammatory effect and to work via cytokine induction.” How red and blue light is used alternately reduces sebum excretion and post treatment flare-up needs to be further investigated, he added.

    ...

    “Initial clinical results suggest that the Omnilux LED system from PhotoTherapeutics, Inc. (Lake Forest, Calif., and Manchester, U.K.) will have a pivotal role in pain management,” according to R. Glen Calderhead, M.Sc., Ph.D., F.R.S.M. “Studies show that the pain transmission process can be attenuated by phototherapy,” said Dr. Calderhead. “The 830 nm light activates production of endorphins and blocks pain transmitting chemicals, causing non-narcotic analgesia. Recent studies have proven the efficacy of this wavelength in the management of sports and muscle injuries.

    Happiness is a choice.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Twickle Purple's Avatar
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    This site is geared to veterinarians, as they have been using this since the early 70s. Anyone interested in LLLT should read articles regarding this usage, this is akin to animals 'trials' and has the most information. It also references human studies.

    http://www.emersonww.com/LaserFAQs.htm

    An excerpt:

    Q. Are there any negative effects from LLLT?

    A. In all the years that low level lasers have been tested in research and clinical applications, no adverse side effects or negative impacts have been reported. This is why the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) classifies lasers like the Respond Laser Therapy Systems as “Non-Significant Risk” devices, requiring a minimum of safety precautions. The only precaution is that which discourages direct viewing of the laser beam. Care should be exercised not to stare into the laser beam or to point it at the eyes, and the use of safety glasses is recommended.

    Q. How long have low level lasers been used for therapy?

    A. Low level lasers have been used by doctors in hospitals and clinics in Europe on both humans and animals since the early 1970’s. In fact, the first studies reporting positive effects of laser on wound healing in rats were reported by the Hungarian researcher Andre Mester as early as 1968. In the United States, therapeutic lasers have been used by veterinarians since the late 1970’s. Just recently the U.S. FDA has given marketing approval to laser therapy devices for human use, beginning the trend to widespread use of LLLT in the United States.

    Q. In simple terms, what does LLLT do?

    A. A huge amount of research data has been collected on the effects of laser therapy (over 2000 double-blind studies) both in laboratory and clinical settings. The following excerpts demonstrate some of the most significant results: (Check the bibliography if you would like to do some in-depth reading.)

    1. Wound healing is significantly improved by low level laser therapy, even non-healing wounds, thought to be due to the increased level of collagen brought about by laser treatment. Collagen, the chief constituent of connective tissue, is recognized as the most important ingredient in wound healing. See Dr. Andre F. Mester and Dr. Adam Mester, LLLT and Wound Healing, John Wiley and Sons, Ltd., 1989.

    2. Increases in blood flow by means of capillary and arterial widening of the lumen of blood vessels, vasodilatation. See Dr. Toshiaki Kami, Effects of Low Power Diode Lasers, Annals of Plastic Surgery, Vol. 14, No. 3, March 1985. (Dr. Kami’s work also showed that the laser light significantly increased the formation of new capillary paths in treated areas, which resulted in increased circulation.)

    3. Marked improvement in re-establishment of the lymphatic system after trauma, resulting in reduction of swelling. This is due to the evacuation of dirty proteins by the regenerated lymphatic vessels. (See Dr. P.C. Lieven, The Influence of Laser on the Lymphatic Systems, Presented at the American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Eight Annual Meeting, Dallas, Texas 4/25-4/28, 1988)

    4. Laser light stimulates release of the body’s own killing chemicals such as endorphins and enkephalins Facilitating natural, long lasting pain relief. Dr. Wolfgang Rauermeister, Director of Pain Control Center at Parkwood Hospital, Massachusetts, USA has provided the best explanation of these pain reduction capabilities:
    “The laser light stimulates the release of the body’s own pain killing chemicals such as endorphins and enkephalins from the brain, adrenal glands, and other areas, thus facilitating long lasting pain relief.”

    Low level laser therapy is an effective therapy, working in harmony with the body’s own healing and relieving mechanisms. There are no harmful side effects reported from laser therapy.

    Happiness is a choice.

  6. #6
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    TP or anybody else who might have happened upon it:

    What is the supposed depth of penetration of LED light at the higher end of the spectrum (infrared +)?

    I suppose it must depend on the nature of the tissue: bone, muscle, blubber or whatever.

    Thanks.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Twickle Purple's Avatar
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    Hi GJ,

    It depends on the variables: the power output is a factor, the number LEDs, brightness of the LEDs, etc. I never considered the blubber factor I guess I'll need to keep it on the 'denser' parts for a bit longer.

    Check this page out -- Figure 1 and 2 give a quick illustration.

    Happiness is a choice.

  8. #8
    Senior Member IowaDavid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twickle Purple
    This site is geared to veterinarians, as they have been using this since the early 70s. Anyone interested in LLLT should read articles regarding this usage, this is akin to animals 'trials' and has the most information. It also references human studies.

    http://www.emersonww.com/LaserFAQs.htm

    An excerpt:

    Q. Are there any negative effects from LLLT?

    A. In all the years that low level lasers have been tested in research and clinical applications, no adverse side effects or negative impacts have been reported. This is why the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) classifies lasers like the Respond Laser Therapy Systems as “Non-Significant Risk” devices, requiring a minimum of safety precautions. The only precaution is that which discourages direct viewing of the laser beam. Care should be exercised not to stare into the laser beam or to point it at the eyes, and the use of safety glasses is recommended.

    Q. How long have low level lasers been used for therapy?

    A. Low level lasers have been used by doctors in hospitals and clinics in Europe on both humans and animals since the early 1970’s. In fact, the first studies reporting positive effects of laser on wound healing in rats were reported by the Hungarian researcher Andre Mester as early as 1968. In the United States, therapeutic lasers have been used by veterinarians since the late 1970’s. Just recently the U.S. FDA has given marketing approval to laser therapy devices for human use, beginning the trend to widespread use of LLLT in the United States.

    Q. In simple terms, what does LLLT do?

    A. A huge amount of research data has been collected on the effects of laser therapy (over 2000 double-blind studies) both in laboratory and clinical settings. The following excerpts demonstrate some of the most significant results: (Check the bibliography if you would like to do some in-depth reading.)

    1. Wound healing is significantly improved by low level laser therapy, even non-healing wounds, thought to be due to the increased level of collagen brought about by laser treatment. Collagen, the chief constituent of connective tissue, is recognized as the most important ingredient in wound healing. See Dr. Andre F. Mester and Dr. Adam Mester, LLLT and Wound Healing, John Wiley and Sons, Ltd., 1989.

    2. Increases in blood flow by means of capillary and arterial widening of the lumen of blood vessels, vasodilatation. See Dr. Toshiaki Kami, Effects of Low Power Diode Lasers, Annals of Plastic Surgery, Vol. 14, No. 3, March 1985. (Dr. Kami’s work also showed that the laser light significantly increased the formation of new capillary paths in treated areas, which resulted in increased circulation.)

    3. Marked improvement in re-establishment of the lymphatic system after trauma, resulting in reduction of swelling. This is due to the evacuation of dirty proteins by the regenerated lymphatic vessels. (See Dr. P.C. Lieven, The Influence of Laser on the Lymphatic Systems, Presented at the American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Eight Annual Meeting, Dallas, Texas 4/25-4/28, 1988)

    4. Laser light stimulates release of the body’s own killing chemicals such as endorphins and enkephalins Facilitating natural, long lasting pain relief. Dr. Wolfgang Rauermeister, Director of Pain Control Center at Parkwood Hospital, Massachusetts, USA has provided the best explanation of these pain reduction capabilities:
    “The laser light stimulates the release of the body’s own pain killing chemicals such as endorphins and enkephalins from the brain, adrenal glands, and other areas, thus facilitating long lasting pain relief.”

    Low level laser therapy is an effective therapy, working in harmony with the body’s own healing and relieving mechanisms. There are no harmful side effects reported from laser therapy.
    That excerpt is about Low Level Laser Therapy; LEDs are Low Level Light Therapy.

    I'm still a bit confused on how the two differ, but I'm fairly certain they're two different things.
    35 year-old male
    Erythmatotelangiectatic rosacea & Ocular
    20 + laser treatments.
    Toleraine Soothing Light Facial Fluid for moisturizer. I don't use a special cleanser. Clonidine daily; klonopin sometimes.
    BEST and CURRENT TREATMENT I use: Low-Level Red Light Therapy LED array.
    Please feel free to PM me with your low-level red light therapy (LLRLT) questions. I'm happy to help if I can.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Twickle Purple's Avatar
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    An LED and a laser device using 660nm wavelength light will create the same response in the body. The difference is coherent and non-coherent light.

    Here's a copy and paste from this site that explains it succinctly:

    Monochromatic single wavelength light can only be produced in two ways - Low Power/Cold Laser (coherent light) or with a powerful light-emitting diode, LED (non-coherent light). Although much of the low power laser research is directly applicable to the use of LED's, LED's non-coherent light is entirely safe.

    Dr Tiina Karu, of the Laser Technology Centre of Russia, found in the late 80's that the non-coherent light (LED's) was found to be as effective as coherent light and without the risk associated with cold lasers.

    Happiness is a choice.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twickle Purple
    Hi GJ,

    It depends on the variables: the power output is a factor, the number LEDs, brightness of the LEDs, etc. I never considered the blubber factor I guess I'll need to keep it on the 'denser' parts for a bit longer.

    Check this page out -- Figure 1 and 2 give a quick illustration.
    Thankyou, TP.

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