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is this ocular rosacea?

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  • is this ocular rosacea?

    I've posted here before about my rosacea on my face but now I have a question for others about ocular rosacea.

    My eyes have long been very light sensitive (don't like it and tear a lot)which I understand could be a symptom of ocular rosacea. Over the last few months I have started getting something new though - I can only describe as a sticky eye. Sometimes I rub my eyes inadvertently while washing them and then open them again to find I have lost vision in one eye for a few minutes. During the day, my eye also feels, well juststicky, like there is a sticky film in it. It doesn't feel gritty or like I have an irritant in it (like an eyelash), it is not red, there is no discharge and it only effects one eye. Unfortunetely I am partially sighted and it's affecting the only eye I see out of.

    Is this ocular rosacea? I am assuming it is. If so, what type of eye drops do I need? I asked at the chemist for TheraTears which I have seen recommended but she hadn't heard of them and instead suggested I try hydromellose (sp?) instead which she said are artificial tears of the type the doctor usually prescribes. They don't seem to help though.

    Any advice welcomed.

    Thanks

  • #2
    You should get to an Eye Doctor ASAP, don't chance it by guessing what's wrong, your eyesight is too important, especialy since you've already got partial sight loss problems.

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    • #3
      it's not straightforward as it will take a week to get a gp appt then he will have to refer me to a specialist and last time that took 3 months. unless he just prescribes antibiotic drops perhaps?

      i called my optician who i could see tomorrow but they said they don't treat eye disease so couldn't advise. hence I thought I might get quicker (and likely more informed) help here!

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      • #4
        Is this ocular rosacea

        At some point, if things don't get better, you should consider taking tetracycline. I have severe ocular rosacea which only stabilized once I took antibioitics. I never had any facial syptoms of rosacea. For that reason, it took doctors over three years to diagnose me and I suffered damage to my eyes as a result.

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        • #5
          Hi Thursday - are you from the UK?

          I am seeing my GP this week to see about problems I 've been having with my eyes (hope the waiting list is not too long).

          Before this though - I did speak with my optician, who examined my eyes quite closely & told me that the surface of my eyes were quite dry and also picked up on some mild blepharitis in one eye which would likely be contributing to the irritation/redness. It is true they can't treat the problems, other than recommending eye drops etc but I still found it reassuring to have an idea what problems I was dealing with. They do know a lot - even if they cant prescribe anything.

          I have been using Thera tears and they do help make my eyes feel a bit more comfortable and I don't seem to react to them at all, Whereas hypromellose did bother me (probably because of the preservatives) If your eyes are not sore and gritty though, I wouldnt of thought artificial tears would help that much - since they are basically replacing moisture.

          Hope you work it out - Its really irritating when you have eye irritation.

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          • #6
            I was reccommended to use CelluVisc eye drops to help reduce irritation in ocular rosacea. These drops are much more viscous than normal artificial tears, so coat the eye better for a longer time. However, it is difficult to see for a minute or two after applying, since it is so thick.

            For me ocular rosacea appeared as blepharitis (inflammation around the base of the eyelashes), which soon led to irritation of the cornea. I don't know if what you describe can also be attributed to rosacea, but any damage to the cornea can be very dangerous if not treated, so definitely don't waste any time making an appointment. After my opthamologist realized my problem was not going away with the usual antibiotic drops and tears, she sent me to the emergency opthamology dept at the public hospital, where they immediately recognized it as rosacea.

            This was in fact what made me take notice of my facial rosacea, after trying to ignore it and hope it would go away for years and years. Red cheeks I can live with, but a potentially blinding condition is not something to take lightly.

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            • #7
              I was reccommended to use CelluVisc eye drops to help reduce irritation in ocular rosacea. These drops are much more viscous than normal artificial tears, so coat the eye better for a longer time. However, it is difficult to see for a minute or two after applying, since it is so thick.

              For me ocular rosacea appeared as blepharitis (inflammation around the base of the eyelashes), which soon led to irritation of the cornea. I don't know if what you describe can also be attributed to rosacea, but any damage to the cornea can be very dangerous if not treated, so definitely don't waste any time making an appointment. After my opthamologist realized my problem was not going away with the usual antibiotic drops and tears, she sent me to the emergency opthamology dept at the public hospital, where they immediately recognized it as rosacea.

              This was in fact what made me take notice of my facial rosacea, after trying to ignore it and hope it would go away for years and years. Red cheeks I can live with, but a potentially blinding condition is not something to take lightly.

              Comment


              • #8
                I was reccommended to use CelluVisc eye drops to help reduce irritation in ocular rosacea. These drops are much more viscous than normal artificial tears, so coat the eye better for a longer time. However, it is difficult to see for a minute or two after applying, since it is so thick.

                For me ocular rosacea appeared as blepharitis (inflammation around the base of the eyelashes), which soon led to irritation of the cornea. I don't know if what you describe can also be attributed to rosacea, but any damage to the cornea can be very dangerous if not treated, so definitely don't waste any time making an appointment. After my opthamologist realized my problem was not going away with the usual antibiotic drops and tears, she sent me to the emergency opthamology dept at the public hospital, where they immediately recognized it as rosacea.

                This was in fact what made me take notice of my facial rosacea, after trying to ignore it and hope it would go away for years and years. Red cheeks I can live with, but a potentially blinding condition is not something to take lightly.

                Comment


                • #9
                  thanks all. just to update, I saw my optician this week who said that although I don't hve all the classic symptoms of eye infection (eg discharge), b/c I have rosacea, they wouldn't even look any further for diagnosis of my eye problems - in his opinion, it's just bound to be that.

                  He has referred me to an opthomologist though for a second opinion and so I can get some advice about and access to different drops.

                  I have since bought some Brolene eye drops and find them quite effective actually (though they do sting). Much better than hypromellose (presumably b/c treating different problem)

                  NikkiLou - I am from the UK. For reference, can you tell me where you got the Theratears just in case I need them later?

                  thanks

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                  • #10
                    Hi

                    Sure, there is only one importer in the UK I believe - Mathesons Optometrists.

                    Just google them and they have a website with a phone number you can call to order them. They are good, but they are quite expensive £8.49 + post & packing for 24 x 0.6ml single vials. Which dont last very long if you're using them regularly and as far as I know, you can't get these on prescription.

                    It doesn't really sound to me as though you need them anyway - if the hypromellose didnt help at all. Dry eyes doesnt seem to be a problem for your.

                    Just a word of warning about the Brolene - dont use it on a regular basis as the preservative in it can irritate and eventually damage the surface of your eye - this is only with prolonged use though. My optician told me this.

                    Nikki

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