Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Hypochlorous Acid Spray can be 99.9% effective in clearing bacteria, fungus and demod

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Hypochlorous Acid Spray can be 99.9% effective in clearing bacteria, fungus and demod

    Hypochlorous Acid Spray can be 99.9% effective in clearing bacteria, fungus and demodex skin mite nymphs from the skin surface.
    Study papers below show that Hypochlorous Acid Spray in 0.01% to 0.02% concentration kills 99.9% of tested microbes in just 60 seconds.

    Hypochlorous Acid Spray in 0.01% to 0.02% concentration is non-irritating to the skin and eyes.
    Usage: Spray on clean face and let dry before applying other products.

    1. Hypochlorous Acid Spray in 0.01% to 0.2% concentration available on Amazon.

    USE: Spray solution on face and eyes to treat acne, sebhorreic dermatitis, rosacea Sub Type 2 caused by surface bacteria, surface fungus or demodex skin mites.

    Several of the Hypochlorous Acid Spray products available on Amazon:
    1. Briotech Topical skin spray (0.02% Hypochlorous Acid) - 4 oz - $11.95 ($2.99/Fl Oz)
    2. OccuSOFT HypoChlor (0.02% Hypochlorous Acid) 2 oz - $19.55 ($9.78/Fl Oz)
    3. Heydrate Lid and Lash Cleaner (0.015% Hypochlorous Acid) - 4 oz - $49.97 ($12.49/Fl Oz)

    Here's a paper from NIH that shows the powerful fungicidal action:

    Results: 0.01% hypochlorous acid is rapidly fungicidal, reducing the number of viable yeast cells or mold conidia by at least 99.99% within 60 seconds. The antifungal activity extended to all molds (Acremonium kiliense, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Fusarium solani, Mucor indicus) and yeast species (Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis) tested.

    Here's a paper showing the powerful antimicrobial action of Hypochlorous Acid:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4636962/

    Here's a paper showing the powerful antimicrobial action of Hypochlorous Acid for cleaning contact lenses:
    https://iovs.arvojournals.org/articl...icleid=2766523

    Here's a paper showing the powerful antifungal action of Hypochlorous Acid:

    https://256edc4208.nxcli.net/does-hy...d-kill-fungus/

  • #2
    ElaineA,
    Nice research investigation. I may be missing something, but in the papers you cited I don't see HOCl eliminating demodex. So I did a google search and found this one:

    "HOCl has potent antimicrobial properties. Laboratory studies show that it effectively kills the nymph form of the Demodex mites, as well as the Bacillus oleronius and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria that live on eyelids and that are found inside the Demodexgut. In addition, HOCl also neutralizes the inflammatory toxins released by both mites and bacteria." New Medical Life Sciences
    Last edited by Brady Barrows; 29 December 2020, 04:16 PM.
    Brady Barrows
    Blog - Join the RRDi


    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Brady Barrows View Post
      ElaineA,
      Nice research investigation. I may be missing something, but in the papers you cited I don't see HOCl eliminating demodex. So I did a google search and found this one:

      "HOCl has potent antimicrobial properties. Laboratory studies show that it effectively kills the nymph form of the Demodex mites, as well as the Bacillus oleronius and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria that live on eyelids and that are found inside the Demodexgut. In addition, HOCl also neutralizes the inflammatory toxins released by both mites and bacteria." New Medical Life Sciences
      Excellent addition to the list! I knew from past reading and my own experience that HOCL works against demodex in the nymph form. I read a review on Amazon of the BRIOTech HOCL spray where a person said it cleared their Seb D. People using it after piercings also swear by it to help avoid infections. That set me off on a Google search to find scientific/medical papers. I was totally amazed at how fast and how well HOCL has been proven to work against a broad range of bacteria and fungus. The best part is that its a substance the human body makes. Unlikely for anyone to have a bad reaction to it. HOCL was used during WWI to disinfect and clean battle wounds when they had no antibiotics to treat infections.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by ElaineA View Post
        Excellent addition to the list! I knew from past reading and my own experience that HOCL works against demodex in the nymph form. I read a review on Amazon of the BRIOTech HOCL spray where a person said it cleared their Seb D. People using it after piercings also swear by it to help avoid infections. That set me off on a Google search to find scientific/medical papers. I was totally amazed at how fast and how well HOCL has been proven to work against a broad range of bacteria and fungus. The best part is that its a substance the human body makes. Unlikely for anyone to have a bad reaction to it. HOCL was used during WWI to disinfect and clean battle wounds when they had no antibiotics to treat infections.
        Please don?t use this. No trials with human beings. Don?t be a guinea pig. Remember you have an extra sensitive skin, don?t play monkey games with it

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by ElaineA View Post
          Hypochlorous Acid Spray can be 99.9% effective in clearing bacteria, fungus and demodex skin mite nymphs from the skin surface.
          Study papers below show that Hypochlorous Acid Spray in 0.01% to 0.02% concentration kills 99.9% of tested microbes in just 60 seconds.

          Hypochlorous Acid Spray in 0.01% to 0.02% concentration is non-irritating to the skin and eyes.
          Usage: Spray on clean face and let dry before applying other products.

          1. Hypochlorous Acid Spray in 0.01% to 0.2% concentration available on Amazon.

          USE: Spray solution on face and eyes to treat acne, sebhorreic dermatitis, rosacea Sub Type 2 caused by surface bacteria, surface fungus or demodex skin mites.

          Several of the Hypochlorous Acid Spray products available on Amazon:
          1. Briotech Topical skin spray (0.02% Hypochlorous Acid) - 4 oz - $11.95 ($2.99/Fl Oz)
          2. OccuSOFT HypoChlor (0.02% Hypochlorous Acid) 2 oz - $19.55 ($9.78/Fl Oz)
          3. Heydrate Lid and Lash Cleaner (0.015% Hypochlorous Acid) - 4 oz - $49.97 ($12.49/Fl Oz)

          Here's a paper from NIH that shows the powerful fungicidal action:

          Results: 0.01% hypochlorous acid is rapidly fungicidal, reducing the number of viable yeast cells or mold conidia by at least 99.99% within 60 seconds. The antifungal activity extended to all molds (Acremonium kiliense, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Fusarium solani, Mucor indicus) and yeast species (Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis) tested.

          Here's a paper showing the powerful antimicrobial action of Hypochlorous Acid:
          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4636962/

          Here's a paper showing the powerful antimicrobial action of Hypochlorous Acid for cleaning contact lenses:
          https://iovs.arvojournals.org/articl...icleid=2766523

          Here's a paper showing the powerful antifungal action of Hypochlorous Acid:

          https://256edc4208.nxcli.net/does-hy...d-kill-fungus/
          Thanks for posting this excellent information.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Helper View Post
            Please don?t use this. No trials with human beings. Don?t be a guinea pig. Remember you have an extra sensitive skin, don?t play monkey games with it
            Your assertions about HOCL are incorrect. Here's an article on Hypochlorous Acid (HOCL) to help inform you of the verified facts about HOCL: https://www.hypochlorousacid.com/about

            HOCL is made by the human body's white cells in response to a scrape. The human body makes HOCL and has always done so. HOCL is non-toxic, non-irritating, extremely safe, and best of all highly effective at treating a broad range of skin infections. HOCL has been used by humans for over 100 years as a disinfectant. HOCL was famously used to clean and disinfect battle field wounds in World War I. HOCL is currently in wide scale use to disinfect medical and dental offices. For surface sanitation, HOCL has recently been shown to kill the COVID virus in 30 seconds on surfaces. HOCL is the ingredient in the former prescription drug Avenova for killing the nymph form of demodex. HOCL was tested for FDA compliance and safety by the NovaBay Pharmaceutical Company that produces Avenova.

            Many Rosaceans suffer from multiple skin problems including Seborrheic Dermatitis and Tinea fungal infections. Yet they struggle to find a product that they can use for treatment that is non-irritating and non-drying.

            At the 0.01% to 0.02% concentration, HOCL facial spray can be an ideal product for use by Rosaceans since it is non-toxic, non-irritating, non-drying and non-allergenic. It kills bacteria, fungus/mold, viruses, and the nymph form of demodex skin mites. HOCL has been shown to kill the MRSA bacteria and black mold. Yet HOCL doesn't kill "good bacteria" needed for a healthy balance in the skin microbiome. Piercers and tattoo artists swear by HOCL skin spray products to prevent infections after piercings and tattoos.

            Over 30 years of research exists for the use of hypochlorous acid and new research is being published every year. Over 300 published research articles on the use of hypochlorous acid are available.
            Current commercial production uses electrolysis to synthetically generate the HOCL acid, identical to what is produced by the human body. The product is vegan. The Safety Data Sheets (SDS) on these products show ZERO safety concerns.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Helper View Post
              Please don?t use this. No trials with human beings. Don?t be a guinea pig. Remember you have an extra sensitive skin, don?t play monkey games with it
              "In a recent study, a saline hygiene solution preserved with pure hypochlorous acid was shown to reduce the bacterial load significantly without altering the diversity of bacterial species on the eyelids. After 20 minutes of treatment, there was >99% reduction of the Staphylococci bacteria."


              Stroman, D. W; Mintun, K; Epstein, A. B; Brimer, C. M; Patel, C. R; Branch, J. D; Najafi-Tagol, K (2017). "Reduction in bacterial load using hypochlorous acid hygiene solution on ocular skin". Clinical Ophthalmology. 11: 707?714. doi:10.2147/OPTH.S132851. PMC 5402722. PMID 28458509.
              More information

              Et Cetera
              Brady Barrows
              Blog - Join the RRDi


              Comment


              • #8
                Thank you for taking the time to make this thread, ElaineA - a great resource.

                I have looked into HOCI in the past (I use a HOCI spray on my eyelids) and while I think it has some great benefits, I've never found any studies that establish that it is an effective killer of demodex. I read the article posted by Brady but there doesn't seem to be any source cited for the claim that HOCI is a demodex killer.

                To the contrary, in the following study (see https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6689564/), HOCI and tea-tree oil eyelid wipes were put head-to-head, with the paper concluding:

                T4O demonstrated a mean kill time of 40?0.0 mins. HOCI had a mean kill time of 87.86?4.23 mins, with 79% of samples surviving the full 90 mins. In the MO group [mineral oil], all samples survived through the 90 min mark. Kill time was statistically significant in favor of T4O [tea-tree oil based wipe] as compared to HOCl (p=0.0005). There was no statistically significant difference in kill time between HOCl and MO (p=0.25).

                Conclusion

                4% T4O effectively killed all adult mite samples within 40 mins of exposure. In contrast, the demodicidal activity of 0.01% HOCl was minimal, and comparatively similar to 100% MO.
                So while it seems that HOCI did have some action against demodex in this study, it was only minimally effective.

                In addition, I came across this commentary which strongly argues that, while beneficial for the skin in other ways, HOCI has no clinically-proven effectiveness against demodex (see: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6181810/). It is a short article and worth reading in its entirely, but it basically concludes that:

                The myth that hypochlorous acid has any significant demodicidal activity has been intimated and perpetuated for several years, primarily in marketing materials and ?advertorials? related to Avenova?. However, there is no clinical evidence to support this assertion. To the contrary, my laboratory has demonstrated that 0.1% hypochlorous acid solution has virtually no effect on live, adult Demodex mites in vitro ... While hypochlorous acid solution can be an effective therapy in anterior and posterior blepharitis associated with an excessive bacterial bioburden, it remains a poor therapeutic option in the management of demodicosis.
                Taking everything in, it seems to me that HOCI's benefits lie in controlling the by-product of demodex (i.e. the bacteria etc), rather than the demodex themselves? Has anyone come across any clinical papers that establish HOCI's demodicidal activity?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Dutch1 View Post
                  Thank you for taking the time to make this thread, ElaineA - a great resource.

                  I have looked into HOCI in the past (I use a HOCI spray on my eyelids) and while I think it has some great benefits, I've never found any studies that establish that it is an effective killer of demodex. I read the article posted by Brady but there doesn't seem to be any source cited for the claim that HOCI is a demodex killer.

                  To the contrary, in the following study (see https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6689564/), HOCI and tea-tree oil eyelid wipes were put head-to-head, with the paper concluding:



                  So while it seems that HOCI did have some action against demodex in this study, it was only minimally effective.

                  In addition, I came across this commentary which strongly argues that, while beneficial for the skin in other ways, HOCI has no clinically-proven effectiveness against demodex (see: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6181810/). It is a short article and worth reading in its entirely, but it basically concludes that:



                  Taking everything in, it seems to me that HOCI's benefits lie in controlling the by-product of demodex (i.e. the bacteria etc), rather than the demodex themselves? Has anyone come across any clinical papers that establish HOCI's demodicidal activity?
                  HOCL works a different and less irritating way than tea tree oil. HOCL takes longer than tea tree oil for the impact to be measurable. The HOCL kills the nymph (juvenile) form of the demodex skin mite HOCL. So HOCL has no known impact on the adults. HOCL just kills the nymphs in the 5 to 6 days between hatching and becoming an adult. It kills the nymphs before they turn into adults and start breeding more demodex. The impact of HOCL on demodex is to more slowly cut back on the demodex breeding population. As adults die at the end of their 14-21 day life cycle, very few demodex have survived to replace them. The impact of this approach could take several life cycles to notice that it has helped. Tea tree oil and clove oil are indeed effective in killing all hatched demodex at any age and doing it in a faster more measurable way. Apparently nothing has been found to work on killing the eggs before they hatch.

                  The combined 2 drug, 2 week oral treatment with Oral Ivermectin + Oral Metronidazole is highly effective at clearing demodex. This treatment works by killing the adults+nymphs the first week and then killing the hatchlings the second week before they can start breeding.

                  As you say, killing the bacteria that the mites may consume is another beneficial effect of the HOCL.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ElaineA View Post
                    The HOCL kills the nymph (juvenile) form of the demodex skin mite HOCL. So HOCL has no known impact on the adults. HOCL just kills the nymphs in the 5 to 6 days between hatching and becoming an adult. It kills the nymphs before they turn into adults and start breeding more demodex. The impact of HOCL on demodex is to more slowly cut back on the demodex breeding population. As adults die at the end of their 14-21 day life cycle, very few demodex have survived to replace them. The impact of this approach could take several life cycles to notice that it has helped...
                    Asking in the politest way possible... do you have any evidence to support these statements? Or are you speaking from personal experience?

                    As I mentioned, I haven't come across any clinical papers that establish HOCI's effectiveness at killing Demodex (nymph or adult). In fact, the papers I have read seem to suggest the opposite.

                    I use HOCI on my eyes but if I saw some evidence that it was broadly effective at killing Demodex I would probably start using it on the rest of my face, so I would love to read any and all information on this point that you might have come across!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Dutch1 View Post
                      Asking in the politest way possible... do you have any evidence to support these statements? Or are you speaking from personal experience?

                      As I mentioned, I haven't come across any clinical papers that establish HOCI's effectiveness at killing Demodex (nymph or adult). In fact, the papers I have read seem to suggest the opposite.

                      I use HOCI on my eyes but if I saw some evidence that it was broadly effective at killing Demodex I would probably start using it on the rest of my face, so I would love to read any and all information on this point that you might have come across!
                      I too prefer to find research papers or medical studies that prove a product actually works.

                      The overpriced Avenova HOCL spray is a product of NovaBay Pharmaceuticals. NovaBay does publicly make the claim that Avenova (0.01% HOCL) kills demodex in the nymph form. They claim that lab studies have shown this. Apparently, NovaBay has not published the research. The US Food and Drug Administration approved Aveeno as a prescription medication. The FDA does require proof that a product works before it can be approved for sale to the public. Avenova got approved. NoveBay claimed Avenova was pure and prescription grade and so worth the outrageous price. Avenova was so overpriced that insurance companies refused to pay for it ($600 USD per one ounce bottle considered a 1 month supply, instructions were to dispose of after one month and buy more). The generic equivalent can be purchased without a prescription for as little as $3 USD per ounce. It is chemically easy to make high grade, pure, HOCL with an electrolysis process.

                      All the research that I have seen comparing HOCL to Tea Tree Oil for killing demodex is testing both products on adult demodex. Most studies use Tea Tree oil in a hazardous 100% concentration. Tea Tree oil that strong will kill adult demodex in about 4 minutes. It is recommended that humans use tea tree oil cut to a maximum of a 50% concentration. Most products containing Tea Tree oil have no more than a 5% to 10% concentration. They may be comparing apples and oranges as far as what the 2 products are capable of.

                      I do use HOCL and have for over 3 years now. I had severe ocular rosacea and rosacea subtype 2 with papules and pustules that had been misdiagnosed for decades as bacterial acne by 4 board certified dermatologists. By 3-4 years ago, it finally got so bad that it turned into a roaring case of ocular rosacea. Based on the symptoms I believe that I did have both types of demodex: follicularum and brevis. Demodex brevis live down in the oil glands and are much harder to treat with topicals. After using 50% Tea Tree oil masks on my face twice daily and using Cliradex wipes twice daily for months the surface skin seemed better but I could not stop using the Cliradex wipes without the Demodex coming back in my eyes within a few days. I was also using HOCL spray at night and noticed after about 2 weeks that my eyes did seem less irritated. Hard to say what helped most. I ended up taking the 2 week combined 2 drug treatment with Oral Ivermectin weekly + Oral Metronidazole 3 times daily. It worked.

                      For maintenance, I wash my face nightly with a face wash containing tea tree oil and follow that with HOCL spray on the face. I have had no known recurrence of demodex. The HOCL is non-irritating and actually soothing if it gets in the eyes. Tea Tree oil can be very effective but it can also be extremely irritating. You can not use strong Tea Tree oil too close to the eyes. Some eye doctors do use strong Tea Tree oil to scrub the eye lids and lure the demodex out of the pores. They do this lid scrubbing procedure after numbing the eye area with a topical anesthetic. Patients screaming in pain are not good for business.-) The Cliradex wipes use a tea tree oil extract but I believe that it is no stronger than 10%. Tea Tree Oil and HOCL both work. But as I said they apparently don't work on demodex the same way. And yes HOCL treatment will take longer than 100% tea tree oil. If demodex brevis are part of the problem, the 2 week oral treatment may work best.
                      Last edited by ElaineA; 8 January 2021, 03:26 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks for the research!

                        I have bought hypochlorous acid from amazon, under the brand name Natrasan and was iffy about trying it. I think I might give a go. The instructions are that it is suitable for eyes and the face.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Hypochlorous spray update

                          just sprayed my face today after a run to the chemist. Unfortunately this time my face went pink immediately and still a little pink on my cheeks and chin an hour after.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X