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  • Fish oil promote vasodilation?

    Hey guys,

    I have been having a really tough time with rosacea recently and have been trying to figure out anything that could be making it worse. After some researching it looks like Fish oil may be a vasodilator? I feel like everyone tells me to take this for ocular rosacea and depression. Did anyone else know this? I'm really losing my faith that anything will help me.

  • #2
    Originally posted by 24andred View Post
    Hey guys,

    I have been having a really tough time with rosacea recently and have been trying to figure out anything that could be making it worse. After some researching it looks like Fish oil may be a vasodilator? I feel like everyone tells me to take this for ocular rosacea and depression. Did anyone else know this? I'm really losing my faith that anything will help me.

    Would flaxseed be better?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Countrygirl View Post
      Would flaxseed be better?

      From what I've read it looks like the vasodialator is the Omega 3's. These are present in flaxseed as well I believe.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by 24andred View Post
        From what I've read it looks like the vasodialator is the Omega 3's. These are present in flaxseed as well I believe.
        There is a difference between vasoactive foods (which cause an acute vasodilation) and foods that keep your arteries "relaxed" and dilated. Flushing would come from a vasoactive food when dilation happens quickly (like spicy foods, chocolate, caffeine). When a person eats healthy foods (like leafy greens, blueberries, flaxseeds, etc.) that promote sustained vasodilation (relaxed arteries overall), there is an overall benefit to the health of your cardiovascular system (lower blood pressure, decrease cholesterol buildup, etc). These foods do not cause a rapid vasodilation (hence flushing), but instead, an overall relaxed nature of your cardiovascular system. These foods can also benefit your health because they are anti-inflammatory as well.
        Last edited by MissM; 18 August 2017, 02:09 AM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by MissM View Post
          There is a difference between vasoactive foods (which cause an acute vasodilation) and foods that keep your arteries "relaxed" and dilated. Flushing would come from a vasoactive food when dilation happens quickly (like spicy foods, chocolate, caffeine). When a person eats healthy foods (like leafy greens, blueberries, flaxseeds, etc.) that promote sustained vasodilation (relaxed arteries overall), there is an overall benefit to the health of your cardiovascular system (lower blood pressure, decrease cholesterol buildup, etc). These foods do not cause a rapid vasodilation (hence flushing), but instead, an overall relaxed nature of your cardiovascular system. These foods can also benefit your health because they are anti-inflammatory as well.
          Thanks MissM,

          So although it isn't vasoactive and a quick flushing response, wouldn't sustained vasodilation create and issue for people that are consistently red and sensitive? I could be way off here. I'm just trying to make sure every supplement I take is definitely not contributing to the issue.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by 24andred View Post
            Thanks MissM,

            So although it isn't vasoactive and a quick flushing response, wouldn't sustained vasodilation create and issue for people that are consistently red and sensitive? I could be way off here. I'm just trying to make sure every supplement I take is definitely not contributing to the issue.
            I hear you! It's so frustrating to know what is causing redness/flushing/sensitivity. I have been to the point where I have been scared to put anything in my mouth when my flushing was so horrible last year. I ended up losing ten pounds!

            Redness (erythema) can be caused by so many factors...it could be a food allergy, inflammation, histamine response, demodex. What I do know (based on my nutrition science background) is that arteries that are in a relaxed state is a good thing and likely not the cause of constant redness, it seems like the other factors I mentioned would be at play...inflammation that is caused by another factor. It would be a shame for someone to not consume all those anti-inflammatory foods and healthy fats with a disease that has inflammation as it's backbone. Those are just my thoughts and I hope they help in some way!

            Comment


            • #7
              Fish oil for depression

              Originally posted by 24andred View Post
              Hey guys,

              I have been having a really tough time with rosacea recently and have been trying to figure out anything that could be making it worse. After some researching it looks like Fish oil may be a vasodilator? I feel like everyone tells me to take this for ocular rosacea and depression. Did anyone else know this? I'm really losing my faith that anything will help me.
              Sorry to hear that you are having such a bad time. I have been taking fish oil and eating fish regularly for years to combat depression. It works wonderfully for me and helps my rosacea. I take the liquid fish oil once daily. Depression can exacerbate rosacea and if I stop the fish and oils my rosacea is worse. Hope I've helped. The fish oil worked better for me than antidepressants.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by 24andred View Post
                Hey guys,

                I have been having a really tough time with rosacea recently and have been trying to figure out anything that could be making it worse. After some researching it looks like Fish oil may be a vasodilator? I feel like everyone tells me to take this for ocular rosacea and depression. Did anyone else know this? I'm really losing my faith that anything will help me.
                Fish oil certainly causes vasodilation and can, in some people produce oxidative stress. All PUFAS can.
                My face quickly turns into a flaming inferno if I touch the stuff.

                Have you tried oral niacinamide, and perhaps even taurine?
                Previous Numerous IPL.
                Supplements: High dose Niacinamide, Vit K2, low dose Vit A. Moderate Dose Vit C, Iodine, Taurine, Magnesium. Mod- dose B's. Low dose zinc. Testing Quercetin.

                Skin Care: No Cleanser, ZZ cream mixed with Niacinamide gel 4% and LMW HA 2%, ethyl ascorbate 2%.

                Treating for gut dysbiosis.(This is helping).
                Previous GAPS diet. Have now introduced lots of fibre.
                Fermented Foods. Intermittent fasting -16-18 hours.
                Oral Colostrum. Helps reduce food reactions.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Some people believe fish oil is a trigger to their rosacea (it causes me flushing if I take it), whereas other people find fish oil helpful to rosacea. It can cause a histamine response in some people. An anti-histamine seems to work really well for a minority of people with rosacea (and if histamine issues are one of your triggers for rosacea, you'd definitely want to keep away from fish oil). I noticed a clear and consistent flushing response if I took fish oil, which would go away within a day or so of stopping taking the fish oil.
                  Last edited by antwantsclear; 25 August 2017, 12:29 AM.

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                  • #10
                    I've taken up to nine fish oil caps per day for over a month straight and didn't notice any response, good or bad. A few months back I was taking a tablespoon of flaxseed oil a day for a couple of weeks and I started getting bumps where as I usually only suffer from erythema and flushing so for some reason my body reacted badly to the plant derived omega 3.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by MissM View Post
                      I hear you! It's so frustrating to know what is causing redness/flushing/sensitivity. I have been to the point where I have been scared to put anything in my mouth when my flushing was so horrible last year. I ended up losing ten pounds!

                      Redness (erythema) can be caused by so many factors...it could be a food allergy, inflammation, histamine response, demodex. What I do know (based on my nutrition science background) is that arteries that are in a relaxed state is a good thing and likely not the cause of constant redness, it seems like the other factors I mentioned would be at play...inflammation that is caused by another factor. It would be a shame for someone to not consume all those anti-inflammatory foods and healthy fats with a disease that has inflammation as it's backbone. Those are just my thoughts and I hope they help in some way!
                      I found this helpful food-for-thought MissM!

                      In response to what other ppl are saying ... I definitely read that fish oil is low-histamine (whereas canned fish/smoked fish/not fresh fish are high histamine), but I'm not sure if that's totally true since I know many ppl have an immediate rxn. I know when I took fermented cod liver oil I flushed big time (but assume the fermented meant high histamine). I am ok taking "normal" fish oil but don't currently take it.

                      I too got HUGE pimples/knolls when I took liquid flaxseed oil (no lignans) for a few weeks, at 1-2 tablespoons / day which was probably too much for my body. However my lips, which are usually peeling/dry, got all nice and plump. When I tried to take flaxseed oil pills with lignans, I *think* it made me more flushy (not immediately though) which I'm guessing was due to the lignans ... I'm very very sensitive to hormone (estrogen) changes though I've found so that might just be me.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by laser_cat View Post
                        I found this helpful food-for-thought MissM!

                        In response to what other ppl are saying ... I definitely read that fish oil is low-histamine (whereas canned fish/smoked fish/not fresh fish are high histamine), but I'm not sure if that's totally true since I know many ppl have an immediate rxn. I know when I took fermented cod liver oil I flushed big time (but assume the fermented meant high histamine). I am ok taking "normal" fish oil but don't currently take it.

                        I too got HUGE pimples/knolls when I took liquid flaxseed oil (no lignans) for a few weeks, at 1-2 tablespoons / day which was probably too much for my body. However my lips, which are usually peeling/dry, got all nice and plump. When I tried to take flaxseed oil pills with lignans, I *think* it made me more flushy (not immediately though) which I'm guessing was due to the lignans ... I'm very very sensitive to hormone (estrogen) changes though I've found so that might just be me.
                        Hey Lizzy!

                        Yes, it's so interesting how different foods affect different people! For instance, many people benefit from a low carb diet with rosacea, but for me....it makes it SO much worse (more redness, more pimples, more flushing). I eat a plant-based diet solely, including carb foods like whole grains and fruits and healthy fats, and the overall redness of my face went WAY down to the point where it is only red if I'm flushing. There are so many factors at play...histamine tolerance, hormones, microbiome status, food allergies, etc. That's crazy about the flaxseed oil! I'm glad you figured that out....breaking out in pimples on top of the other symptoms is a real bummer!

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                        • #13
                          Hi Mistica and MissM,

                          I have a side question, not sure if any of you can explain this perhaps, but do you know whether or not caffeine is a vasodilator or a vasoconstrictor for rosacea skin? I have read so much about it and read only conflicting info, even to the point of conflicting research articles. How come some people get massive flares from caffeine and others do fine on it and even state it constricts blood vessels (I think it's even used in skin creams).?

                          Thanks
                          My rosacea related blog: http://scarletnat.blogspot.com/2012/...edication.html

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by nat007 View Post
                            Hi Mistica and MissM,

                            I have a side question, not sure if any of you can explain this perhaps, but do you know whether or not caffeine is a vasodilator or a vasoconstrictor for rosacea skin? I have read so much about it and read only conflicting info, even to the point of conflicting research articles. How come some people get massive flares from caffeine and others do fine on it and even state it constricts blood vessels (I think it's even used in skin creams).?

                            Thanks
                            Hi nat007!

                            From what I understand, caffeine is a vasoconstrictor. In fact, I used to suffer from migraines as a teenager, which in essence, was my cranial blood vessels undergoing major dilation. Caffeine would often help to relieve the pain by it's vasoconstrictive mechanism. I am unsure is this vasoactive quality would help or hinder blood vessel dilation in the face (perhaps a rebound effect after the vasoconstriction?). Maybe a topical application of caffeine would be beneficial, but I'm not familiar enough with the topic to say.

                            For me, caffeine is a big trigger...but I attribute it's ability to increase hormones such as adrenaline and cortisol which can increase blood flow. When I am stressed (and presumably making more adrenaline/cortisol), my face is more prone to flush as well.

                            Those are my thoughts!
                            Hope you have a nice weekend, Nat!
                            -M.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by MissM View Post
                              Hi nat007!

                              From what I understand, caffeine is a vasoconstrictor. In fact, I used to suffer from migraines as a teenager, which in essence, was my cranial blood vessels undergoing major dilation. Caffeine would often help to relieve the pain by it's vasoconstrictive mechanism. I am unsure is this vasoactive quality would help or hinder blood vessel dilation in the face (perhaps a rebound effect after the vasoconstriction?). Maybe a topical application of caffeine would be beneficial, but I'm not familiar enough with the topic to say.

                              For me, caffeine is a big trigger...but I attribute it's ability to increase hormones such as adrenaline and cortisol which can increase blood flow. When I am stressed (and presumably making more adrenaline/cortisol), my face is more prone to flush as well.

                              Those are my thoughts!
                              Hope you have a nice weekend, Nat!
                              -M.
                              Thanks! I also read that caffeine can help with migraines, due to the vasoconstriction. Maybe I am too reactive anyway, but even iced coffee (with caffeine) gives me a monster flush. To the point that when I need to be flushed (back in the days for IPL for instance) I would drink coffee. Guaranteed flare.

                              Could it be that caffeine is good at constricting bigger arteries, but somehow having the ability to dilate smaller blood vessels in the epidermis?
                              I found this info:
                              "The effect of caffeine on our blood vessels is complex. In the brain, caffeine binds with adenosine receptors. Adenosine is a chemical that when bonded with nerve cells, among other things, causes the blood vessels to constrict. This is why many migraine drugs contain caffeine. The constriction of brain blood vessels eases the pain. On the other side caffeine also has a direct effect on the blood vessels in our body, especially on those in kidneys and lungs. The direct action causes the blood vessels to dilate. Because of these antagonistic effects the total result of caffeine effect on blood vessels is unpredictable."

                              And maybe coffee flares us sometimes too, because it stimulates the central nervous system?

                              Thanks for your answer
                              My rosacea related blog: http://scarletnat.blogspot.com/2012/...edication.html

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