Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Looking for a way to compound my own lotion/creme!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Looking for a way to compound my own lotion/creme!

    About a year ago I developed red splotches on my skin with accompanying flakes. Some were big and others were what I would describe as "little sheets." They varied in shade from translucent to a yellowish tinge. I went to the dermatologist and I was diagnosed with seborrheic dermatitis. I was told to use over-the-counter dandruff shampoo on my face. Oh my goodness, that was a disaster. My skin became so dry and angry; it itched worse than ever and the flakes became exaggerated. I went back to the dermatologist (same practice, different doctor) and he diagnosed me with eczema. I was given a steroid lotion and while I experienced some relief with that, I felt dependent on it. I don't want to be dependent on steroids.

    I finally made another appointment with a dermatologist known to my family and he diagnosed me with a combination of seborrheic dermatitis and eczema. I was put on a tacrolimus ointment. That worked great but only so long as I kept using it and, once again, I didn't want to be dependent on prescription medication. However, what did result from the tacrolimus ointment was the temporary cessation of thick biofilms.

    I started experimenting at that point. I noted the following characteristics about my skin:
    1. Definitely dehydrated and probably dry as well
    2. My skin does not like water from the tap or really water cleansing in general
    3. Most over-the-counter moisturizers upset my skin
    4. Skin is making excess sebum to combat the dehydration/dryness

    I stopped washing my face all together. I bought some micellar water on a whim after reading about its benefits. This was a turning point for me and is the single bulk of my regimen to-date. I experimented with three brands and settled on the one that worked for me [simple skincare micellar cleansing water]. I use this on my face with soft cotton pads in the morning. I do nothing at night. This is somehow working for me so far.

    However, I do have a pinkish-reddish cast to my skin that I can only assume is inflammation from dryness and dehydration. That brings me to the purpose of my post (thank you for sticking with me). I need to moisturize. Desperately. Everything I find over-the-counter is wrong. I read a lot of Tom Busby's posts and I'm trying to implement the suggestions made (medium chain fatty acids, low ph, lactic acid, etc). I want to try MCT oil on my face but I don't want to over-oil. Is it something I can make into a light lotion? Has anyone had MCT oil compounded with other non-prescription ingredients? Do you do this yourself or visit a compounding pharmacy?

    Thank you so much for your feedback and help!

  • #2
    Hi Telia, adding some MCT oil product would be a good plan, to keep skin strong and flexible. But 100% MCT oil is very shiny and oily, so as you indicated, that won't work.

    There's no simple way to make a true lotion, because a lotion is an oil in water emulsion with additional ingredients to make it thick, so it doesn't run through your fingers or run down your face onto your clothes.

    "Micelles" or the recently invented term, "micellar," are alternate names for the combination of oil molecules and water molecules in the presence of an emulsifier.

    You could make a very watery oil in water emulsion, a version of micellar water with MCT oil, using a formula something like this:
    97.7% distilled water
    1.5% MCT oil
    0.3% Cromollient SCE (emulsifier)
    0.5% Optiphen ND (preservative)

    Heat the MCT oil and the Cromollient in a small pyrex bowl in a pan of water on the stove. Also heat the distilled water in a pyrex bowl in a pan of water on the stove. Cover the pyrex bowls with saran wrap. Using a thermometer to measure the temp of the hot water, hold the temp at 170F for 20 minutes. Then pour the oil into the water, and stir occasionally until cooled to 100F, and add the preservative. Pour into a clean container.

    You'll need a digital scale and a 1ml plastic syringe -- the syringe is free at any pharmacy. The scale will cost about $30. You must use a commercial preservative because water supports many kinds of microbial life that will cause skin problems.

    The ratio of Cromollient SCE to oil is usually taken to be 1 to 5, but I've found 1 to 7 is ok too, if for example you want to increase the amount of MCT oil, but more than 0.3% Cromollient SCE is "a lot" so increasing this in order to add more MCT may not work very well because Cromollient SCE is slightly sticky in aesthetic terms.

    In my opinion, 15% MCT oil is the maximum concentration in a true lotion, for aesthetics, but with the simple emulsion formula above, the maximum MCT concentration in a very thin, watery cosmetic is probably about 3%, but that's just a good guess.

    This formula will not make a light lotion, because it will be very watery in consistency. This is intended to be a minimalistic solution, rather than an ideal solution, and I've suggested it solely because it's very easy to make.

    Compounding pharmacies don't make these sorts of things -- pharmacists mix ingredients into prepared bases that they buy, and the prepared bases are like any lotion you can buy off the shelf, and they are very poor products when malassezia's metabolic needs are considered.

    I've never made this formula, but I use Cromollient SCE to emulsify MCT oil in the shampoo/shower gel formulas I've published on this forum, so I'm certain you'll make a stable emulsion with it.

    You could test this product by seeing if it removes your make-up, and I doubt that it will -- if it doesn't, then you should add about 5% mild surfactant, such as coco-betaine. I suggest this because you can use water-only to wash with for only for a little while, because the make-up and environmental dirt that builds up over time is really bad for skin, and the addition of a mild surfactant would be a good idea. I think you should plan to have two cosmetic products -- something to wash with, and something to moisturize with.

    Lotioncrafters and many other places sell Cromollient SCE and Optiphen ND.

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi, Tom.

      Thank you for the breakdown and the instructions. I'm going to give this a try.

      I don't wear make-up anymore because it's an irritant. Mascara is about as fancy as I get these days. I don't see very much oil and dirt on the cotton rounds after I cleanse my face with the micellar water. I have to squint to detect anything at all. I've surmised that as long as I continue to cleanse my face daily it prevents the oil/sebum from accumulating and the malassezia from their favorite meal. No noticable biofilm. If I use water, any water from the tap, I experience what can only be described as a full blown histamine response--raised hives and itchy, red splotches coupled with irritation that persists for days. I gather that the water is raising my skin's ph making it more favorable for the yeast, in addition to the sensitivities that come with heavily chlorinated tap water. I researched simple skincare and the ph range of their products 5.5 to 7 with our best guesses that the higher values belong to cleansers [excluding the micellar cleansing water].

      I have the syringes available in bulk because I just so happen to use one ml syringes for my B12 injections. Is there a way to create a mixture with aloe vera? I'd love to add some B vitamins to the mixture. I might be trying to pack too many things into my formula. I think the compound I'm most interested in right now is xylitol. I'm reading so many good things about it. Have you incorporated xylitol into anything yet?

      Thank you so much for replying to me and brainstorming with me. This has been a bizarre thing to battle alone, particularly since all my "treatments" have come from exhaustive research and my dermatologist's willingness to explore whatever seemingly bizarre concoctions I suggest.

      Comment


      • #4
        OK, good, you're on the right track. Here are some suggestions. Xylitol is easily water soluble and can be added at 2%, which I prefer, or up to 5%. Niacinamide is also water soluble and should be added at 150F, at about 2%, with dl-panthenol at about 1.5% at 120F, and glycerin at about 3% at any temp.

        Aloe Vera is a very poor additive because it oxidizes (turns brown) in 2-3 weeks.

        The histamine response you describe is exactly the first response/problem, but this fades with effective treatment. As for tap water, I don't know -- that's never been a problem for me.

        Comment


        • #5
          What is MCT oil? Is that medium chain triglycerides?

          Why medium?

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi, Tom!

            Love all your suggestions and I've already purchased some of the items necessary to formulate my own lotion! It's exciting. I enlisted help in my project because otherwise I'll end up burning my house down.

            I have incredibly sensitive skin it seems. Have you looked at Vanicream? How do these ingredients fare with our seb-derm limitations?

            Vanicream Moisturizing Skin Cream and Vanicream Lite Lotion:
            purified water, white petrolatum, sorbitol solution, cetearyl alcohol, propylene glycol, ceteareth-20, simethicone, glyceryl monostearate, polyethylene glycol monostearate, sorbic acid, BHT

            Vaniply Ointment:
            C30-45 alkyl methicone, C30-45 olefin, hydrogenated polydecene, microcrystalline wax, polyethylene, silica dimethyl silylate

            How do these hold up? I use these products on my body because it's the only line my skin doesn't immediately rebel against. My face seems to be in a realm of sensitivity all its own. I'm curious if I can use these on my face, too, without too much worry. I've actually never tried. Thanks again, Tom.

            Comment


            • #7
              Many people with sensitive skin like VaniCream products, but I don't because they're very occlusive (which means they're sticky and wash off poorly) -- this results because VaniCream contains petrolatum (identical to Vaseline), but Vanicream emulsifies petrolatum with water. My guess is that Vanicream original is about 15% petrolatum and the rest is mostly water.

              Accordingly, VaniCream, or Aquaphor, are less occlusive than pure petrolatum, but still retain much of the sticky and poor wash-ability qualities of pure petrolatum. I prefer a lotion that soaks into skin, and is less shiny.

              Petrolatum is a very long chain carbon oil, or wax, that is C22 to about C30. Malassezia cannot metabolize this, probably because petrolatum doesn't occur in nature, but is a manmade product distilled from hydrocarbons. MCT oil also doesn't occur in nature, and is a manmade product distilled from coconut oil, but I prefer MCT oil because petroleum products, as a given, contain traces of god-only-knows-what, being distilled from crude oil that was created millions of years ago by underground geologic and other unknown processes.

              As a work-around to attempt to remove trace contaminants, petrolatum can be further processed into "micro-crystalline" wax, which is supposed to be purer. Who knows.

              Other examples of synthetic ingredients similar to petrolatum, but wholly manmade, are found in Vaniply, which has several similar ingredients, in the C30 and up range, including hydrogenated polydecene, which contains no oil molecules shorter than C30. These probably have a silky feel, like dimethicone.

              I haven't tried Vaniply, but I suspect it feels like a fine grade of motor oil, refined to be suitable for lubricating the surface of the skin, and a clearish white color. It probably won't soak in the skin at all.

              In my opinion, the problem with the VaniCream products is that they hold up too well, because they're sticky and very poorly water soluble. This would be great if I wanted to shield my hands from severe environmental dirt and oils, such as when I'm working on my car. But buy-it and try-it, to see how it works out for you. They're not what I'm looking for -- I like to take an ordinary shower and start out fresh, without needing to scrub off any waxy build-up.

              When making cosmetics, use a 10% bleach to disinfect all your working surfaces, buy fresh glassware, and don't use the new glassware for anything but making cosmetics. Glass is porous. Surprising but true.

              Please post what you learn by making your own cosmetics.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Tom Busby View Post
                Many people with sensitive skin like VaniCream products, but I don't because they're very occlusive (which means they're sticky and wash off poorly) -- this results because VaniCream contains petrolatum (identical to Vaseline), but Vanicream emulsifies petrolatum with water. My guess is that Vanicream original is about 15% petrolatum and the rest is mostly water.

                Accordingly, VaniCream, or Aquaphor, are less occlusive than pure petrolatum, but still retain much of the sticky and poor wash-ability qualities of pure petrolatum. I prefer a lotion that soaks into skin, and is less shiny.

                Petrolatum is a very long chain carbon oil, or wax, that is C22 to about C30. Malassezia cannot metabolize this, probably because petrolatum doesn't occur in nature, but is a manmade product distilled from hydrocarbons. MCT oil also doesn't occur in nature, and is a manmade product distilled from coconut oil, but I prefer MCT oil because petroleum products, as a given, contain traces of god-only-knows-what, being distilled from crude oil that was created millions of years ago by underground geologic and other unknown processes.

                As a work-around to attempt to remove trace contaminants, petrolatum can be further processed into "micro-crystalline" wax, which is supposed to be purer. Who knows.

                Other examples of synthetic ingredients similar to petrolatum, but wholly manmade, are found in Vaniply, which has several similar ingredients, in the C30 and up range, including hydrogenated polydecene, which contains no oil molecules shorter than C30. These probably have a silky feel, like dimethicone.

                I haven't tried Vaniply, but I suspect it feels like a fine grade of motor oil, refined to be suitable for lubricating the surface of the skin, and a clearish white color. It probably won't soak in the skin at all.

                In my opinion, the problem with the VaniCream products is that they hold up too well, because they're sticky and very poorly water soluble. This would be great if I wanted to shield my hands from severe environmental dirt and oils, such as when I'm working on my car. But buy-it and try-it, to see how it works out for you. They're not what I'm looking for -- I like to take an ordinary shower and start out fresh, without needing to scrub off any waxy build-up.

                When making cosmetics, use a 10% bleach to disinfect all your working surfaces, buy fresh glassware, and don't use the new glassware for anything but making cosmetics. Glass is porous. Surprising but true.

                Please post what you learn by making your own cosmetics.
                Hi, Tom!

                Thank you for the prompt reply. I have the cream and the lotion and use them both for different reasons. I find that the lotion sinks right into the skin, incredibly fast. In fact, after a few minutes it's as if you've got nothing on your skin at all. That's why I prefer the lite lotion for every day body moisturizing. I reserve the cream for tough problems like my dry hands. I wash my hands a lot and they are prone to excessive, rough dryness. Sometimes the lite lotion doesn't do the job to my satisfaction, so I use the cream as an intensive. I apply it after every hand washing and it softens, soothes and completely eradicates redness in a few days. I completely agree that the cream is too heavy and I don't like the feel of it on my palms. I tend to just rub the backs of my hands together with cream and later apply a tiny dot of lite lotion to my palms. I certainly don't want to leave grease hand prints everywhere--gross!

                If I try the Vanicream on my face, it will be the lite lotion. I bought some Aquaphor today, too. I know they're incredibly similar but I plan to try them both and see which I like better. I find the smallest variations in formula can make a difference for the individual. I'll give it a go and see where they stack up. At least, until my Franken-mixture-lotion is ready for a test run.

                The Vaniply is a white-ish/opaque, thick product very like the consistency of vaseline. I've used it only once and that was on a friction burn from my climbing harness. In that capacity, it was great. It protected and healed well.

                I am going to use the MCT oil in my lotion-making endeavors. I saw the brand you recommend from Whole Foods. I purchased a Clorox Healthcare bleach, germicidal cleaner a while back. That will come in handy. If you're looking for a non-toxic and EPA certified anti-microbial cleaner with proven fungicidal efficacy you should look into Sporicidin. It smells a whole lot like black licorice but for some people that's preferable to the strong stench of bleach. (It even kills C.Diff, spores and all.) I keep that and the bleach on hand. I don't mix them, but just them for different jobs.

                I'll update on my cosmetic making progress. I might have some other lingering questions and I appreciate all your help! Happy New Year!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Looking for a way to compound my own lotion/creme!

                  I just found this on eBay /YouTube ~ what do you think of his method of mixing climbazole ?

                  http://youtu.be/ADU1Y27H6P8

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X