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NSAID liquid capsules / Topical NSAID

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  • NSAID liquid capsules / Topical NSAID

    Hi everyone,

    I'm just wondering has anyone tried using a topical NSAID for there rosacea. I myself used voltaren gel **Diclofenac, Active ingredient** a couple of years back without success. I found it very harsh on my sensitive skin and inflamed my subtype 1 rosacea, the opposite of what I wanted or expected

    I was thinking that it was more then likely not the active ingredient that caused this reaction, but the other ingredients used in the topical.

    I noticed that popular NSAIDS are available in a liquid capsule form for oral use and was wondering has anyone ever extracted the liquid gel and applied it too there skin? I'm hoping this will avoid inflaming the rosacea as it is just the active ingredient without all the harsh stuff.

    I will link a photo below with a brand **not avaible in Ireland but I'm sure we have an alternative** of the capsules I'm thinking of trying out.
    Hopefully if anyone has already tried this for subtype 1 inflammation and burning they can drop a comment below with there experience.

    Thanks Guys
    [IMG][/IMG]

  • #2
    Hi Carl, There was a study out a while ago about topical ibuprofen gel for flushing/blushing. Here's a link to a thread about it. But there are more references to ibuprofen on the forum and also you'll find more via Google. http://www.rosaceagroup.org/The_Rosa...shing-problems

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    • #3
      The liquid inside capsules intended for oral use will be a highly concentrated solution/suspension of the active component. It should not be applied directly to the skin as a topical without considerable dilution.

      The NSAID compositions intended topical use contain only a small proportion (1 to 2%) of active drug.

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      • #4
        Thank you for that information hg and johnabetts, much appreciated.

        Ohh [emoji15] that never crossed my mind Johnabetts!. Hence why all the topicals list the active ingredient and normally 1% or lower afterwords. If I do give it a try I'll make sure to dilute the the liquid gel before applying it too my skin.[emoji106]
        carllambert1993
        Senior Member
        Last edited by carllambert1993; 16 November 2015, 12:57 PM.

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        • #5
          Just want to update this in case anyone gets any "bright idea's".

          I bought some liquid ibuprofen capsules today and have decided not too use them topically. I thought the capsules would just be the active ingredient without any other stuff. From reading the leaflet that came with them I was wrong.

          Lots of other stuff added that when I Googled I wasn't to impressed with, so I won't be doing my experiment after all.

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          • #6
            Rosaceans should avoid topical NSAIDs, too irritating for the skin.

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