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  • Seb Derm, etc resouces

    Treatment of Seborrheic Dermatitis


  • #2
    http://thebeautybrains.com/2008/08/1...d-itchy-scalp/

    edited to fix link thanks to man_ from_ mars
    Last edited by Melissa W; 2 May 2009, 01:23 AM.

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    • #3
      Why do I have Seb Derm

      Thought the Chart better belonged here: http://www.pgdermatology.com/images/...wson-Three.pdf
      "Get busy living or get busy dying."

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      • #4
        Going along with the theme of this thread
        and treating seb derm with different dandruff shampoos

        They can all possibly do something good on the scalp
        if you have some type of dandruff or seb derm.
        It's just a matter of finding which one helps the most
        and maybe cycling through them over a couple of months

        I was a big believer in Nizoral(ketoconazole) but think I became immune
        Lots of other people swear by H&S (pyrithione zinc)

        I would like to give big props to the Selsun Blue (Selenium Sulfide)
        Lately using just a drop as a face wash and leaving on for only about 30 seconds
        has helped me tremendously with the general background redness of the cheeks
        (sure it stinks pretty bad - but it's helping)

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        • #5
          not sure how long this link will work before it goes dead ...

          Medicated shampoos for the treatment of Seborrheic dermatitis

          http://findarticles.com/p/articles/m...27981917/print

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          • #6
            Just an abstract but may be useful
            http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1...?dopt=Abstract

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            • #7
              I usually have a supply of all the major types of Dandruff Shampoos
              and switch between them to help avoid getting immune to the effects.
              ie: Ketoconazol (Nizoral 1%), Pyrithione Zinc(H&S), Selenium sulfide (Selsun Blue)

              As far as Pyrithione Zinc
              I have switched from Head and Shoulders 1% to "Neutrogena Daily Control"
              It's pretty cheap too and probably found at your local Supermarket

              Neutrogena has made a "tar" based shampoo for years which is also good to try occasionally
              Note: don't use the tar stuff everyday though - reportedly it will cause blue hair
              (especially if you may be greying a little as you get older)

              The Neutrogena Daily Control which is 1% Pyrithione Zinc
              doesn't have the same drying effect on me that the H&S 1% or 2% has
              but of course everyone reacts differently - so no guarantees
              Last edited by man_from_mars; 27 June 2011, 09:16 PM.

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              • #8
                Wow, look at the dermnet.com website, which has many photos of various people with seb derm: http://hardinmd.lib.uiowa.edu/dermne...ermatitis.html

                Here’s the link to the main index, where all types of skin conditions are shown: http://www.dermnet.com/dermatology-p...ease-pictures/

                These links will be useful for people who are sensitive about posting their own photo, as someone could write, “my condition looks just like photo # 83, .….,” and will also help people figure out their own particular skin condition.

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                • #9
                  Here's a very good article about Microorganisms and Atopic Dermatitis: www.intechopen.com/download/pdf/29031

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                  • #10
                    Here’s an interesting article, “Scaly Scalp in Different Dermatological Diseases: A Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopical Study:” http://www.sciencepub.net/nature/ns0...0812_61_69.pdf

                    Where the article discusses keratinocytes and corneocytes, translate the words to “biofilms” so it makes more sense.

                    Previously I’d never seen any article explain that a scanning electron microscope could be used to accurately diagnose scaling skin conditions. Finally, there’s an actual skin-test that a physician could be comfortable with, as the test has a high-science appearance and is undoubtedly expensive.

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                    • #11
                      Here’s an interesting book written for researchers, but full of current information about cosmetics and the skin: Handbook of Cosmetic Science and Technology, Third Edition, found at http://aucops.wordpress.com/

                      Niacinamide is favorably mentioned at page 34.

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                      • #12
                        http://www.pgscience.com/files/pdf/D...2_Dandruff.pdf

                        Very detailed overview on Dandruff and SD. Some parts are too "medical", but helps new and intermediate SD patients to better understand the condition (and treatments).

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                        • #13
                          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4448221/

                          This is a pretty thorough overview of various studies comparing anti-fungal treatments for seborrheic dermatitis.

                          Interesting to note that they include a study which compared ketoconazole to climbazole, the latter often being touted on this forum, but the results were far more favourable for ketoconazole. Granted, it was a single short-term study, but worth mentioning.

                          Ketoconazole versus climbazole
                          Primary outcomes
                          Participants without complete resolution
                          Lopez-Padilla 1996 compared the effects of ketoconazole and climbazole over the long term (more than four weeks). Only 20% (6/30) of participants taking ketoconazole only failed to achieve complete resolution of rashes compared with 86% (26/30) of those taking climbazole, which reflected a statistically significant difference (RR 0.23, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.48 (Analysis 6.1); NNTB 2, 95% CI 2 to 3).
                          Whereas the results for ketoconazole versus ciclopirox olamine were more or less comparable:

                          Ketoconazole versus ciclopirox
                          Primary outcomes
                          Participants without complete resolution
                          Three studies (Chosidow 2003; Diehl 2013; Unholzer 2002(I)) compared effectiveness of ketoconazole versus that of ciclopirox. Among participants taking ciclopirox, 58% (133/228) did not have resolution of their seborrhoeic dermatitis compared with 63% (139/219) taking ketoconazole, but the difference was not statistically significant (RR 1.09, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.26; I² = 32%) (Analysis 4.1).

                          Chosidow 2003 and Diehl 2013 assessed comparative effectiveness of these treatments on long-term (more than four weeks) application and found that ciclopirox was better, with fewer participants exhibiting persistence of their seborrhoeic dermatitis again compared with ketoconazole, but the difference was not statistically significant (RR 1.10, 95% CI 0.88 to 1.36; I² = 51%) (Analysis 4.2).

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by sejon View Post
                            https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4448221/

                            This is a pretty thorough overview of various studies comparing anti-fungal treatments for seborrheic dermatitis.

                            Interesting to note that they include a study which compared ketoconazole to climbazole, the latter often being touted on this forum, but the results were far more favourable for ketoconazole. Granted, it was a single short-term study, but worth mentioning.
                            Interesting. I've always wondered why ketoconazole doesn't get much fanfare on this website - I've read nothing but great things about it in published studies. I wonder if anyone on here has tried ExTina - the prescription ketoconzaole product designed for facial skin. It's a cosmetically elegant light-weight foam specifically designed for facial skin. It seems pretty interesting.

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                            • #15
                              That's incredible. All the hype about Climbazole on this forum and that study pretty much states that it's useless for Seb Derm. Almost everyday this forum has posts from people looking for ways to buy Climbazole and how to mix the stuff properly. What a waste of money, time and effort.

                              86% failed to see complete resolution in the Climbazole group compared to just 20% in the Ketoconazole group !!
                              That's a massive difference. It now makes sense to me why products containing Climbazole aren't readily available in every country. The stuff doesn't work, that's why.

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