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  • New SIBO test adds a 3rd gas Hydrogen Sulfide to the test

    New medical test available for Hydrogen Sulfide SIBO.

    Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) has been shown to occur with Rosacea Subtype 2 for at least a 50-60% of cases. However, the current SIBO breath test only tests for Hydrogen and Methane gases. Cedars-Sinai has a new test as of 29 Sep 2020 that can test for Hydrogen Sulfide gas as well.

    SIDE NOTE: Rosacea Subtype 1 patients (predominantly with flushing) tend to have higher incidence of H. Pylori bacterial infections. The H. Pylori bacteria has been previously associated with some types of stomach ulcers.

    It will be interesting to see if adding the test for the 3rd gas increases the percent of Rosacea Subtype 2 patients diagnosed with SIBO. If so, Hydrogen Sulfide producing bacteria may account for some or all of the remaining 40-50% of Rosacea Subtype 2 patients who tested negative for Hydrogen or Methane on the older 2 gas SIBO test.

    Bacteriodes is a bacteria known to cause SIBO. Bacterioides produce hydrogen sulfide gas. 4 antibiotics including inexpensive, generic Oral Metronidazole (Flagyll) are highly effective at clearing Bacterioides.

    Studies on people with positive SIBO tests for Hydrogen or Methane producing bacteria have shown that the very expensive antibiotic Rifaximin works well for most patients. Rifaximin is best for people with Hydrogen dominant SIBO. Rifaximin works very well for E. Coli, Shigella and Salmonella bacteria. However, Rifaximin may not be the most effective antibiotic for other types of SIBO causing bacteria.

    Adding the test for Hydrogen Sulfide to the SIBO testing arsenal may give doctors more information to select the most appropriate antibiotic for treating SIBO. Getting the correct antibiotic to fight a bacteria makes all the difference in treatment success.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    News Link about the test for Hydrogen Sulfide SIBO at Cedars-Sinai:
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

    https://www.healio.com/news/gastroen...me-in-patients

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    One test for Hydrogen Sulfide is being marketed at the URL below. (I have no knowledge of whether this test is accurate or not. Just putting it out there in case some one might like to research it further.)
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

    https://www.triosmartbreath.com/


    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Medical Studies showing elimination of SIBO clears rosacea:
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18456568/

    https://www.cghjournal.org/article/S...155-9/fulltext

    https://www.news-medical.net/health/...010%20patients.

    https://www.verywellhealth.com/the-l...s-sibo-4000518

    https://link.springer.com/article/10...55-020-00460-1

  • #2
    Originally posted by ElaineA View Post
    New medical test available for Hydrogen Sulfide SIBO.

    Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) has been shown to occur with Rosacea Subtype 2 for at least a 50-60% of cases. However, the current SIBO breath test only tests for Hydrogen and Methane gases. Cedars-Sinai has a new test as of 29 Sep 2020 that can test for Hydrogen Sulfide gas as well.

    SIDE NOTE: Rosacea Subtype 1 patients (predominantly with flushing) tend to have higher incidence of H. Pylori bacterial infections. The H. Pylori bacteria has been previously associated with some types of stomach ulcers.

    It will be interesting to see if adding the test for the 3rd gas increases the percent of Rosacea Subtype 2 patients diagnosed with SIBO. If so, Hydrogen Sulfide producing bacteria may account for some or all of the remaining 40-50% of Rosacea Subtype 2 patients who tested negative for Hydrogen or Methane on the older 2 gas SIBO test.

    Bacteriodes is a bacteria known to cause SIBO. Bacterioides produce hydrogen sulfide gas. 4 antibiotics including inexpensive, generic Oral Metronidazole (Flagyll) are highly effective at clearing Bacterioides.

    Studies on people with positive SIBO tests for Hydrogen or Methane producing bacteria have shown that the very expensive antibiotic Rifaximin works well for most patients. Rifaximin is best for people with Hydrogen dominant SIBO. Rifaximin works very well for E. Coli, Shigella and Salmonella bacteria. However, Rifaximin may not be the most effective antibiotic for other types of SIBO causing bacteria.

    Adding the test for Hydrogen Sulfide to the SIBO testing arsenal may give doctors more information to select the most appropriate antibiotic for treating SIBO. Getting the correct antibiotic to fight a bacteria makes all the difference in treatment success.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    News Link about the test for Hydrogen Sulfide SIBO at Cedars-Sinai:
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

    https://www.healio.com/news/gastroen...me-in-patients

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    One test for Hydrogen Sulfide is being marketed at the URL below. (I have no knowledge of whether this test is accurate or not. Just putting it out there in case some one might like to research it further.)
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

    https://www.triosmartbreath.com/


    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Medical Studies showing elimination of SIBO clears rosacea:
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18456568/

    https://www.cghjournal.org/article/S...155-9/fulltext

    https://www.news-medical.net/health/...010%20patients.

    https://www.verywellhealth.com/the-l...s-sibo-4000518

    https://link.springer.com/article/10...55-020-00460-1
    4 antibiotics including inexpensive, generic Oral Metronidazole (Flagyll) are highly effective at clearing Bacterioides.

    which ones are the other 3 antibiotics please ?

    also , rifaxamin isnt that expensive , it only costs about 50 gbp for a 2 week course if you know where to get it !

    thanks

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by boris View Post
      4 antibiotics including inexpensive, generic Oral Metronidazole (Flagyll) are highly effective at clearing Bacterioides.

      which ones are the other 3 antibiotics please ?

      also , rifaxamin isnt that expensive , it only costs about 50 gbp for a 2 week course if you know where to get it !

      thanks
      Bacteroides is an anerobic bacteria. Metronidazole is the drug of choice for anerobic bacteria.

      The most frequently prescribed antibiotics for Bacteroides include:
      β-lactams
      Piperacillin/tazobactam
      carbapenems such as meropenem
      metronidazole


      https://www.hopkinsguides.com/hopkin...roides_species

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK553032/

      Interesting that you have identified a much less expensive source for Rifaximin. In the overpriced US prescription drug market, currently GoodRx shows the retail uninsured price for 42 tablets (550 mg) ranging from $2200-$2400 USA discounted to $1900-$2000 USD. With insurance the copay ranges about $60-$80. Regrettably, US law does not currently permit citizens to import drugs.

      Comment


      • #4
        I just did a thorough stool exam called Enteroscan. There are several bacteria above the normal range: Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli enteropathogenic, Streptococcus sp, Bacteroides sp, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Candida sp. There is also high histamine. The test talks about severe dysbiosis. I am not quite sure how to treat this. I assume that I should take metronidazole for the two anaerobes, but what to take for strep and escherichia? I tried amoxicillin several months ago and it made me even sicker than I already am.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by MariaSt View Post
          I just did a thorough stool exam called Enteroscan. There are several bacteria above the normal range: Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli enteropathogenic, Streptococcus sp, Bacteroides sp, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Candida sp. There is also high histamine. The test talks about severe dysbiosis. I am not quite sure how to treat this. I assume that I should take metronidazole for the two anaerobes, but what to take for strep and escherichia? I tried amoxicillin several months ago and it made me even sicker than I already am.
          Are you allergic to Penicillin? Amoxicillin is a penicillin type antibiotic. Good against Strep and frequently used to treat Strep throat infections. Not a good choice if you are allergic to penicillin though.
          Drugs to avoid if you are allergic to penicillin: It is generally recommended that you avoid all drugs in the immediate penicillin family (amoxicillin, ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, dicloxacillin, nafcillin, piperacillin-tazobactam as well as certain drugs in the cephalosporin class (a closely related class to penicillins).

          Other non-penicillin based antibiotic options for Strep bacteria include:
          - Azithromycin (Zithromax, Zmax, Z-Pak)
          - Clarithromycin (Biaxin)
          - Clindamycin (Cleocin)

          Best non-penicillin based medications for E.coli
          - Levaquin (levofloxacin)
          - Azithromycin (Zithromax, Zmax, Z-Pak)
          - Xifaxan (rifaximin) - Rifaximin is very expensive and considered a broad spectrum antibiotic commonly used to treat some types of SIBO. Rifaximin is the drug of choice against the strains of E Coli that cause non-bloody travelers diarrhea, and also shigella and salmonella bacteria. Another study (URL below to medical study published by NIH) indicates that Rifaximin is also good against Strep. Rifaximin is not effective against the strain of E Coli that causes bloody diarrhea or fever.

          https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/7774516/

          Assuming that you are not allergic to Azithromycin, it looks like the Azithromycin (aka Z-Pak) could work for both types of bacteria. Its not penicillin based. Rifaximin is another good option.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thank you for your suggestions. I am not allergic to anything, it?s just that I am nauseous and have stomach pain all the time. I discovered that I have idiopathic chronic pancreatitis the for the last two years. Any medication I take makes me even more sick. Zithromax won?t treat Escherichia. Maybe Ciprofloxacin can treat both Escherichia and Strep?

            Comment

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