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  • Why does no one know about hypochlorous acid?

    Hypochlorous acid is remarkable. I've been using it with great success lately.

    It's naturally produced in white blood cells, is incredibly gentle, able to disrupt biofilms and has a kill rate of 99.99% against bacteria and fungus in just a couple of minutes. Somehow very few people have heard of hypochlorous acid, and those that have may have only heard about it in eyewashes. It's very effective against demodex, so it also offers another way if treating demodex conditions without resorting to harsh sulphur based solutions.

    Seb derm and other skin problems have a lot to do with a compromised skin barrier. I've always found it very hard to treat my skin effectively because topicals are very rarely gentle on the skin. Hypochlorous acid is so gentle that it's used on newborn babies, yet has all the benefits listed above. Use it in your mouth, in your eyes, anywhere.

    I've been using hypochlorous acid by itself and in combination with the antifungal, lotrimin ultra. The combination has been more effective, but hypochlorous acid by itself has also given me excellent results. I've used it on both my face and upper body. I've only used hypochlorous acid on my body and my skin has dramatically improved. The same thing happened with my face, but the addition of an antifungal took things up a notch. My theory is that this is because hypochlorous acid is effective in disrupting biofilms so allows an antifungal to really get to work.

    The first step is to avoid using any products that feed malassezia. The second step is to apply hypochlorous acid. The third step is to apply an antifungal cream.

    An important observation is that you need to buy a pure version. I use Natrasan, if you're in the USA you have a few options. It's also more effective when you use a cotton pad to rub it into your skin. I usually spray the affected areas a couple of times, then spray a cotton pad a few times and wipe my skin with it, and finish off by spraying again.

  • #2
    Thanks. Never heard of it. I have added some items in our non profit affiliate store.
    Brady Barrows
    Blog - Join the RRDi


    Comment


    • #3
      Pauly, which product with hypochlorous acid do you use?

      Comment


      • #4
        People here do know about this material. A search (search box top right) gives nineteen results - some of which I have contributed to.

        Perhaps the poor stability and the IP position plays a part in its lack of popularity.

        The sodium salt of hypochlorous acid, sodium hypochlorite, is more stable and widely used as bleach (Clorox).

        Comment


        • #5
          Not so outlandish that hypochlorous acid helps, as I recall coming across an article discussing a treatment gel indicated for seb derm that uses it as its active ingredient. I've found the article in question here.

          The risk of irritation is practically zilch considering it can even be used around the eyes to treat blepharitis. This makes it a welcome alternative to the antimicrobial organic acids (like acetic, formic, and propionic acids) since they can be much more irritating and probably much less effective.

          Comment


          • #6
            Not long ago I went to the eye hospital for a laser surgery, and while doing a preliminary checkup they diagnosed me with mild blepharitis.

            So, sure enough, I recalled the novel stable form of hypochlorous acid spray as a treatment -- thanks to this thread mentioning it -- and purchased the same Natrasan spray as the OP mentioned. It smells very mildly of chlorine but is gentle enough to be used even on the eye itself (although you might need to half-close the eyes simply due to the force of spray).

            Interestingly, there's mention of it being able to kill the nymph form of demodex, so I'm curious if it's a viable alternative to other mite killers like tea tree oil and sulfur. They don't mention it being able to kill the adults, so I assume it doesn't, but in the longer term that would be inconsequential -- it just means the time to recovery would be longer, but that's a small price to pay for its gentleness and convenience.

            Comment


            • #7
              Very interesting. I can’t seem to find many studies for hypochlorous acid applied topically to human skin. Although searched it on amazon and found a spray safe for babies (Vital sanitising water spray)

              Are there any negative side effects? I wonder how likely resistance would be too

              Comment


              • #8
                Probably the lack of studies is due to the fact that it had only recently been stabilised successfully for commercial use. That said, the few that exist are quite promising.

                As far as its irritation potential, there isn’t any. I’ve been spraying it around and in my eyes twice a day (after washing) and have experienced no side effects, except for some mild dry patches underneath my eyes that resolved quickly (but this might well be a Demodex die-off). If it’s safe enough to spray in your eyeball, then it’s surely safe enough for your skin. I couldn’t say I’d put any other skincare products I use on my eyes, so hypochlorous acid is by far the gentlest I’ve come across.

                It’s an extremely effective antibacterial and I don’t see any reports of resistance.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Could hypochlorous acid be used to kill malassezia? I’ve read that it’s antifungal against Candida and other fungi, but can’t find anything for malassezia

                  It seems safe enough to try though, I’m going to spray it on my scalp before shampooing

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Why does no one know about hypochlorous acid?

                    I came across a long review on a hypochlorous acid product sold on Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/Hypochlorous-.../dp/B06VW5J11K) and I copy-paste it here, as it’s worth reading:
                    “In the last week, I have done a brief survey of the hypochlorous acid products that are available in the marketplace.
                    It's certainly not an exhaustive list, and I have not personally tried most of them, but I will summarize below the information that I've compiled, in the hopes that it will help other people, for whatever reason they are interested in hypochlorous acid -- whether for eye ailments (like dry eye, meibomian gland problems, demodex infection), skin ailments (like rosacea, acne, eczema), wound care, pet care, household cleaning, etc.

                    Varied branding, marketing, packaging

                    The market landscape for hypochlorous acid products that are meant to be used by the general public (on their bodies, their pets' bodies, or for surface cleaning) is complicated. Not only are there different prescription and over-the-counter brands, concentrations, formulations, manufacturing methods, and packaging types, several manufacturers have added to the murkiness by selling the very same formula in different guises, marketing each as a solution for a different individual issue.

                    So far I've found hypochlorous acid products being specifically marketed/labelled for: hand disinfecting, surgical disinfecting, eye care, eczema care, wound care, acne care, wrestling (the sport) care, tattoos/piercing care, animals/veterinary care, home surface cleaning, toy cleaning, nursery and high chair cleaning, pacifier cleaning, travel surface cleaning.

                    The field might conflate a bit, as the public learns more about hypochlorous acid's uses, and as more mainstream (like Lysol) and 'generic' manufacturers (I can imagine big chains of retailers producing their own-brand, general-use hypochlorous acid spray and selling it for a few dollars in their pharmacy areas, like bottles of hydrogen peroxide and rubbing alcohol are now) get into the area.

                    Caveat

                    The following information is what I have quickly compiled in the last couple of days. Before relying on anything here, please double-check it for yourself, to make sure that I recorded it correctly, and to ensure that the manufacturer hasn't changed the formulation in the meantime.

                    ====

                    Hypochlorous acid consumer products that I have been able to find - August 2018

                    A. Eye-specific hypochlorous acid products

                    A1. Avenova
                    Availability: prescription
                    Cost: expensive
                    Formula: 0.01% hypochlorous acid + (I don't know)% water + (I don't know)% sodium chloride + NO sodium hypochlorite

                    A2. Heyedrate
                    Availability: Over-the-counter
                    Cost: on Amazon, smaller bottle $16 per ounce, larger bottle $12.50 per ounce (both also available with Subscribe & Save at 5% or 15% off)
                    Formula: 0.015% hypochlorous acid + 99.085% water + 0.9% sodium chloride + NO sodium hypochlorite

                    A3. Ocusoft
                    Availability: Over-the-counter
                    Cost: on Amazon, small bottle $7 per ounce
                    Formula: 0.02% hypochlorous acid + 99.93% water + 0.048% sodium chloride + 0.002% sodium hypochlorite

                    I have not tried Avenova or Ocusoft, but for the last week I've been using Heyedrate, and I have had a good experience with it. I am sensitive to a LOT of stuff, but Heyedrate hasn't negatively affected my eyes, eyelids, or other facial skin. It feels gentle and refreshing when I spray/wipe it on my eyes.

                    ====
                    A general note on sodium hypochlorite in hypochlorous acid products:

                    All three of the above eye sprays have the ingredients of hypochlorous acid, water, and sodium chloride (in slightly differing amounts from each other),
                    while Ocusoft also has a 4th ingredient, sodium hypochlorite, which Heyedrate and Avenova claim not to have.

                    Sodium hypochlorite is apparently the main thing that household liquid chlorine bleach is made out of. (See Wikipedia for info.) Of course, it will be present in Ocusoft in just a tiny amount.

                    Apparently it is formed with some types of manufacturing processes, and with some pH levels (low pH levels of 3.5 to 5 apparently don't produce hypochlorous acid, but pH levels higher than that do), of the hypochlorous acid product.
                    I don't know the chemistry of this sort of thing, but various manufacturers have tried to explain it on their Amazon listings and on their own websites in the FAQ sections, so have a look at those if you are interested.

                    The hypochlorous acid spray manufacturers who include sodium hypochlorite in their sprays seem to claim that it helps the spray solution to remain effective and stable for a long time, even if the bottle has been opened/used,
                    while the hypochlorous acid spray manufacturers who leave it out of their sprays seem to claim that their sprays are therefore more pure and less potentially-irritating to the eyes and skin.

                    Some people appear to be sensitive to these tiny amounts of sodium hypochlorite -- I have seen Amazon reviews of Ocusoft (and other general topical hypochlorous acid products that the manufacturers said were safe to use near the eyes and which contain sodium hypochlorite) where users said that it did irritate their facial skin/eyes.

                    ====
                    A general note on anti-tampering features:

                    The bottle of Heyedrate that I ordered from Amazon last week came with a seal firmly connecting the sprayer head to the bottle, plus the bottle was sealed in a plastic pouch that had to be cut open (which makes it less easy for the product to be tampered with after it leaves the factory).
                    From what I have read in customer reviews, it appears that the Ocusoft bottle may not come sealed in any manner when ordered from Amazon.
                    Of course, Avenova is a prescription product that is distributed only by pharmacies and inherently has a more secure supply chain, plus it probably has a good seal on each bottle.

                    If the product you are ordering is not mailed directly from the manufacturer (such as the Briotech spray, which is described below) but is something that is normally shipped out from a third-party warehouse (like the Heyedrate and Ocusoft sprays are), then there is a chance of product substitution/tampering in the supply chain, and if a product is going to be used for medical purposes on delicate areas like the eyes, it gives the customer some peace of mind if it has an anti-tampering feature or seal (however rudimentary and easily-defeated that might be).

                    =====

                    B. Topical (skin) hypochlorous acid products:

                    B1. Topical (skin) hypochlorous acid products that say they have no sodium hypochlorite:

                    B1a. Briotech
                    Availability: Over-the-counter
                    Cost: on Amazon, smaller bottle $4.50 per ounce (including required shipping charge), larger bottle $2.88 per ounce (including required shipping charge)
                    Formula: 0.02% hypochlorous acid + 99.08% water + 0.9% sodium chloride + NO sodium hypochlorite

                    B1b. Curativa Bay Soothing Skin Mist
                    Availability: Over-the-counter
                    Cost: on Amazon, $3.75 per ounce
                    Formula: 0.02% hypochlorous acid + 99.08% water + 0.9% sodium chloride + NO sodium hypochlorite

                    B1c. Curativa Bay Skin Clarifier (which appears to be the same formula as above, but I could not find a specific composition stated, so it might have sodium hypochlorite after all)
                    Availability: Over-the-counter
                    Cost: on Amazon, $6.75 per ounce
                    Formula: (I don't know)% hypochlorous acid + (I don't know)% water + (I don't know)% sodium chloride + (I don't know)% sodium hypochlorite

                    B2. Topical (skin) hypochlorous acid products that say they contain sodium hypochlorite
                    (or that probably do have it, if the ingredient breakdown was not stated)

                    B2a. and B2b. SkinSmart Wound spray and Skinsmart Eczema spray
                    (the manufacturer says these two products have the same formula)
                    Availability: Over-the-counter
                    Cost: on Amazon, $1.88 per ounce for each one
                    Formula: 0.01% hypochlorous acid + 99.928% water + 0.06% sodium chloride + 0.002% sodium hypochlorite

                    B2c. Defense Antimicrobial
                    (the Defense spray says "powered by Simple Science" which is the manufacturer of SkinSmart and CleanSmart products, so maybe they licensed this SkinSmart formula from Simple Science)
                    Availability: Over-the-counter
                    Cost: on Amazon, $1.88 per ounce for the medium-sized bottle, $1.25 an ounce for the large bottle
                    Formula: 0.01% hypochlorous acid + 99.928% water + 0.06% sodium chloride + 0.002% sodium hypochlorite

                    B2d. Puracyn Plus
                    Availability: Over-the-counter
                    Cost: on Amazon, $1.69 per ounce
                    Formula: 0.012% hypochlorous acid + 99.916% water + 0.031% sodium chloride + 0.001% sodium hypochlorite + 0.04% phosphates

                    B2e. Active Skin Repair
                    (I don't remember if they said this contained sodium hypochlorite or not, but I had put this product in that section of my notes, so they probably did say that)
                    Availability: Over-the-counter
                    Cost: on Amazon, $8.00 per ounce
                    Formula: 0.012% hypochlorous acid + (I don't know)% water + (I don't know)% sodium chloride + (I don't know)% sodium hypochlorite + (I don't know)% phosphates

                    B2f. Active Anti-fungal
                    (I don't remember if they said this contained sodium hypochlorite or not, but I had put this product in that section of my notes, so they probably did say that)
                    Availability: Over-the-counter
                    Cost: on Amazon, $8.00 per ounce
                    Formula: 0.01% hypochlorous acid + (I don't know)% water + (I don't know)% sodium chloride + (I don't know)% sodium hypochlorite + (I don't know)% phosphates + (I don't know)% Lithium, Magnesium, Sodium Silicate, Sodium Bicarbonate, and Sodium Sulfate

                    B2g. Vache Wound Therapy
                    (I did not find the actual breakdown of the ingredients)
                    Availability: Over-the-counter
                    Cost: on Amazon, small bottle $3.25 per ounce, large bottle $3.65 per ounce
                    Formula: (I don't know)% hypochlorous acid + (I don't know)% water + (I don't know)% sodium chloride + (I don't know)% sodium hypochlorite

                    B2f. Alevicyn Wound care
                    Availability: Prescription
                    Cost: I don't know
                    Formula: (I don't know)% hypochlorous acid + (I don't know)% water + (I don't know)% sodium chloride + (I don't know; may not have any)% sodium hypochlorite

                    C. Hypochlorous acid products meant for pet care and other veterinary purposes

                    I don't have pets and I did not look into this category, though I did see at least one such product for sale on Amazon

                    D. Cleaning hypochlorous acid products meant for hard surfaces

                    D1. CleanSmart brand of cleaning spray, cleaning mist, toy cleaner, nursery/high chair cleaner, pacifier cleaner, hand sanitizer
                    (manufacturer claims that all have the same formula)
                    Availability: Over-the-counter
                    Cost: on Amazon, depends on the type and size -- examples include 28 cents per ounce and $2.00 per ounce
                    Formula: 0.017% hypochlorous acid + 99.919% water + 0.06% sodium chloride + 0.004% sodium hypochlorite

                    D2. Lysol Daily Cleansing spray
                    Availability: Over-the-counter (online and in bricks-and-mortar stores)
                    Cost: about 19 cents an ounce
                    Formula: 0.017% hypochlorous acid + (I don't know)% water + "less than 0.5%" sodium chloride + (I don't know) sodium hypochlorite
                    Note: The special ingredient-list website for this product says that the pH is "6.7 to 7.3". I think I read that, at that high of a pH, there will be some sodium hypochlorite in a hypochlorous acid spray.”
                    Last edited by MariaSt; 16 September 2018, 03:50 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Ossau View Post
                      Could hypochlorous acid be used to kill malassezia? I’ve read that it’s antifungal against Candida and other fungi, but can’t find anything for malassezia

                      It seems safe enough to try though, I’m going to spray it on my scalp before shampooing
                      Ossau, I managed to find the following data that lists malassezia furfur. It's from a pharmaceutical company's own testing though.

                      How has your use of HOCL been going?

                      screenshot-levicyn.com-2018.10.07-15-00-49.jpg

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by MariaSt View Post
                        I came across a long review on a hypochlorous acid product sold on Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/Hypochlorous-.../dp/B06VW5J11K) and I copy-paste it here, as it’s worth reading:
                        “In the last week, I have done a brief survey of the hypochlorous acid products that are available in the marketplace.
                        It's certainly not an exhaustive list, and I have not personally tried most of them, but I will summarize below the information that I've compiled, in the hopes that it will help other people, for whatever reason they are interested in hypochlorous acid -- whether for eye ailments (like dry eye, meibomian gland problems, demodex infection), skin ailments (like rosacea, acne, eczema), wound care, pet care, household cleaning, etc.

                        Varied branding, marketing, packaging

                        The market landscape for hypochlorous acid products that are meant to be used by the general public (on their bodies, their pets' bodies, or for surface cleaning) is complicated. Not only are there different prescription and over-the-counter brands, concentrations, formulations, manufacturing methods, and packaging types, several manufacturers have added to the murkiness by selling the very same formula in different guises, marketing each as a solution for a different individual issue.

                        So far I've found hypochlorous acid products being specifically marketed/labelled for: hand disinfecting, surgical disinfecting, eye care, eczema care, wound care, acne care, wrestling (the sport) care, tattoos/piercing care, animals/veterinary care, home surface cleaning, toy cleaning, nursery and high chair cleaning, pacifier cleaning, travel surface cleaning.

                        The field might conflate a bit, as the public learns more about hypochlorous acid's uses, and as more mainstream (like Lysol) and 'generic' manufacturers (I can imagine big chains of retailers producing their own-brand, general-use hypochlorous acid spray and selling it for a few dollars in their pharmacy areas, like bottles of hydrogen peroxide and rubbing alcohol are now) get into the area.

                        Caveat

                        The following information is what I have quickly compiled in the last couple of days. Before relying on anything here, please double-check it for yourself, to make sure that I recorded it correctly, and to ensure that the manufacturer hasn't changed the formulation in the meantime.

                        ====

                        Hypochlorous acid consumer products that I have been able to find - August 2018

                        A. Eye-specific hypochlorous acid products

                        A1. Avenova
                        Availability: prescription
                        Cost: expensive
                        Formula: 0.01% hypochlorous acid + (I don't know)% water + (I don't know)% sodium chloride + NO sodium hypochlorite

                        A2. Heyedrate
                        Availability: Over-the-counter
                        Cost: on Amazon, smaller bottle $16 per ounce, larger bottle $12.50 per ounce (both also available with Subscribe & Save at 5% or 15% off)
                        Formula: 0.015% hypochlorous acid + 99.085% water + 0.9% sodium chloride + NO sodium hypochlorite

                        A3. Ocusoft
                        Availability: Over-the-counter
                        Cost: on Amazon, small bottle $7 per ounce
                        Formula: 0.02% hypochlorous acid + 99.93% water + 0.048% sodium chloride + 0.002% sodium hypochlorite

                        I have not tried Avenova or Ocusoft, but for the last week I've been using Heyedrate, and I have had a good experience with it. I am sensitive to a LOT of stuff, but Heyedrate hasn't negatively affected my eyes, eyelids, or other facial skin. It feels gentle and refreshing when I spray/wipe it on my eyes.

                        ====
                        A general note on sodium hypochlorite in hypochlorous acid products:

                        All three of the above eye sprays have the ingredients of hypochlorous acid, water, and sodium chloride (in slightly differing amounts from each other),
                        while Ocusoft also has a 4th ingredient, sodium hypochlorite, which Heyedrate and Avenova claim not to have.

                        Sodium hypochlorite is apparently the main thing that household liquid chlorine bleach is made out of. (See Wikipedia for info.) Of course, it will be present in Ocusoft in just a tiny amount.

                        Apparently it is formed with some types of manufacturing processes, and with some pH levels (low pH levels of 3.5 to 5 apparently don't produce hypochlorous acid, but pH levels higher than that do), of the hypochlorous acid product.
                        I don't know the chemistry of this sort of thing, but various manufacturers have tried to explain it on their Amazon listings and on their own websites in the FAQ sections, so have a look at those if you are interested.

                        The hypochlorous acid spray manufacturers who include sodium hypochlorite in their sprays seem to claim that it helps the spray solution to remain effective and stable for a long time, even if the bottle has been opened/used,
                        while the hypochlorous acid spray manufacturers who leave it out of their sprays seem to claim that their sprays are therefore more pure and less potentially-irritating to the eyes and skin.

                        Some people appear to be sensitive to these tiny amounts of sodium hypochlorite -- I have seen Amazon reviews of Ocusoft (and other general topical hypochlorous acid products that the manufacturers said were safe to use near the eyes and which contain sodium hypochlorite) where users said that it did irritate their facial skin/eyes.

                        ====
                        A general note on anti-tampering features:

                        The bottle of Heyedrate that I ordered from Amazon last week came with a seal firmly connecting the sprayer head to the bottle, plus the bottle was sealed in a plastic pouch that had to be cut open (which makes it less easy for the product to be tampered with after it leaves the factory).
                        From what I have read in customer reviews, it appears that the Ocusoft bottle may not come sealed in any manner when ordered from Amazon.
                        Of course, Avenova is a prescription product that is distributed only by pharmacies and inherently has a more secure supply chain, plus it probably has a good seal on each bottle.

                        If the product you are ordering is not mailed directly from the manufacturer (such as the Briotech spray, which is described below) but is something that is normally shipped out from a third-party warehouse (like the Heyedrate and Ocusoft sprays are), then there is a chance of product substitution/tampering in the supply chain, and if a product is going to be used for medical purposes on delicate areas like the eyes, it gives the customer some peace of mind if it has an anti-tampering feature or seal (however rudimentary and easily-defeated that might be).

                        =====

                        B. Topical (skin) hypochlorous acid products:

                        B1. Topical (skin) hypochlorous acid products that say they have no sodium hypochlorite:

                        B1a. Briotech
                        Availability: Over-the-counter
                        Cost: on Amazon, smaller bottle $4.50 per ounce (including required shipping charge), larger bottle $2.88 per ounce (including required shipping charge)
                        Formula: 0.02% hypochlorous acid + 99.08% water + 0.9% sodium chloride + NO sodium hypochlorite

                        B1b. Curativa Bay Soothing Skin Mist
                        Availability: Over-the-counter
                        Cost: on Amazon, $3.75 per ounce
                        Formula: 0.02% hypochlorous acid + 99.08% water + 0.9% sodium chloride + NO sodium hypochlorite

                        B1c. Curativa Bay Skin Clarifier (which appears to be the same formula as above, but I could not find a specific composition stated, so it might have sodium hypochlorite after all)
                        Availability: Over-the-counter
                        Cost: on Amazon, $6.75 per ounce
                        Formula: (I don't know)% hypochlorous acid + (I don't know)% water + (I don't know)% sodium chloride + (I don't know)% sodium hypochlorite

                        B2. Topical (skin) hypochlorous acid products that say they contain sodium hypochlorite
                        (or that probably do have it, if the ingredient breakdown was not stated)

                        B2a. and B2b. SkinSmart Wound spray and Skinsmart Eczema spray
                        (the manufacturer says these two products have the same formula)
                        Availability: Over-the-counter
                        Cost: on Amazon, $1.88 per ounce for each one
                        Formula: 0.01% hypochlorous acid + 99.928% water + 0.06% sodium chloride + 0.002% sodium hypochlorite

                        B2c. Defense Antimicrobial
                        (the Defense spray says "powered by Simple Science" which is the manufacturer of SkinSmart and CleanSmart products, so maybe they licensed this SkinSmart formula from Simple Science)
                        Availability: Over-the-counter
                        Cost: on Amazon, $1.88 per ounce for the medium-sized bottle, $1.25 an ounce for the large bottle
                        Formula: 0.01% hypochlorous acid + 99.928% water + 0.06% sodium chloride + 0.002% sodium hypochlorite

                        B2d. Puracyn Plus
                        Availability: Over-the-counter
                        Cost: on Amazon, $1.69 per ounce
                        Formula: 0.012% hypochlorous acid + 99.916% water + 0.031% sodium chloride + 0.001% sodium hypochlorite + 0.04% phosphates

                        B2e. Active Skin Repair
                        (I don't remember if they said this contained sodium hypochlorite or not, but I had put this product in that section of my notes, so they probably did say that)
                        Availability: Over-the-counter
                        Cost: on Amazon, $8.00 per ounce
                        Formula: 0.012% hypochlorous acid + (I don't know)% water + (I don't know)% sodium chloride + (I don't know)% sodium hypochlorite + (I don't know)% phosphates

                        B2f. Active Anti-fungal
                        (I don't remember if they said this contained sodium hypochlorite or not, but I had put this product in that section of my notes, so they probably did say that)
                        Availability: Over-the-counter
                        Cost: on Amazon, $8.00 per ounce
                        Formula: 0.01% hypochlorous acid + (I don't know)% water + (I don't know)% sodium chloride + (I don't know)% sodium hypochlorite + (I don't know)% phosphates + (I don't know)% Lithium, Magnesium, Sodium Silicate, Sodium Bicarbonate, and Sodium Sulfate

                        B2g. Vache Wound Therapy
                        (I did not find the actual breakdown of the ingredients)
                        Availability: Over-the-counter
                        Cost: on Amazon, small bottle $3.25 per ounce, large bottle $3.65 per ounce
                        Formula: (I don't know)% hypochlorous acid + (I don't know)% water + (I don't know)% sodium chloride + (I don't know)% sodium hypochlorite

                        B2f. Alevicyn Wound care
                        Availability: Prescription
                        Cost: I don't know
                        Formula: (I don't know)% hypochlorous acid + (I don't know)% water + (I don't know)% sodium chloride + (I don't know; may not have any)% sodium hypochlorite

                        C. Hypochlorous acid products meant for pet care and other veterinary purposes

                        I don't have pets and I did not look into this category, though I did see at least one such product for sale on Amazon

                        D. Cleaning hypochlorous acid products meant for hard surfaces

                        D1. CleanSmart brand of cleaning spray, cleaning mist, toy cleaner, nursery/high chair cleaner, pacifier cleaner, hand sanitizer
                        (manufacturer claims that all have the same formula)
                        Availability: Over-the-counter
                        Cost: on Amazon, depends on the type and size -- examples include 28 cents per ounce and $2.00 per ounce
                        Formula: 0.017% hypochlorous acid + 99.919% water + 0.06% sodium chloride + 0.004% sodium hypochlorite

                        D2. Lysol Daily Cleansing spray
                        Availability: Over-the-counter (online and in bricks-and-mortar stores)
                        Cost: about 19 cents an ounce
                        Formula: 0.017% hypochlorous acid + (I don't know)% water + "less than 0.5%" sodium chloride + (I don't know) sodium hypochlorite
                        Note: The special ingredient-list website for this product says that the pH is "6.7 to 7.3". I think I read that, at that high of a pH, there will be some sodium hypochlorite in a hypochlorous acid spray.”
                        Have you ever looked into Lumion skincare? They have a serum with HOCL that I want to try. I also am going to try the Briotech spray soon as a facial mist. The ingredients in the Lumion serum are electrolyzed oxygenated water, sodium magnesium fluorosilicate, sodium chloride (Dead Sea salts), hypochlorous acid, hydrogen chloride. Any thoughts on this?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Capture531, it is so interesting how you dug up an old post (over a year ago this was discussed). Let us know your results with Lumion skincare.
                          Brady Barrows
                          Blog - Join the RRDi


                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Capture531 View Post
                            Have you ever looked into Lumion skincare? They have a serum with HOCL that I want to try. I also am going to try the Briotech spray soon as a facial mist. The ingredients in the Lumion serum are electrolyzed oxygenated water, sodium magnesium fluorosilicate, sodium chloride (Dead Sea salts), hypochlorous acid, hydrogen chloride. Any thoughts on this?
                            My opinion is that the Lumion products are overpriced compared to other hypochlorous acid products that are available, and differ only in their inclusion of "electrolysed oxygentaed water" which seems more of a marketing gimmick than anything actually beneficial for the skin.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by sejon View Post
                              My opinion is that the Lumion products are overpriced compared to other hypochlorous acid products that are available, and differ only in their inclusion of "electrolysed oxygentaed water" which seems more of a marketing gimmick than anything actually beneficial for the skin.
                              I kind of got that vibe as well. There seems to be some debate on shelf life of HOCL. I have read some material that usually after about 1-2 months it returns to just the normal saline its in. Any suggestions on good brands? I was gonna give Briotech a try. There is also some conflicting info on whether it even affects demodex. Wondering if it had any activity against M. furfur actually...

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