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Candida Biofilms are stopped with Farnesol

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  • Candida Biofilms are stopped with Farnesol

    Here’s an interesting article, “Farnesol-mediated inhibition of Candida albicans yeast growth,” found at: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/yea.1501/pdf

    This article reports that farnesol stops candida biofilms by preventing the yeast form from switching to the hyphal form. I think the hyphal form is probably a necessary stage in the formation of a biofilm.

    My best guess is that farnesol will break down any yeast biofilm because malassezia and candida appear to be similar in this respect.

    Farnesol is a natural oily alcohol found in essential oils and plant species such as lily, jasmine, rose, chamomile, green tea and many more.

    Farnesol is apparently very effective in very low concentrations, probably about 0.02%, and the retail cost for 5 grams of 95% farnesol is $48 including shipping. I ordered some today from a chem lab supply store.

    If you read the article, keep in mind that μM means a micromole, an SI unit equal to 10^−6 mole. For example, 1 mole (6.02x10^23) of water molecules, with a molecular weight of 18 grams per mole, weighs 18 grams and occupies 18 ml of volume. So when the article discusses 100 μM of farnesol, assuming farnesol has a molecular weight similar to water, the article is using about 0.018 grams of farnesol.

    If any of my math is incorrect, or if I misunderstood the article, I would greatly appreciate being corrected by people with a chemistry background.

  • #2
    All right, now I'm certain I need some help with my math, because I just learned that water has a molecular weight of 18 grams per Mole, but farsenol has a molecular weight of 222.37 grams per Mole.

    So should I multiply my estimates (above) by a factor of about twelve? Because 222 is 12 times greater than 18? And so, I should not have written 0.03%, but instead I should have written 0.36% farsenol?

    Comment


    • #3
      Hey Tom, I'm no chemist and not good at the math stuff. I have been reading about biofilms for that last two days and experimented with some home mixes. I knew something about xylitol used in the holistic dental because I have listen to a podcasts on natural/holistic healing for a few years. I noticed that Xylitol kept appearing l in some medical research papers & sites. Since my doctor told me to use this for my coffee sweetener I had some at home. Yesterday I started experimenting with the xylitol. I mixed with water, creams, lotions and applied to my face and let stay on for a while then face followed by washing with either pine tar soap or another yeast killing topical. It really works! Then I read up on which essential oils that may naturally have Farnesol. I have a good collection essential oils but the only one I had at home on the listed was Jasmine. I incorporated some of that oil in a lotion cream and used it after applying the xylitol water. I'm not sure if adding the Jasmine essential oil helped because the results from xylitol are so extreme. I just hope it does not stop working as many other topicals in the past, but maybe it was due to the protective biofilm.

      If this continues to work on the biofilm protecting the yeast in something similar to layers (not getting to scientific) it may be possible to remove this in a much shorter time period than the months expected.

      I'm really excited about this but want to give warning to others. This is not something for beginners. It would be best that you try some of weaker yeast treatments/topicals before trying these products. This is not dangerous and I'm not trying to be bossy, but unless you have read and know the basics on yeast/fungus/mycosis it may freak someone out. The results that I got today may send some running to the ER because I have never seen anything comparable other than 2nd/3rd degree burn that is healing/peeling. I knew it was not really my skin but the biofilm.


      There are a few sites with similar comments about these two ingredients. Here is the link and a snip of the paper where I got the basic info and idea to experiment.

      http://www.skintherapyletter.com/2012/17.7/1.html


      "Atopic dermatitis (AD) affects 10-20% of children with 60% of cases occurring within a child's first year and 85% before the age of 5.23 Although spontaneous resolution is seen in a majority of patients by 18 years of age, many cases persist into adulthood as evidenced by the 1-3% prevalence of AD among the adult population.24 It is well known that AD patients are colonized with S. aureus and this organism has been shown to exist in both dry skin as well as areas of severe dermatitis.25 Disease severity has been directly correlated to the degree of S. aureus colonization and therapy generally fails to improve symptoms in the presence of high S. aureus counts.26 CLSM has demonstrated the presence of biofilms on mouse skin inoculated with AD S. aureus isolates,27 as well as in skin stripping and biopsy specimens from 11 AD patients.9

      The difficulty in eradicating S. aureus colonization with conventional antibiotic therapy may be due to the presence of biofilms. It is hypothesized that normal skin microflora, such as Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis), has an important role in suppressing the growth of S. aureus by metabolizing sebum and, thus, creating a low pH environment that is inhibitory to pathogenic organisms.28 Since S. aureus and S. epidermidis exhibit similar antibiotic susceptibility, a logical rationale for therapy may be to specifically target S. aureus biofilm. A recent in vitro study29 examined the effects of farnesol and xylitol on S. aureus biofilms and showed that each agent alone inhibited a different stage of biofilm formation and, when used concomitantly, they inhibited biofilm formation and also disrupted mature biofilm. The MIC of farnesol was lower for S. aureus than S. epidermidis, indicating the potential of this agent to selectively target the pathogenic organism. In a clinical study of 17 patients with AD,28 a 0.02% farnesol and 5% xylitol (FX) combination emollient cream significantly decreased the number of S. aureus organisms, as well as the ratio of S. aureus to total aerobic skin microflora with an observed increase in coagulase-negative staphylococci. S. aureus biofilm, demonstrated in the intercellular spaces of the stratum corneum prior to therapy, was completely absent after 7 days of FX topical application. No adverse effects of FX were noted after 4 weeks of therapy. Ideal topical agents for the treatment of AD should selectively reduce pathogenic biofilm and restore the balance of skin microflora without the irritant effects typically seen with current topical germicides.29 "
      Samilynn
      Senior Member
      Last edited by Samilynn; 25 July 2013, 03:51 AM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Samilynn View Post
        There are a few sites with similar comments about these two ingredients. Here is the link and a snip of the paper where I got the basic info and idea to experiment.

        http://www.skintherapyletter.com/2012/17.7/1.html
        Research into bioflims is so exciting. Thanks Tom and Samilynn for your information. I particularly like the conclusion of the above report:

        "... In the field of dermatology, biofilms appear to be taking center stage, and their presence likely explains the chronic nature of many cutaneous disorders. It is expected that further knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms that govern biofilm formation, their virulence, and drug resistance will vastly improve the limited therapeutic options currently available to today's clinician."

        Yaaay!!!

        Comment


        • #5
          All this is bringing back memories of a David Flemming and his topical fluconazole/DMSO experiment.

          Actually, I have been thinking about this independently of this thread due to my and my doctor's suspicion that I have a fungal component to my disease.

          I can't help with the math either, but that aside, have you ever considered tinkering with DMSO, Tom?

          You might find the following interesting. Another rosacean adventurer. Ok, he wasn't treating a fungal infection, but you might find some of the ingredients he used, interesting. Particularly the green tea, thymol.
          DMSO has benefits other than being a great penetrator and carrier.

          http://www.neopax.com/Artemis/rosacea/

          Sorry about the derailing of topic, although it is still related.
          Previous Numerous IPL.
          Supplements: High dose Niacinamide, Vit K2, low dose Vit A. Moderate Dose Vit C, Iodine, Taurine, Magnesium. Mod- dose B's. Low dose zinc. Testing Quercetin.

          Skin Care: No Cleanser, ZZ cream mixed with Niacinamide gel 4% and LMW HA 2%, ethyl ascorbate 2%.

          Treating for gut dysbiosis.(This is helping).
          Previous GAPS diet. Have now introduced lots of fibre.
          Fermented Foods. Intermittent fasting -16-18 hours.
          Oral Colostrum. Helps reduce food reactions.

          Comment


          • #6
            In ref. to DMSO. I have been tinkering with it for aprox. 3 years, after my breast cancer ordeal I was interested in alternative/holistic healing. This was way before my skin issues this year. Even my new doctor Trowbridge said he cannot legally endorse DMSO and actually has a clinic hand out paper with his observations & precautions. Since I brought up the subject of DMSO he show some positive excitement about DMSO's healing capabilities. He said let me be perfectly clear I cannot prescribe nor persuade the use of DMSO because of the state medial board. His hand out gives some cautions but does give links to DMSO sites and the work of Stanley Jacob MD. DMSO is mentioned in Trobridges book The yeast syndrome which was co-authored by Morton Walker, who also wrote the book DMSO Natures Healer.

            I read up on DMSO extensively and and know how to use and store it safely. I have the 99.99% pure gel and the liquid. I started the use of DMSO with my dog's skin issues a few years ago. She had some completely bald hair less spots and with the application of DMSO I could see new hair growing in that spot within 2 days. It can be a great healing product if used properly but it also can do some damage if you are not educated on the subject. I have mixed a very small amount with many of my topical included the 2 % Nizoral shampoo but use it sparingly. The only negative thing I can say is if you use it topically on a large area on take it internally is the bad sulpher, rotten egg stinky smell. My family complains about this smell and iit may take a day or more to go away. That is one of the main reasons I don't use it much or is because you stink so bad due the to chemical process mix with our individual bodies.

            I will be interested in your link provided.

            Comment


            • #7
              Farnesol and xylitol are also reviewed here, in the first four pages: http://synapse.koreamed.org/Synapse/Data/PDFData/0166AAIR/aair-2-235.pdf .

              Apparently farnesol and xylitol are also used to treat dry skin rashes, which I think are usually called atopic dermatitis. Is this true?

              David Fleming's work is very well done, and his write up is great too. Thanks for the link!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Tom Busby View Post
                Farnesol and xylitol are also reviewed here, in the first four pages: http://synapse.koreamed.org/Synapse/...aair-2-235.pdf .

                Apparently farnesol and xylitol are also used to treat dry skin rashes, which I think are usually called atopic dermatitis. Is this true?

                David Fleming's work is very well done, and his write up is great too. Thanks for the link!
                Link not working even with a copy paste.

                As far as the atopic dermatitis in my opinion - I think most doc's just do the Eeny, meeny, miny, moe to name most skin rashes. I requested several look at mine with magnification and/or do a scrape biopsy and all refused. They all insisted on their medical diagnosis from just a quick glance. I now have about 6 different scientific medical names for this mess on my face and body. Also 1 MD and 1 dermatologist thought they should dable in the psychiatric field and make a diagnosis. Because I seem obsessed with my face issues and then I tried to explain and showed them the yeast hypea spores that had landed on my reading glasses. Who would not be obsessed with something like this just showing up one day and no past history of skin issues. They have no idea what it's like to be suddenly disfigured and that it changes the way you look and the way you live every day.

                OK, rant over.

                *edit to add - now the links working. Thanks.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Tim and Samilyyn, thanks for sharing your research again, this sounds really encouraging. Someday in the not too distant future, a generation will be born that does not have to suffer from skin disease. As someone who has suffered with eczema all my life, that notion really makes me smile.

                  I have been making my own mix of roughly equal parts Nizoral, ACV, Cetaphill and (melted) petroleum jelly which I apply to my face twice a day. Good results so far, it keeps my skin soft, moist and relatively flake free... I have a massive build up of biofilm on my chin and around the base of my neck and collar bone area though. It appears to be very entrenched and it's going to take a long time to shift it... I expect to add Xylitol and some essential oil (containing Farnesol) to my arsenal this weekend and will report back.

                  Tom, do you have any idea which essential oil has the highest concentration of Farnesol?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Davo View Post
                    Tom, do you have any idea which essential oil has the highest concentration of Farnesol?
                    In February 2008 I posted that someone wrote to the UK Times newspaper saying they'd attained good results from applying sandalwood oil and a thread began on this subject.

                    I found this 'essential' oil to be very potent. It needed to be mixed with a carrier oil but for the sake of getting rid of biofilms I think it might work very well as I understand Australian sandalwood contains high amounts of Farnesol.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Tom Busby View Post
                      Farnesol and xylitol are also reviewed here, in the first four pages: http://synapse.koreamed.org/Synapse/...aair-2-235.pdf .

                      Apparently farnesol and xylitol are also used to treat dry skin rashes, which I think are usually called atopic dermatitis. Is this true?

                      David Fleming's work is very well done, and his write up is great too. Thanks for the link!
                      Just to clarify, David Flemming is not the man in the link. He used to post in the yahoo support group.
                      Brady Barrows would be able to provide a direct link to the blog. Also, Brady tried the treatment himself.
                      I have only come across one other person who tried it. A lady, who seemed to be getting results, but didn't continue posting, so I don't know what happened in the end.
                      What I found curious about David and the Lady, is that only the abnormal skin only reacted to the fluconazole/DMSO.
                      That has to be a clue.
                      Previous Numerous IPL.
                      Supplements: High dose Niacinamide, Vit K2, low dose Vit A. Moderate Dose Vit C, Iodine, Taurine, Magnesium. Mod- dose B's. Low dose zinc. Testing Quercetin.

                      Skin Care: No Cleanser, ZZ cream mixed with Niacinamide gel 4% and LMW HA 2%, ethyl ascorbate 2%.

                      Treating for gut dysbiosis.(This is helping).
                      Previous GAPS diet. Have now introduced lots of fibre.
                      Fermented Foods. Intermittent fasting -16-18 hours.
                      Oral Colostrum. Helps reduce food reactions.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Mistica View Post
                        Just to clarify, David Flemming is not the man in the link. He used to post in the yahoo support group.
                        Brady Barrows would be able to provide a direct link to the blog. Also, Brady tried the treatment himself.
                        I have only come across one other person who tried it. A lady, who seemed to be getting results, but didn't continue posting, so I don't know what happened in the end.
                        What I found curious about David and the Lady, is that only the abnormal skin only reacted to the fluconazole/DMSO.
                        That has to be a clue.
                        In my experience dealing with DMSO applications gel or liquid if you applied on the skin un-diluted. It will dry your skin out extremely fast, so wash your hands quickly after any contact. Other than the extreme drying to the skin not to effect healthy skin in my experience. It's best to keep in in the area of treatment for the damaged skin. It will take what ever product you mix it with or layer before/after the applications and exaggerator/penetrate the skin and tissues immediately. When I use it anywhere on my body, even my feet within a minute I can taste the dmso in my mouth. Strange. It's a wonderful product but you do need to know all the precautions, like never use any type of poison or pesticide around the same time that may come into contact. There are many scared to use this and we should take the precautions because I think DMSO can cross the blood/brain barrier that most products cannot do. Really it is common sense stuff that you would use with other house hold toxic chemicals like ammonia or bleach. But some times people don't think and end up with bad results. They have been using DMSO under the radar more than 50 years and also commonly used by the professional athletic trainers and players. I have heard DMSO is one of the snicky nasty smells you get when you enter a professional athletic locker rooms. They just don't advertise this info because it is not FDA approved and legally can only be prescribed by doctors for a in a few states.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Davo, here’s some information about farnesol:
                          Presence of this terpene alcohol in nature has been reported in more than 30 essential oils. Levels are generally low (0.5-1.0%) with exception of cabreuva, which contains up to 2.5% farnesol, & distillate from flowers of oxystigma buccholtzii harms up to 18%. Among essential oils containing farnesol are ceylon citronella, cananga, ambrette seeds, ylang-ylang, acacia farnesiana, palmarosa. [Fenaroli's Handbook of Flavor Ingredients. Volume 2. Edited, translated, and revised by T.E. Furia and N. Bellanca. 2nd ed. Cleveland: The Chemical Rubber Co., 1975., p. 201]

                          Farnesol is found in oils of citronella, neroli, cyclamen, lemon grass, tuberose, rose, musk, balsam peru, and tolu. It is found in many flowers and other essential oils such as cassia and cananga. [(1) O'Neil MJ, ed; The Merck. 13th Edition, Whitehouse Station, NJ: Merck and Co., Inc., p. 697 (2001) (2) Lewis RJ Sr, ed; Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary. 14th ed. NY, NY: John Wiley & Sons, p. 484 (2001)]

                          The problem with all essential oils is that the smell is overwhelming. I’ve never been able to tolerate any more than 0.3% essential oils in a compounded lotion or shampoo, but researchers in Thailand and Italy report that lemongrass oil is an effective antifungal when used at a 2% concentration. cornetis.pl/pliki/ML/2010/2/ML_2010_2_79.pdf; www.tm.mahidol.ac.th/seameo/2011-42-2/18-5046.pdf; www.tm.mahidol.ac.th/seameo/2011-42-2/18-5046.pdf.

                          Good luck using 2% Lemongrass oil -- it smells exactly like Lemon Pledge Furniture Polish, so people will asked if you spilled furniture polish on yourself. Not a feasible treatment option, IMO. I’m hoping that farnesol has a more functional smell, and I like the research on this EO because farnesol apparently is effective at 0.2%. I’m not adding any xylitol (at first) in order to see if farnesol by itself has any effect.

                          Also, I’ve found that adding 5% Aquaphor to a lotion knocks the EO smell down a little. Heat the Aquaphor in a small bowl like you were poaching an egg, but only to 120 degrees F so it melts and becomes a liquid instead of a gel, and then mix in an equal amount of plain lotion, so the Aquaphor will stay emulsified. Without this step, the Aquaphor won’t go into solution and will just be clumpy in the lotion.

                          I like the smell of Vetiver cologne by Guerlain, and here’s my custom blend of EO’s that smells close to that. In 250 ml of lotion, I add 0.4 ml of VetMix and 0.3 ml of RoseMix so these EO mixes are 0.3% of the lotion. These two are premixes, because it isn’t practical to add just one “drop” of EO at a time directly into a lotion, because a "drop" depends on temperature and viscosity and how the dropper is held, and also, if you make a mistake and spill an extra drop into a lotion you can rapidly spoil the whole batch. Plus, when making a premix, if you added 21 drops instead of 20 drops it will barely affect the result. (The names of the premixes are just made up so I can write something on the label). Read the text below like it was a table, or copy it and use Word to turn the text into a table, as I couldn't paste-in my table. A "d" is drop. These premixes evolved out making small batches in a shot glass:

                          RoseMix Oils: Palmarosa Rosewood Rose Blend Clary Sage Ultrazur G
                          Total Drops= 10d 10d 20d 20d 5d
                          Plus 4 ml isopropanol as a carrier

                          VetMix Oils: Oregano Vetiver Vetiver Haitian Ylang Kanuka Manuka Myrrh Spikenard Pepper Tulsi Oil LemonGrass Cinnamon Leaf
                          Amount 1ml 20d 60d 20d 20d 10d 10d 20d 20d 20d 6ml 5d
                          Plus 5 ml isopropanol as a carrier

                          EO's are quite an investment of time and money, but if you balance that against the sky high price of a good cologne and that all colognes are now 100% synthetic, the idea of using EO's makes sense, and pricewise you get to the break even point in about a year. Plus EO's are anti-fungal and and anti-bacterial.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Attached is an image of the two EO mixes in table form:

                            RoseMix Oils-image.jpg

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Here’s my mini novel update today. This is just a FYI and just putting this info out there for others. It is based on my individual opinion, reading and results of skin experiments in the last few days. I was using products that I had at home as I have not made a trip to the store yet.

                              The xylitol sweeter product that I have been using is the crystal type in packets. It dissolves easily in water but I have not had any luck getting it to dissolve in a carrier like almond oil with some essential oil added that may contain farnesol. It just stays in crystal form clumped with the oil. From what I have read from other sites/forums the powder form is an easier mix. I will pick some up in the next few days.

                              I don't think it necessary that these two products be mixed together to get results. I’m no chemist but I believe they work differently and independently. I have used separate applications. One with water mix and the xylitol (ok, I added a few drops of DMSO) then followed by a cream that had a few drops of Jasmine & the essential oil that I hope contained enough Farnesol. It’s hard to tell because I actually I got some amazing results using only the xylitol water mix. So far I cannot see much difference by adding the essential oil Jasmine & lavender (just what I had on hand at home) cream mix that may or may not contain enough farnesol. I picked up some rose water EO today and will try something with it later.

                              I am still somewhat dumbstruck that these large plaques of yeasts can hide in plain sight on our skin. I am sure I am the proud owner of several various types. Different products show different places where it has been living. I have used so many yeast killing topicals. Before I used the xylitol it seemed the Nizeral shampoo and honey where the most revealing. I’m just going to list a some of the products that seemed to work the best for me recently in the war on fungus .

                              I just started using Grandpa’s pine tar soap as a GNC employee said it works great on yeast. I used it for my body and hair the entire week I was on vacation/cruise as it was easy to pack, with no bottles and mixing to take on my vacation. I was surprised just how good it worked everywhere. Including stuff on my scalp and my hands that peeled like crazy. I am almost a neurotic hand washer after having staph infections in the past years. I know all these other yeast killing products get on my hands but until I usged this soap none had shown that I had some type of fungal build up on my hands until now.
                              I
                              Colloidal silver (many strengths available) . After using the kill products it seems CS helps with some type of action to make this stuff come right off without much damage to the skin. It has some antifungal/antibacterial properties. It seems to unstick and soften what’s left of the bioflm glue stuff.
                              The other product is EDAP cream I know products containing oils have had some bad reactions to many people’s SD making it worse. This does not seem to be the case for me when I use this product. This cream is from my doctor’s office but can be purchased many places on the web here is just one link if interested in the ingredients http://www.vmmedical.com/400.htm.

                              EDAP cream. My doctor prescribed this to use 2 times a day. I had stopped using EDAP for about 2 weeks as I ran low and thought maybe the oils may be feeding the malassezia yeast. In my individual case I found it helps and does not worsen my skin but helps the whole process of healing and exfoliation. My doctor must know this stuff works great on the healing the skin, scars and maybe biofilms. I went back and purchased two more jars because my visiting son used up my remaining product of EDAP cream for his sun burn damage (stationed in HI) and new recent sunburn & sea water/sand rash from our recent vacation. All the nurses in the clinic office told me they use on their entire body and say they can’t live without it.

                              @ Tom, I agree on the some of the smell, I could not use that mix with the Jasmine one more day. Yuk. I am looking forward to hearing other’s reviews, opinions and results on xylitol and/or Farnesol. This is all about sharing and learning to heal.

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