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How to reverse the effects of long-term antibiotic use?

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  • How to reverse the effects of long-term antibiotic use?

    Basically I'd be grateful to be pointed in the direction of any discussion/advice relating to the thread title (my GP was of little/no help).

    I have spent a cumulative total of probably around 4 years or so on daily oral antibiotics to treat acne/rosacea-type issues (also used topicals, but at a much lower frequency). I was even advised at least once by a consultant dermatologist to stay on them permanently, advice I'm glad to say I dismissed.

    I've since to come to realise however that I no longer suffer from my 'original' skin condition, but others that were most likely triggered by various forms of treatment I've employed over the years. For example, my main issue today relates to sebhorreic dermatitis, which my doctor agrees was almost certainly caused or triggered by antibiotic use (these symptoms had existed for a long time but flared very significantly during my last course, which was actually helpful in that it assisted with diagnosis). Additionally I have some gut issues that I suspect stem from the very same cause.

    I won't be taking any more antibiotics in a hurry that's for sure, but what are the options for someone such as myself who wants to repair the damage inflicted by ill-advised, long-term antibiotic use?
    Last edited by davem81; 17 February 2021, 06:32 PM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by davem81 View Post
    Basically I'd be grateful to be pointed in the direction of any discussion/advice relating to the thread title (my GP was of little/no help).

    I have spent a cumulative total of probably around 4 years or so on daily oral antibiotics to treat acne/rosacea type issues (also used topicals, but at a much lower frequency). I was even advised at least once by a consultant dermatologist to stay on them permanently, advice I'm glad to say I dismissed.

    I've since to come to realise however that I no longer suffer from my 'original' skin condition, but others that were most likely triggered by various forms of treatment I've employed over the years. For example, my main issue today relates to sebhorreic dermatitis, which my doctor agrees was almost certainly triggered by antibiotic use (it had existed for a long time but flared very significantly during my last course). Additionally I have some gut issues that I suspect stem from the same cause.

    I won't be taking any more antibiotics in a hurry that's for sure, but what are the options for someone such as myself who wants to repair the damage inflicted by ill-advised, long-term antibiotic use?
    I take high dose probiotic 50-100 billion CFU.
    If you have gut issues like diarrhea I would get a stool test which can measure yeast and other things
    Last edited by laser_cat; 8 February 2021, 12:50 AM.

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    • #3
      Antibiotics have been given for rosacea for over fifty years. The side effects, long term effects and risks are well known.

      Treatments to consider:

      Probiotics

      Azelaic Acid

      Immunosuppressants [Topical Calcineurin Inhibitors (TCIs)]

      Ivermectin

      Retinoids

      Sodium Sulfacetamide-sulfur

      Other treatments to consider

      Then there are an enormous number of non prescriptions (over the counter) treatments to consider either here or in the RRDi affiliate store.
      This post should help your gut:

      Do You Have A Gut Feeling About Your Rosacea?
      Last edited by Brady Barrows; 9 February 2021, 02:51 AM.
      Brady Barrows
      Blog - Join the RRDi


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      • #4
        Originally posted by davem81 View Post
        Basically I'd be grateful to be pointed in the direction of any discussion/advice relating to the thread title (my GP was of little/no help).

        I have spent a cumulative total of probably around 4 years or so on daily oral antibiotics to treat acne/rosacea type issues (also used topicals, but at a much lower frequency). I was even advised at least once by a consultant dermatologist to stay on them permanently, advice I'm glad to say I dismissed.

        I've since to come to realise however that I no longer suffer from my 'original' skin condition, but others that were most likely triggered by various forms of treatment I've employed over the years. For example, my main issue today relates to sebhorreic dermatitis, which my doctor agrees was almost certainly triggered by antibiotic use (it had existed for a long time but flared very significantly during my last course). Additionally I have some gut issues that I suspect stem from the same cause.

        I won't be taking any more antibiotics in a hurry that's for sure, but what are the options for someone such as myself who wants to repair the damage inflicted by ill-advised, long-term antibiotic use?
        I don't have specific advice for you as everybody is different, but generally I would focus your research on healing your gut: prebiotics, probiotics, a diet with whole foods and foods that promote the growth of 'good bacteria', limiting sugar intake and processed foods that promote the growth of 'bad bacteria'. Think about your stomach acid too. Long term antibiotic use can inhibit stomach acid production which can result in = low stomach acid = proliferation of 'bad bacteria' in the gut.

        I would also seek out a different dermatologist or rosacea expert to help guide your skin treatment. The reality is that while antibiotics help rosacea symptoms, they are really only papering over the underlying issues and rosacea symptoms will likely start to return once you cease treatment.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Dutch1 View Post
          I don't have specific advice for you as everybody is different, but generally I would focus your research on healing your gut: prebiotics, probiotics, a diet with whole foods and foods that promote the growth of 'good bacteria', limiting sugar intake and processed foods that promote the growth of 'bad bacteria'. Think about your stomach acid too. Long term antibiotic use can inhibit stomach acid production which can result in = low stomach acid = proliferation of 'bad bacteria' in the gut.

          I would also seek out a different dermatologist or rosacea expert to help guide your skin treatment. The reality is that while antibiotics help rosacea symptoms, they are really only papering over the underlying issues and rosacea symptoms will likely start to return once you cease treatment.
          Exactly this! Whole foods that promote good bacteria. I'd also say it's vital to get good quality meat that is pasture-raised and 100% grass-fed, and wild fish. Be careful when something says organic meat, as in the UK, this means that as long as the animal's diet is 51% organic, it can be labelled as organic. Also, wash vegetables and rid them of pesticides, as these can wreak havoc on your microbiome.

          Hope that helps.

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          • #6
            Thank you very much for your replies - I've certainly learnt something. I actually wasn't too bad diet-wise, but there was room for improvement which hopefully I can now go on to achieve.

            Any tips for the skin/face? In terms of when antibiotic use has upset the balance there? I'm using topical anti-fungals on an occasional basis - topicals have caused me such trauma in the past that I simply daren't go too hard at it. I don't suppose there's much more I can do than that...?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by davem81 View Post
              Thank you very much for your replies - I've certainly learnt something. I actually wasn't too bad diet-wise, but there was room for improvement which hopefully I can now go on to achieve.
              Any tips for the skin/face? In terms of when antibiotic use has upset the balance there? I'm using topical anti-fungals on an occasional basis - topicals have caused me such trauma in the past that I simply daren't go too hard at it. I don't suppose there's much more I can do than that...?
              Recommend you read my latest post on Sensitive Skin.
              Brady Barrows
              Blog - Join the RRDi


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