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Efficacy of 1% 4-ethoxybenzaldehyde in reducing facial eryth

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  • Efficacy of 1% 4-ethoxybenzaldehyde in reducing facial eryth

    Dermatol Surg. 2005 Jul;31(7 Pt 2):881-6. Related Articles, Links


    Efficacy of 1% 4-ethoxybenzaldehyde in reducing facial erythema.

    Draelos ZD, Fuller BB.

    Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA. zdraelos@northstate.net

    BACKGROUND: Facial erythema is a common postsurgical and dermatologic problem. It is commonly the result of dermal inflammation arising from either a facial surgical procedure, such as laser resurfacing, dermabrasion, or a face peel, or from an underlying dermatologic condition, such as rosacea. Facial erythema is difficult for the dermatologist to treat in both settings because topical corticosteroids cannot be used long term on the thin facial skin and anti-inflammatory oral or topical antibiotics have associated side effects. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this pilot study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of 1% 4-ethoxybenzaldehyde in a rosacea model of facial erythema. METHODS: Thirty subjects with mild to moderate stable rosacea were enrolled in this 4-week, double-blind, vehicle-controlled study. Photographs, investigator assessment, and subject assessment were the efficacy criteria. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant reduction in facial erythema (p<.01) in those subjects who used the active for 4 weeks, as well as a statistically significant improvement in uneven skin tone (p<.01) and the overall severity of the disease (p<.01). There was no statistically significant difference in any of these three indices in the vehicle-treated group. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that benzaldehyde-derived anti-inflammatory agents may be useful in reducing facial erythema in a rosacea model.

    PMID: 16029682 [PubMed - in process]

  • #2
    Hi all,
    In studies that we post here, we see the term, "clinical significance" used in every study to give the viewer an idea of how true, or "valid" the study was. This is important, because if the study was designed poorly, then the results mean nothing. The "P value" helps to determine whether the results were meaningful, or statistically valid.
    For example in the above study... the results can be read as such: "If there was no correlation between the administration of the benzaldehyde and the improved skin tone...then the results that were seen should only be seen less than 5 percent (P = .05) of the time." In other words...if the medicine DID NOT work...then those results would NOT be seen 95 percent of the time. The fact that they WERE seen, means that there is almost definitely a connection between the medicine and the results (decreased redness).
    Again, the "P (probability) value" is given in every study. For the study to mean anything, it should alway be less than 5 percent (.05). Think about it.
    Hope this clears up any confusion (if there was any confusion).
    Perry

    Comment


    • #3
      Interesting stuff Perry. Thanks!

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      • #4
        No problem, Bob!
        That'll be $5.00, please! :mrgreen:
        Perry

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        • #5
          What that, about £0.00005. Bargain, I'll take two!

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          • #6
            What is 4-ethoxybenzaldehyde ?

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            • #7
              This is the Cutanix ingredient right? Can't find the thread with the post I'm thinking of that mentioned the results of this study.

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              • #8
                4-ethoxybenzaldehyde = quadrinone, which is the active in Cutanix products. Brian

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                • #9
                  Product Search

                  I used Cutanix and loved it. I believe 4-ethoxybenzaldehyde works! Since Cutanix is no longer available, does anybody know of another product that uses it?

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                  • #10
                    You can get it from www.skinactives.com and can mix it into whatever cream/lotion you like. I think it does help especially with seb derm redness.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by MomGus View Post
                      I used Cutanix and loved it. I believe 4-ethoxybenzaldehyde works! Since Cutanix is no longer available, does anybody know of another product that uses it?
                      I really wish I knew about Cutanix products for rosacea when they were available. I know they had some problems with the FDA, but does anyone have any idea if they will make a comeback?
                      "Tomorrow the sun will rise. Who knows what the tide could bring?"

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                      • #12
                        In the writeup it says

                        ----
                        It has been shown that topical application of this active at a 1% concentration improved uneven skin tone and the severaity of rosacea. Use in conjunction with niacinamide for best results.
                        ----

                        I'm surprised to read niacinamide is a good idea - I thought this would make flushing worse?

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                        • #13
                          Niacin is bad for flushing but as niacinamide it helps..

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                          • #14
                            thanks for the link to skin actives i have not visited in so long it is useful to know where to get the active.

                            but is it as simple as mixing a 1% in any cream? surely the medium and delivery mechanisms will be important to consider, and is it possible certain ingredients can degrade the active?

                            i can always email hannah at SA but her views are quite biased and always optimistic of any product on the website.

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                            • #15
                              Thats a great idea....if you get a answer please post the info for us all....I would love to try out this active myself.
                              Dx 1998

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