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Mirvaso has been approved by the FDA.

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  • Originally posted by nat007 View Post
    No, on Davids page he made a selection of reviews himself and posted them in his main post.


    "Alfypet says:

    I tried my Mirvaso today for the first time. I applied about 45 minutes ago. The good news is that I have not reacted badly thus far. I am so used to applying a topical and immediately getting red and flushy, so that is a big plus for me.
    The area on which I applied the cream has definitely paled. Surprisingly, this does not necessarily make me look better.
    .
    and then;

    The good news is that I have used it for three days now and have seen no ill effects. That is huge for me, as I usually react to everything! I can’t use Metrogel, Finacea, Promiseb, Xylogel, etc, without reacting with redness or flushing.
    The Mirvaso definitely helps with diffuse redness, and I think a lot of people will have great results. Under my redness, I have visible vessels, which I was hoping would not be visible with Mirvaso. But for me, they are still visible, and no longer hidden by the redness of my overall rosacea. Honestly, had I never had laser treatment and Veinwave, which made these veins more visible, I think I’d have much better results.
    I do feel, however, that applying Mirvaso takes down my rosacea, in general, a degree or two. My face feels calmer and less reactive so far. I am at work today, which will be a good test. I usually flush on a daily basis at work at around 6/7 pm. I’m not sure why, but it is probably anxiety trying to finish my deadlines and get out of the office. I’ll see if that happens today."
    Mirvaso is so new that only a few rosacea sufferers have been able to try it. What are your chances of having a bad reaction ? How are users in the real world faring, and will the general populatio…


    No more updates from Alfypet added by David.

    Then below his post people can comment and she didn't btw. But well, I guess we know her outcome anyway. Curious if adding Benadryl lotion to Mirvaso is really helpful to combat rebound flushing, as some people commented below the post?
    Oh yes, I see. Well again, probably just an oversight. It really should be up dated.

    Comment


    • Still working

      Not really anything new to add, but still positive with Mirvaso. It's been...2 months now? I lost track. I've refilled twice now, not because I need more, but because I want to stock up while the savings card is still valid (expires end of December).

      Currently I've been off of it for 5 days, because someone asked me to try that and see if I got some weird reaction. Nada. My skin is just back to its normal rosacea redness when I'm not it. So I'm going to start using it in the morning again since I miss having paler skin.

      I should note I am not taking other rosacea meds to confound the results. No beta blockers, antibiotics, antidepressants, antihistamines, etc. I cleanse and moisturize my skin once a day with CeraVe cleanser and hydrating lotion.

      Just to say it again, it helps decrease my state of permanent redness. It doesn't prevent flushing from my normal triggers (exercise, strange end of day flush at 5-7 pm, changes in temperature, and a few other things). But my flushing subsides a little quicker if I'm wearing Mirvaso that day.

      I would like to "cure" this rosacea madness internally (instead of applying a quick fix cream), but having run that gamut on prescription and non-prescription stuff, I've just lost hope on that front for now.
      Last edited by GreenGables; 22 November 2013, 07:33 PM.

      Comment


      • GreenGables,

        Thanks very much for reporting your results. As far as I know, you are the only who has reported consistently positive results. Please let us know if this continues. Glad that there are some people that can use this as prescribed.

        Comment


        • Re: Oracea for papules and pustules only

          Originally posted by maskielli View Post
          I cant remember the exact science but it works by acting on a receptor that when affected constricts the blood vessels, unlike oracea and metrogel which are more for paustules and pauples
          Hi there,
          I would like to point out that as a very long-term sufferer of Rosacea with chronic redness and flushing, the ORacea has worked for me VERY WELL, with almost permanent clearing of any inflammation and/or redness caused by Seborrheic dermatitis and vascular Rosacea. I only get red now with hard work and exertion, or during the summer with low humidity!

          I only need a V-beam laser treatment about 1-2 times a year now! I used to have to go every 1-2 months.

          Comment


          • I am still curious if any users in this thread has tried mixing with Benadryl. As previously mentioned, I have now noticed 4-5 accounts on other forums that it has prevented rebound flushing, although am concerned with the accuracy of the reports.

            Comment


            • My thought is that if you experience rebound flushing, maybe you shouldn't be trying to cover it up? Maybe you should listen to your face.

              I have heard the same about steroids and Mirvaso. Sure, for a time this may work (same for benadryl). But are you just masking things and inviting a massive rebound at a later date? If you already established you are prone to rebounds, I would fear you are only delaying the inevitable. Seems risky.

              Here is a question. We all knew rebounds were an issue long before Galderma released Mirvaso. If something as simple as benedryl worked, why didn't Galderma add it? Why didn't Galderma find anything to counteract the rebounds? Forget what the studies say, we know the truth that rebounds occur to nearly everyone. Perhaps they couldn't find anything because it does not exist in a safe manner. Perhaps rebounds are just a fundamental problem when you force the vessels to constrict.

              Another thought:
              - Vessels/skin tissue is healed and in a better state. Vessels constrict naturally and no rebounds occur.
              - Vessels are forced to constrict. No fundamental positive change occurs (Mirvaso). When worn off, things are worse. Happens with steroids, nasal vasoconstrictors, and probably Mirvaso. I think it is just another way to temporarily reduce redness but cause problems long term.

              Comment


              • They did not add anything because they did not need to. Mirvaso preformed well in the trials without anything added. There is no proof that these reportings of rebound are anything else then allergic reactions.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Makron View Post
                  They did not add anything because they did not need to. Mirvaso preformed well in the trials without anything added. There is no proof that these reportings of rebound are anything else then allergic reactions.
                  There is no proof that they are allergic reactions.

                  Comment


                  • If you on the other hand have trouble when using Mirvaso then you should stop using it and not use Benadryl or anything else to negate whatever adverse effect you have while you continue using it. STOP EXPERIMENTING with yourselves. Do you even need to be told that, it is common sense.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Makron View Post
                      If you on the other hand have trouble when using Mirvaso then you should stop using it and not use Benadryl or anything else to negate whatever adverse effect you have while you continue using it. STOP EXPERIMENTING with yourselves. Do you even need to be told that, it is common sense.
                      Immediately stop using it.

                      What's being questioned is the "experimental" phase and if it's been reported authentically. When one is "following" doctors instructions it's fair to assume the experimenting part is over. I do so bristle at blaming the "victim" tactics.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Starlite View Post
                        There is no proof that they are allergic reactions.

                        There where no signs of such massive problems with rebound flushing in the long term trials or short term trials. So either there is a major cover up conspiracy by both Galderma and the FDA or they are allergic reactions. Ockhams razor says that the simplest solution is most often the right one so I think allergy is the logical thing to conclude.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Makron View Post
                          There where no signs of such massive problems with rebound flushing in the long term trials or short term trials. So either there is a major cover up conspiracy by both Galderma and the FDA or they are allergic reactions. Ockhams razor says that the simplest solution is most often the right one so I think allergy is the logical thing to conclude.
                          Mu - "un-ask the question, indicate the question is fundamentally flawed, or reject the premise that a dualistic answer can or will be given"

                          Skin Allergy Symptoms & Diagnosis

                          Itching, redness and swelling are common to most skin allergies. Yet there are some differences that help in the diagnosis of specific conditions. Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema)
                          Symptoms: Itchy, red or dry skin. It may “weep” or leak fluid that crusts over when scratched, which means that it is also infected. Urticaria (Hives) and Angioedema
                          Symptoms: Urticaria is itchy, red and white raised bumps or welts that range in size and can appear anywhere on the body. Angioedema often appears on the face around the eyes, cheeks or lips. This deeper layer of swelling can also occur on hands, feet, genitals, or inside the bowels or throat. In acute urticaria, the welts disappear within minutes to a few weeks. Chronic hives last for months or even years. If the cause of your hives can be identified, you can manage the condition by avoiding that trigger. Treating hives or angioedema is often successful with oral antihistamines that control the itch and recurrence of the rash. If the rash is not controlled with a standard dose of the antihistamine, your doctor may suggest increasing the dose for better control of your symptoms. If antihistamines do not control the rash, or if it leaves bruises, then it is important that your doctor rules out other causes which may need alternative therapies.
                          Frostbite symptoms

                          Frostnip. The first stage of frostbite is frostnip — a mild form of frostbite in which your skin turns red and feels very cold. Continued exposure leads to prickling and numbness in the affected area. As your skin warms, you may feel pain and tingling. Frostnip doesn't permanently damage the skin.
                          Superficial frostbite. The second stage of frostbite appears as reddened skin that turns white or very pale. The skin may remain soft, but some ice crystals may form in the tissue. Your skin may begin to feel deceptively warm — a sign of serious skin involvement. If you treat frostbite at this stage, the surface of your skin may appear mottled, blue or purple as it's warmed or thawed. With warming, you may notice stinging, burning and swelling. A fluid-filled blister may appear 24 to 36 hours after rewarming the skin. Signs and symptoms of superficial or severe frostbite — such as white or pale skin, loss of all sensation in the affected area, or blisters Increased pain, swelling, redness or discharge in the area that was frostbitten
                          Ischemia

                          In medicine, ischemia, also spelled as ischaemia or ischæmia, (/ɪˈskiːmɪə/;[1][2][a]) is a restriction in blood supply to tissues, causing a shortage of oxygen and glucose needed for cellular metabolism (to keep tissue alive).[3] Ischemia is generally caused by problems with blood vessels, with resultant damage to or dysfunction of tissue. It also means local anemia in a given part of a body sometimes resulting from congestion (such as vasoconstriction, thrombosis or embolism).

                          Ischemia results in tissue damage in a process known as ischemic cascade. The damage is the result of the build-up of metabolic waste products, inability to maintain cell membranes, mitochondrial damage, and eventual leakage of autolyzing proteolytic enzymes into the cell and surrounding tissues.

                          Restoration of blood supply to ischemic tissues can cause additional damage known as reperfusion injury that can be more damaging than the initial ischemia. Reintroduction of blood flow brings oxygen back to the tissues, causing a greater production of free radicals and reactive oxygen species that damage cells. It also brings more calcium ions to the tissues causing further calcium overloading and can result in potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmias and also accelerates cellular self-destruction. The restored blood flow also exaggerates the inflammation response of damaged tissues, causing white blood cells to destroy damaged cells that may otherwise still be viable.
                          The "conclusion" is only guess work because neither you or I have seen any of the people reporting here. However the list of symptoms fits "Ischemia" best, but not perfectly.

                          Comment


                          • Are you serious. Ischemia is caused by trauma or by a blood cloth and sometimes by inherited disese and under no circumstances does Brimonidine cause Ischemia. If it did it would probably not have been approved and also Alphagan would have caused Ischemia. Im not even going to discuss frostbite. Why did you even bring up frostbite

                            Brimonidine is even used to combat Ischemia: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11950228

                            25 % in the brimonodine study reported allergic reactions. People using Mirvaso where reporting flushing far more then the trials suggested. The trials did not involve people that where allergic so its safe to assume that the general population will have more problems then the people involved in the trials due to allergy. This is why I claimed that allergy was a plausable reason for the many negative reports. The allergy claim is based on sound reasoning. It is the best and simplest explanation for the difference in user reports and the FDA trials.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Makron View Post
                              Are you serious. Ischemia is caused by trauma or by a blood cloth and sometimes by inherited disese and under no circumstances does Brimonidine cause Ischemia. If it did it would probably not have been approved and also Alphagan would have caused Ischemia. Im not even going to discuss frostbite. Why did you even bring up frostbite

                              Brimonidine is even used to combat Ischemia: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11950228

                              25 % in the brimonodine study reported allergic reactions. People using Mirvaso where reporting flushing far more then the trials suggested. The trials did not involve people that where allergic so its safe to assume that the general population will have more problems then the people involved in the trials due to allergy. This is why I claimed that allergy was a plausable reason for the many negative reports. The allergy claim is based on sound reasoning. It is the best and simplest explanation for the difference in user reports and the FDA trials.
                              I am very serious. "Ischemia" is simply the descriptor for loss of proper circulation to tissue causing a shortage of oxygen and glucose needed for cellular metabolism. It is not a word used to describe the cause of the circulation loss. Your study link is very interesting in that brimonodine was used in small doses to prevent the the damage clearly described "as reperfusion injury" on the optic nerve after circulation returned. It is only the abstract though. I would love to see the whole study.

                              No one is describing "allergy" like symptoms here on this forum but what they do describe does fit symptoms of frost bite like injuries or other ischemic like injuries. They report cold sensations, extreme blanching of the treated areas, and "rebound" flushing. The worst cases even report a sloughing off of dead tissue as they recovered from the use of the medication. The Mirvaso is intended to affect the redness of the skin. If it is achieving this goal by shutting down vascular supply to the face, it will cause damage.

                              If applying Benadryl helps this issue it maybe because as described, "The restored blood flow also exaggerates the inflammation response of damaged tissues, causing white blood cells to destroy damaged cells that may otherwise still be viable." This is also found in an allergic reaction. As you and wiry both mentioned, it would not be wise to cover up those symptoms because it may just be hiding damage that is occurring.

                              So to me the big question is, does Mirvaso work by shutting down vascular supply to the skin it is applied to?

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Makron View Post
                                There where no signs of such massive problems with rebound flushing in the long term trials or short term trials. So either there is a major cover up conspiracy by both Galderma and the FDA or they are allergic reactions. Ockhams razor says that the simplest solution is most often the right one so I think allergy is the logical thing to conclude.
                                Do this math for users who report real experiences (not just numbers):

                                1 person a positive experience for an extended period of time.
                                30+ people with negative experiences.

                                That is so out of whack that it is impossible to ignore. By your logic, this sort of thing does not happen with FDA approved drugs. That is very naive.

                                Meh, it doesn't matter. Either way, if real users are having real problems it will all sort itself out in the end.

                                Comment

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