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  • LED Choices

    With many products to choose from, I need some help.

    First, should we get red only?

    I was looking at this one and while its more expensive than others, I dont mind to pay for the ease of use. Would this fit my needs?

    http://www.acnelamp.com/product.php?id=1002

    As far as size goes,this may be smaller...but if it works I can always upgrade and it is money well spent.

    From their website I found this in the FAQ...I am certainly light sensitive.

    7. Will I Get a Sunburn or Skin Cancer?
    The peak wavelengths of light used in the Acnelamp are outside those that may cause damage to the skin. Persons hypersensitive to any amount of light should not use this product.

  • #2
    Re: LED Choices

    Originally posted by hozer2k
    Persons hypersensitive to any amount of light should not use this product.
    This is very important and applies to both the fluorescent and LED models.

    --

    You can find units that are all blue, all red, blue + red, and red + near infrared. Loosely speaking, blue is for acne, the red is for inflammation and the near infrared penetrates deeper into the tissue than the red.

    My face skin type is dry and I'm very prone to flushing with minor P+P and lots of telangiectasia. I do not have acne and because the P+P and acne are so different so I didn’t consider the blue for my skin.

    I know that Peter, who uses the Dermalux, started with a Blue + Red unit but eventually switched to all red.

    I have read posts here by members that have used the Red+Near-Infrared and have been very pleased with the results.

    I use the 660nm (red) on my face. I do not use the pulsing, I tried the pulsing option twice on my face and didn’t like, I can’t really explain why. Maybe I’ll try it again in the future.

    I have the red+near-infrared panels but have not tried it yet. I’m going one step at a time.

    --

    LINKS to sellers some consumer, some professional:


    And, there’s always eBay

    --

    LINKS to information about LED therapy in general:

    Happiness is a choice.

    Comment


    • #3
      Generally speaking, is the efficacy of the products the same and its just a matter of convience at that point?

      If that is the case, would a smaller cost effective unit be a good choice to see if you respond well? This is my thought, but I want to make sure its still a good unit.

      THe $250 acne lamp seems easy to use and priced a little high, but still reasonable considering I spent $2500 on my recent IPL treatments.

      P.S. I meant sunlight...I dont have a problem with articficial light, so maybe its OK.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by hozer2k
        If that is the case, would a smaller cost effective unit be a good choice to see if you respond well? This is my thought, but I want to make sure its still a good unit.
        That would be my thought too. Red light is red light is red light (within reason).

        I would only add that you might want to ensure that the device or approach you choose enables you to bathe your face in light without undue difficulty. Holding some lumpy array about the face for a quarter of an hour or so is enough to render a fellow red-faced with impatience.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by hozer2k
          P.S. I meant sunlight...I dont have a problem with articficial light, so maybe its OK.
          I got that. But, it's an important caution to folks that are sensitive to light, whether it be sunlight, flourescent lights, or what have you. These units are not suitable for those people.

          Originally posted by hozer2k
          Generally speaking, is the efficacy of the products the same and its just a matter of convience at that point?

          If that is the case, would a smaller cost effective unit be a good choice to see if you respond well? This is my thought, but I want to make sure its still a good unit.

          THe $250 acne lamp seems easy to use and priced a little high, but still reasonable considering I spent $2500 on my recent IPL treatments.
          I can't really comment from experience because I bought such a monster right out of the gate so I don't know what it's like to do smaller areas. But from the PMs and posts I've read it seems that folks are happy with the smaller units. The complaint being time and tediousness of application. This is why some who start with the acnelamp one head unit eventually buy the three head version.

          Some posters have compained that the $250 was very expensive and it didn't work for them. It is a lot of money, and you have put it into perspective with regards to cash outlay for other treatments. My comment on the ones that have said it didn't work is that I noted they didn't use it for very long and they didn't use it consistently.

          This investment is two-fold: time + money.

          I hope that helps.

          Twickle Purple

          Happiness is a choice.

          Comment


          • #6
            Ultimately if the RLT works...then the price for a larger unit is not a big deal. But it seems logical to test it out with a minimal investment in case it turns out to be a dud or you have a reaction. In fact, I think its better in other aspects as well. I will use it on just one side of the face so that I can compare it to the untreated side.

            Arent a lot of people with rosacea light sensitive? So this seems to be somewhat contradictory to our condition.

            In any case, I am going to keep my fingers crossed.

            Comment


            • #7
              great post twickle.

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks fut there's enough there to keep us all reading for a good while!

                Originally posted by hozer2k
                Arent a lot of people with rosacea light sensitive? So this seems to be somewhat contradictory to our condition.
                I believe so. I know that I am very light sensitive, to sunlight. I feel scorched by the slightest exposure and it was made worse by the Doxycyline.

                Light is full spectrum, the therapy we are discussing are with individual spectrums.

                Red and Near Infrared have no UV. I believe that this is what most people are sensitive to. The caution that I repeated was for the folks who have immunological conditions causing photosensitivity.

                Happiness is a choice.

                Comment


                • #9
                  TP: Since you seem pretty familiar with the products and want something right out of the box like me...would you think the all red single acne lamp is a good choice for what I want to do then?

                  If this does even half of what the claims are (heck even a quarter) then it would be worth it to me. I am surprised we dont have more people trying it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I think a lot of folks use it, they just aren't here on this forum. I can't really make a recommendation, I can just share everything I know, or if you lived on Vancouver Island, I could let you use my machine to see how it works for you.

                    I think there are 3 things to consider when purchasing a unit: spectrum, convenience, cost/value

                    SPECTRUM

                    Decide which spectrum is best suited to your needs.

                    CONVENIENCE

                    Consider your sessions and how, where and when you will be using the unit. At night, in bed, a hand held unit can rest on your pillow and you can position your head and face according to the area you want coverage. If you want to use it during the day, let's say when you are at your desk or in front your computer, then the unit with a stand is best because you can just position it and keep focused on your tasks at hand (as long as you stay still.) I've set my units up in a room with a table that I lay on during my sessions. I make the room very dark so the light is focused and I get no other spectrum interference.

                    COST/VALUE

                    How many lights can you afford? Which unit gives you the most lights/output/dose for your money and still meets your other criteria?

                    --

                    I hope all this helps. Sorry for not answering your question directly.

                    Twickle Purple

                    Happiness is a choice.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      There's a couple LED threads going on. I've posted this in the other but will include it here as well.

                      --

                      Here's a link to the PDF of an article, parts of it I've copies in below

                      New Uses Emerge for
                      Light-Emitting Diode Technology


                      LED therapy is effective, non-invasive, painless, free of side
                      effects, easy to apply, and well tolerated by all ages and
                      all types of patients,” Dr. Calderhead said. “I think that
                      LED therapy is the medicine of the new millennium.”
                      ---

                      The scientific literature demonstrates that infrared light penetrates tissue more effectively than visible light,” Dr. Calderhead added. “Intensity is also important, and LEDs are ideal in this regard. LED therapy is effective, non-invasive, painless, free of side effects, easy to apply, and well tolerated by all ages and all types of patients,” Dr. Calderhead said. “I think that LED therapy is the medicine of the new millennium.”

                      ...

                      Alternating red (633 nm) and blue LED light (415 nm) in a series of eight sessions shows promising results in the treatment of mild to severe acne, according to Tony Chu, M.D., consultant dermatologist, substituting presenter for Bruce Russell, M.D. “Dr. Russell showed that LED red-blue therapy gave significantly better results than blue light, oral antibiotics, and topical therapy,” Dr. Chu said. “Results with the LED included 81% reduction in lesion count at 12 weeks and marked reduction in pore size, with no damage to the sebaceous gland.” Dr. Chu is head of dermatology at Hammersmith Hospital in London. According to Dr. Chu, Propionibacterium acnes absorbs blue light, which reacts with intracellular coproporphyrin III to produce singlet oxygen which destroys only bacteria and not the surrounding tissue. “The rationale behind using red and blue light is that red light has been used for many years to accelerate healing in chronic leg ulcers and non-healing lesions,” Dr. Chu said. “It is thought to have an anti-inflammatory effect and to work via cytokine induction.” How red and blue light is used alternately reduces sebum excretion and post treatment flare-up needs to be further investigated, he added.

                      ...

                      “Initial clinical results suggest that the Omnilux LED system from PhotoTherapeutics, Inc. (Lake Forest, Calif., and Manchester, U.K.) will have a pivotal role in pain management,” according to R. Glen Calderhead, M.Sc., Ph.D., F.R.S.M. “Studies show that the pain transmission process can be attenuated by phototherapy,” said Dr. Calderhead. “The 830 nm light activates production of endorphins and blocks pain transmitting chemicals, causing non-narcotic analgesia. Recent studies have proven the efficacy of this wavelength in the management of sports and muscle injuries.

                      Happiness is a choice.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Where I have used Spectrum previously, substitute Wavelength, and you'll have it right ;)

                        Photorejuvenation and Light Wavelengths



                        White light or day light is made up of a spectrum of various waves of light. These waves are visible and invisible, ranging from violet and blue to red and infrared.

                        The waves are described in nanometers (nm) such at 450 nanometers blue or 750 nanometers infrared.

                        RED and INFRARED - The power of red/infrared LED devices is largely limited to current LED technology. Devices with LED's in the 625-630 nm range are inherently brighter than LED's in the 650-680 nm range.

                        VIOLET/BLUE/GREEN - These wavelengths are now used in the treatment of acne. Clinical trials have show conclusively that the action of blue/green light kills P. acne bacteria.

                        YELLOW/AMBER - Several manufacturers have elected to offer light wands in these wavelengths as an alternative to red/infrared or other skin related conditions (improving lymphatic drainage).

                        Happiness is a choice.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Interesting...far as I know Dr. Chu is a well respected doctor. I have heard a lot about him over the last several years.

                          Has anyone investigated the blue light? Is that OK for rosacea?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I was told that the blue light can aggravate Rosacea by the fellow at Dermalux. It turns out that may not be the case though. I have read here of one user (fut) that uses it and finds it beneficial, and not aggravating at all.

                            A 'net search will likely give you more details on that.

                            Peter has posted that Dr. Chu is planning on conducting a study with RLT. Check out his thread: Red Light Clinical Trial at Hammersmith Hospital

                            Happiness is a choice.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              thread hijacking 8) Been using red light for a month and a half, 30-45 mins daily, very close to the panels...

                              Seems to work!

                              I'm still red but all my symptoms are reduced and I don't flush as easily, not sure how much more room for improvement there is tho... I was worried at first that being too close would make things worse (it seemed to be the case as I had small patches that became redder but eventually they settle down). After 45 mins the leds are only slightly warm plus I use a fan. It's really annoying to use tho... have to lay down on the floor without being able to do much. but another plus is that I'm also considering dropping clonidine!

                              I had 10 IPLs sessions last year, no doubt that this is by far the quickest way to improve one's redness, but flushing persists... plus it's a freaking pain and bloody expensive too.

                              No idea if RLT can help you if you're severely red but with IPL it's a killer combo. I wish I'd known about it when I was doing IPL.

                              So where did I get mine ? from IowaDavid... I can't thank you enough man, without your reports on your own experience I wouldn't have bothered with it...
                              It's not exactly a professionally build unit and I had to solder a few bits several times but the price was fair... you could setup a business if you improved the finishing , props to you!
                              ------ Current routine ------
                              cetaphil sensitive skin cleanser, linacare moisturizer, red light(660nm), 2 lemons, jojoba oil, IPL(10), AFT(9)

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