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    antwantsclear
    Senior Member

  • antwantsclear
    replied
    Originally posted by Dutch1 View Post
    Did you find it helped your rosacea symptoms? I take it it wasn't a silver bullet like in Duff Man's case...
    It was a game changer in terms of the flushing side of rosacea for me. It is an anti-parasitic and I suspect it may well have a role in managing demodex mites although this is a totally unproven claim! I certainly wouldn't want to stop taking it, so definitely worthwhile considering in my opinion for type 1/redness/flushing rosacea, especially of the ears which can be a particularly intense part of the face in terms of flushing.

    Leave a comment:

  • Dutch1
    Senior Member

  • Dutch1
    replied
    Originally posted by antwantsclear View Post
    I can remember a number of positive posts when I first took hydroxychloroquine in 2011. It is used more regularly to treat lupus of the skin (which can have a similar butterfly rash to rosacea). I actually approached a dermatologist who specialised in lupus to try it as I assumed she'd be familiar with how it worked and would be willing to try it perhaps - Dr Justine Hextall. I had tried mepacrine first, another anti-malarial which was recorded in a 1950s British Journal of Dermatology article as being used for rosacea. The combination of hydroxychloroquine and mepacrine can be quite powerful (it is a combination used in difficult cases of lupus skin rashes), but mepacrine has regular gastro issues, which is one of the reasons it's not used very much anymore (very hard to get in the US I think).

    https://www.lupus.org.uk/how-is-lupus-treated (nb: towards the bottom the information on the combination therapy of mepacrine and hydroxychloroquine - I have used this combination in the past and I think it is quite powerful)

    The licence for the brand, Plaquenil, has ended in the UK, so it is now referred to as hydroxychloroquine alone, though I think it's still sold as Plaquenil in some countries. Nevertheless the formulations of different generic brands are quite different, and I only like the Zentiva brand of hydroxychloroquine (which is an exact copy of the original Plaquenil). There are a lot of complaints about intolerance to the coatings of some of the generic versions.
    Did you find it helped your rosacea symptoms? I take it it wasn't a silver bullet like in Duff Man's case...

    Leave a comment:

  • Jamoverton
    Senior Member

  • Jamoverton
    replied
    I've seen hydroxychloroquine/Plaquenil mentioned on here several times. It is also mentioned in this article: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3692271/

    I've tried to search for it on this site but unfortunately the search function on here is awful and often won't return any results, though I know they're on here.

    Leave a comment:

  • antwantsclear
    Senior Member

  • antwantsclear
    replied
    Originally posted by Brady Barrows View Post
    The links explain Hydroxychloroquine is a malaria treatment that has been used to also treat lupus. It was shown effective in an "8-week HCQ treatment [that] exerted satisfactory therapeutic effects on erythema and inflammatory lesions of rosacea patients, indicating that it is a promising drug for rosacea in clinical treatment." This is so new we have few anecdotal reports other than the one in this thread by Duff Man. Maybe if you dig around we might find some other anecdotal reports of using Plaquenil for rosacea. I am sure we will be hearing more reports as rosaceans cite this paper to their dermatologist and ask for a prescription. I found this thread started by wendykay but no one reports using it. It takes a lot of investigation and lots of searching to weed through posts mentioning Plaquenil. If there were a number of positive reports like Duff Man's we would know about it. And Duff Man only posted this one post and we never hear from him again. This is typical and not unusual. The rosaceans come and go posting their rosacea woes, sometimes their remission, and after their posts they have finished their mission.
    I can remember a number of positive posts when I first took hydroxychloroquine in 2011. It is used more regularly to treat lupus of the skin (which can have a similar butterfly rash to rosacea). I actually approached a dermatologist who specialised in lupus to try it as I assumed she'd be familiar with how it worked and would be willing to try it perhaps - Dr Justine Hextall. I had tried mepacrine first, another anti-malarial which was recorded in a 1950s British Journal of Dermatology article as being used for rosacea. The combination of hydroxychloroquine and mepacrine can be quite powerful (it is a combination used in difficult cases of lupus skin rashes), but mepacrine has regular gastro issues, which is one of the reasons it's not used very much anymore (very hard to get in the US I think).

    https://www.lupus.org.uk/how-is-lupus-treated (nb: towards the bottom the information on the combination therapy of mepacrine and hydroxychloroquine - I have used this combination in the past and I think it is quite powerful)

    The licence for the brand, Plaquenil, has ended in the UK, so it is now referred to as hydroxychloroquine alone, though I think it's still sold as Plaquenil in some countries. Nevertheless the formulations of different generic brands are quite different, and I only like the Zentiva brand of hydroxychloroquine (which is an exact copy of the original Plaquenil). There are a lot of complaints about intolerance to the coatings of some of the generic versions.
    antwantsclear
    Senior Member
    Last edited by antwantsclear; 12 January 2020, 04:11 PM.

    Leave a comment:

  • Brady Barrows
    Senior Member

  • Brady Barrows
    replied
    Originally posted by Dutch1 View Post
    Found this thread here, where three users discuss their experiences with plaquenil. It seemed to help their symptoms. I'm sure there are others threads floating around too.
    Thanks. There are few like you left among rosaceans here at RF with the chutzpah to take the time to investigate and find such threads. Obviously trying plaquenil died off around 2011 but I think it wil be revived in 2020 and we shall see if it has the Duff Man success rate.

    Leave a comment:

  • Dutch1
    Senior Member

  • Dutch1
    replied
    Originally posted by Brady Barrows View Post
    This is so new we have few anecdotal reports other than the one in this thread by Duff Man. Maybe if you dig around we might find some other anecdotal reports of using Plaquenil for rosacea. I am sure we will be hearing more reports as rosaceans.
    Found this thread here, where three users discuss their experiences with plaquenil. It seemed to help their symptoms. I'm sure there are others threads floating around too.

    Leave a comment:

  • Brady Barrows
    Senior Member

  • Brady Barrows
    replied
    Originally posted by Rubydo1 View Post
    Is it an antibiotic? And what’s the side effects ? Have you tried it ?
    The links explain Hydroxychloroquine is a malaria treatment that has been used to also treat lupus. It was shown effective in an "8-week HCQ treatment [that] exerted satisfactory therapeutic effects on erythema and inflammatory lesions of rosacea patients, indicating that it is a promising drug for rosacea in clinical treatment." This is so new we have few anecdotal reports other than the one in this thread by Duff Man. Maybe if you dig around we might find some other anecdotal reports of using Plaquenil for rosacea. I am sure we will be hearing more reports as rosaceans cite this paper to their dermatologist and ask for a prescription. I found this thread started by wendykay but no one reports using it. It takes a lot of investigation and lots of searching to weed through posts mentioning Plaquenil. If there were a number of positive reports like Duff Man's we would know about it. And Duff Man only posted this one post and we never hear from him again. This is typical and not unusual. The rosaceans come and go posting their rosacea woes, sometimes their remission, and after their posts they have finished their mission.
    Brady Barrows
    Senior Member
    Last edited by Brady Barrows; 12 January 2020, 03:55 AM.

    Leave a comment:

  • Dutch1
    Senior Member

  • Dutch1
    replied
    Originally posted by Brady Barrows View Post
    A recent paper has confirmed what Duff Man explains above three years ago that works for rosacea. We will without a doubt hear more about this from others. Plaquenil (Hydroxychloroquine) is available in a generic prescription and available worldwide.
    This is exciting! It's great that it's an already widely available medication and we won't have to wait years to hear some anecdotal evidence.

    Leave a comment:

  • opare
    Senior Member

  • opare
    replied
    People taking 400 mg of hydroxychloroquine or less per day generally have a negligible risk of macular toxicity, according to Wikipedia

    how much do Rosacea patients take?

    Leave a comment:

  • Rubydo1
    Senior Member

  • Rubydo1
    replied
    Originally posted by Brady Barrows View Post
    A recent paper has confirmed what Duff Man explains above three years ago that works for rosacea. We will without a doubt hear more about this from others. Plaquenil (Hydroxychloroquine) is available in a generic prescription and available worldwide.
    Is it an antibiotic? And what’s the side effects ? Have you tried it ?

    Leave a comment:

  • Brady Barrows
    Senior Member

  • Brady Barrows
    replied
    Originally posted by Duff Man View Post
    I tried every cream imaginable; the list of creams I didn't try is shorter. I went for 13 years without a full remission; started getting the rash really bad when I was a handsome young man, and it really was tough on my self esteem. It did a number on my face, and began to cover my scalp too.

    The only thing that finally worked for me with long lasting, real remission, is plaquenil. My only regret is that I didn't try it sooner. Much, much sooner.

    In hindsight, I think it was likely lupus all along, and my experience really has me questioning how many other people with "rosaceae" are just lupus sufferers.

    I would encourage folks here to do an honest self audit to reconcile any symptoms that may be similar to lupus and connect the dots. And whatever you do, whatever your gut tells you, please don't give up on finding a lasting resolution.

    Even if I don't have lupus, the treatment for it resolved my horrible, red, burning, painful, embarrassing rash. I don't really care what we call it because I'm able to look in the mirror again. And Im feeling​ my age again.

    I hope everyone here finds a lasting remission. Don't stop until you do.
    A recent paper has confirmed what Duff Man explains above three years ago that works for rosacea. We will without a doubt hear more about this from others. Plaquenil (Hydroxychloroquine) is available in a generic prescription and available worldwide.

    Leave a comment:

  • amcfarland41
    Junior Member

  • amcfarland41
    replied
    How I cured my Rosacea

    Hey everyone,

    I have been struggling with Rosacea for many years now, but have finally found relief. After buying countless products and loading up my face with oils and moisturizers, I realized this was just a band-aid on top of the underlying problem. Since learning about how important the gut is in our skins appearance, I have made some changes to my diet and lifestyle. After changing what I eat on a daily basis and applying less product to my face, my skin conditions have completely gone away. A book that I think everyone needs to read is written by a doctor who has been studying the role of bacteria in our stomachs his whole life. He talks about how to kill off the bad bacteria in our stomachs and allow the good strains to flourish. It also addresses exactly what to eat and when to eat it. A product that I use alongside the books knowledge is a type of water called "Rose Water". This is the only thing I put on my face now and it is completely natural. Most importantly, it has one ingredient. It allows your face to breathe and remain cool when you would usually get hot. Also, it is a great value, as it will last you for a year. Instead of spending your hard earned money on various products that promise to treat your Rosacea, I urge you to educate yourself from this book and try out the Rose Water. The links to the products are linked below. It'll be the best, and hopefully last, investment you have to make.

    https://amzn.to/2O6R6yW
    https://amzn.to/2OauygI

    Leave a comment:

  • queta
    Senior Member

  • queta
    replied
    Originally posted by NK1990 View Post
    Hi i have had rosacea for 15 years and it is FINALLY clearing up! I have tried literally everything and found 2 major cures!

    1. Earthbound Organics skincare based in UK has no chemicals in their products, after trying La Roche Posay, Avene, Dermalex etc you name it ive tried it!

    2. Medical Medium doctor Anthony Williams books Life Changing Foods and his instagram page called MedicalMedium he recommends drinking 16oz celery juice in the mornings and describes the link between your gut and skin - amazing! His tips have literally cleared up my rosacea and i havent even changed my diet completely yet to a clean one as i cant resist choccies and pizza lol!
    I haven't been on the forum for a really long time but I did stop here for a few minutes to share my success with probiotics. It seems that eating raw garlic a few times a week plus having coconut milk yogurt, sauerkraut, and/or kombucha tea each day is helping the swelling in my face to go down. So I think that Dr. Williams' idea about the link between the gut and rosacea makes sense. at least for me. Glad to hear that things are going better for you!
    Queta

    Leave a comment:

  • ElaineA
    Senior Member

  • ElaineA
    replied
    Cheap, Effective, 2 Week, Oral Treatment for skin and eye problems caused by Demodex

    If your skin and/or eye problems are caused by demodex mites, this treatment may be a cure. The oral treatment worked for me after many years of being misdiagnosed by 4 different board certified dermatologists. The oral treatment kills the mites all over your body even in hard to reach glands. If you have ocular rosacea (aka blepharitis demodex) it is very important to get it treated before it damages your vision.

    If your dermatologist did not test you for Demodex mites, you should ask them to do so. Demodex mites have been implicated in Rosacea, ocular rosacea, acne, blepharitis demodex, etc.

    The combined Oral Ivermectin + Oral Metronidazole treatment has worked for me. The report on this treatment was published in the International Journal of Infectious disease in 2013. Treatment takes 2 weeks using Oral Ivermectin and Oral Metronidazole. Insurance copay was just $13.03 (Uninsured retail about $52 USD.
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...0197121201315X

    The 2013 study compares using Oral Ivermectin vs. Oral Ivermectin + Oral Metronidazole to treat 4 different skin conditions including rosacea, acne, blepharitis demodex (ocular rosacea) etc.
    Results of scientific study on 120 people with confirmed Demodex mites:

    Remission: 71.6% of people in the study with the oral Ivermectin+ oral Metronidazole treatment went into remission vs. 45% on just oral Ivermectin.
    Marked improvement: 26.7% (Oral Iver.+ Oral Metro.) vs. 33% (Oral Iver. only).
    No Improvement: 1.7% (Oral Iver.+ Oral Metro.) vs. 21.7% (Oral Iver. only)

    Using the more effective 2 drug combined treatment (from paper) based on body weight for the oral Ivermectin:
    1. Two doses of oral Ivermectin one week apart. Each weekly dose is 200 micrograms Ivermectin per kilogram of body weight. Worked out to 12 mg per dose for me. Take on an empty stomach with a large glass of water.
    2. Oral Metronidazole, 250 mg. three times a day for two weeks. Do not drink alcohol while taking oral Metronidazole and for 72 hours after taking the last tablet.

    As always, it is best to discuss this treatment with your doctor. These are prescription drugs. My family doctor was most helpful.

    I had demodicosis (or Rosacea Type II same root cause) caused by demodex mites. Onset at age 11.5 after a severe bout of German Measles and possibly the flu. Immune system was at rock bottom allowing the mites to become infested in spite of good hygiene. It got worse with every bout of the flu after that. It started with large blackheads, advanced into pustules, body acne and irritated red eyes. I never had the redness typically associated with Rosacea but I do have the broken capillaries (telangectasias).

    After being misdiagnosed with “allergic conjunctivitis” and acne vulgaris (bacterial origin) for 51 years, it advanced into blepharitis demodex (ocular rosacea) – painfully gritty, dry eyes with eyelashes falling out, etc. Over the years, 4 board certified dermatologists prescribed about 8 different antibiotics, Retin- A, Micro-Retin A, benzoyl peroxide, etc. None of the expensive treatment worked. They never checked for demodex mites.

    Demodicosis/Rosacea Type II can be confused for “Hormonal acne” due to the fact that the mites live 2-3 weeks and may indeed be tuned in to the hormonal cycles of the body. The mites eat oil. When your hormones are causing more oil to be generated, there is more for the mites to eat. Any drug or diet change that levels out or reduces the oil in your skin can temporarily control the mites by controlling their food source. In other studies, the topical version of Metronidazol has not been found to be effective but the oral version is. Oral Metronidazol is believed to work indirectly by changing something the mites are consuming or changing the environment so that they die. Some papers report successful treatment with just the oral metronidazole.

    I'm at the 5.5 months post treatment mark. My skin is clear. My eyes are clear, no longer red, no longer losing multiple eye lashes near daily, no longer painfully dry, and are now working to make the oily tear film. I've been able to stop using Cliradex wipes.
    Still washing face and eyes with 1% Tea Tree oil face wash (Tranquil Eyes by Eye Eco) followed by spraying with the Hypochlorous Acid Eyelid and Eyelash Spray by Heyedrate nightly as a precaution to fight off future mite re-infestation. I am now taking a Lutein (10 mg) + Zeaxanthin (2 mg) supplement along with my Omega 3 supplements. These supplements have improved my Meibomian Glands function possibly by reducing lid inflammation.

    I've also had 3 IPL treatments to repair broken capillaries and 2 Aqua Facials to clear congested pores. Both helped. My Aqua Facial technician did say that they had to be careful in doing Aqua Facials too close together for their rosacea patients. So far the Aqua Facials have helped and shown no signs of damage for me. My technician has me using Epionce Lytic TX to help clear the pores. The Lytic is followed 5-7 minutes later by the Epionce Renewal Lite Moisturizer to moisturize and normalize the oiliness in the pores. This treatment is working incredibly well to clear up years of damage. The Lytic TX contains 2% Salycylic Acid and moisturizers. A lighter version of Lytic is available for more sensitive skin.

    Heat compresses have also been helpful for the eye Meibomian Glands - when I remember to do them. I'm using the Thermalon Dry Eye Moist Heat Compress - microwaveable heat compress from Walgreens and elsewhere.
    ElaineA
    Senior Member
    Last edited by ElaineA; 25 July 2018, 09:01 PM. Reason: correct spelling

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  • elmonxito
    Junior Member

  • elmonxito
    replied
    I've just write mine here.
    https://rosaceagroup.org/The_Rosacea...matous-rosacea

    Leave a comment:

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